Center for Retirement Research at Boston College

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Type Research center
Established 1998
Location Boston College, Hovey House Chestnut Hill, MA, USA[1]
Director Alicia H. Munnell[2]
Board of Advisors Stuart Altman, Brandeis University, Barbara Bovbjerg, Government Accountability Office, Peter Diamond, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, J. Mark Iwry, Brookings Institution, Michael Orszag, Towers Watson, Angela O'Rand, Duke University
Website http://crr.bc.edu/
Hovey House, Boston College is the Center's location.

The Center for Retirement Research at Boston College (CRR) was established in 1998 as part of the Retirement Research Consortium (RRC).[3] In 2018, the CRR received renewed support from the U.S. Social Security Administration under the Retirement and Disability Research Consortium (RDRC).[4] The RDRC includes parallel centers at the National Bureau of Economic Research.[5], the University of Michigan[6] and the University of Wisconsin–Madison.[7] The Center is a non-profit research institute, affiliated with the Carroll School of Management at Boston College.[8] All of the CRR’s research and publications are available to the public on its website.[9]

The center sponsors multiple research projects and disseminates the findings, trains new scholars, and provides access to data on retirement.[10][11][12][13][14]

Dissemination and publications[edit]

The Center distributes its research findings to an audience of government, corporate and labor leaders, the media, and the general public through a variety of publications.

  • Issues in Brief:[15] – analyses of topical issues.
  • Working Papers:[16] – in-depth review of research issues.
  • Special Projects:[17] – initiatives that go beyond the scope of the Center’s standard research studies. The most recent special projects include: Public Plans Data website,[18] the National Retirement Risk Index,[19] The Social Security Claiming Guide,[20] The Social Security Fix-It Book,[21] a broad assessment of "Work Opportunities for Older Americans,"[22] and the Financial Security Project.[23]

Education[edit]

The annual Steven H. Sandell grant program[24] and Dissertation Fellowship program[25] fund scholarships in the field of retirement and disability research. The programs are funded by the U.S. Social Security Administration to provide opportunities for scholars to pursue projects on retirement and disability issues. Research focal areas include: disability incidence in the population, labor force participation, measuring sources of retirement income and adequacy, informing Social Security projections, effects of SSA communications on worker/beneficiary behavior, program interactions with the Affordable Care Act, state and local government pensions, and the vocational grid for determining disability insurance.[26]

Affiliated institutions[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Campus Contact Information Guide". Boston College. 2011-07-29. Retrieved 2012-07-06.
  2. ^ "Biography of Alicia H. Munnell". Center for Retirement Research at Boston College. Retrieved 2012-07-08.
  3. ^ "Research, Statistics, & Policy Analysis: Retirement Research Consortium". Ssa.gov. 2012-06-15. Retrieved 2012-06-20.
  4. ^ "Retirement and Disability Research Consortium". Social Security Administration. Retrieved 2018-12-05.
  5. ^ "National Bureau of Economic Research". NBER. Retrieved 2012-07-08.
  6. ^ "About Us | Retirement Research Center | University of Michigan". Mrrc.isr.umich.edu. Retrieved 2012-06-20.
  7. ^ "Center For Financial Security". University of Wisconsin-Madison. Retrieved 2018-12-05.
  8. ^ "CSOM - Research centers and forums". Bc.edu. 2010-08-27. Retrieved 2012-06-20.
  9. ^ "The Center for Retirement Research". Center for Retirement Research at Boston College. Retrieved 2012-07-08.
  10. ^ Farrell, Chris (2011-01-11). "Rethinking the Public-Pension Punching Bag". Business Week. Retrieved 2012-06-20.
  11. ^ "Boomers Take The 'Retire' Out Of Retirement". NPR. 2011-01-01. Retrieved 2012-06-20.
  12. ^ E.S. Browning (2011-02-19). "Boomers Find 401(k) Plans Come Up Short". The Wall Street Journal. Retrieved 2012-06-20.
  13. ^ Pear, Robert (2011-02-21). "Long Term Care Program Needs Change". New York Times. Retrieved 2012-07-08.
  14. ^ Greenhouse, Steven (2011-03-02). "Making the Most of Less". New York Times. Retrieved 2012-07-08.
  15. ^ "Issues in Brief". Center for Retirement Research at Boston College. Retrieved 2012-07-08.
  16. ^ "Working Papers". Center for Retirement Research at Boston College. Retrieved 2012-07-08.
  17. ^ "Special Projects". Center for Retirement Research at Boston College. Retrieved 2012-07-08.
  18. ^ "Public Plans Data Home". Public Plans Data. Retrieved 2018-12-07.
  19. ^ "National Retirement Risk Index". Center for Retirement Research at Boston College. Retrieved 2012-07-08.
  20. ^ "The Social Security Claiming Guide". Center for Retirement Research at Boston College. Retrieved 2012-07-08.
  21. ^ "The Social Security Fix-It Book". Center for Retirement Research at Boston College. Retrieved 2012-07-08.
  22. ^ "Working Opportunities for Older Americans". Center for Retirement Research at Boston College. Retrieved 2012-07-08.
  23. ^ "The Financial Security Project". Center for Retirement Research at Boston College. Retrieved 2012-07-08.
  24. ^ "The Steven H. Sandell Grant Program". Center for Retirement Research at Boston College. Retrieved 2012-07-08.
  25. ^ "The Dissertation Fellowship Program". Center for Retirement Research at Boston College. Retrieved 2012-07-08.
  26. ^ "RDRC Research Focal Areas". Center for Retirement Research at Boston College. Retrieved 2018-12-05.
  27. ^ "Mathematica Center for Studying Disability Policy". Mathematica Policy Research. Retrieved 2018-12-05.

Coordinates: 42°19′56″N 71°10′18″W / 42.332327°N 71.171591°W / 42.332327; -71.171591