Center for the Prevention of Genocide

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The Center for the Prevention of Genocide (CPG) is a center affiliated with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. It was started in 2013 and grew out of the work of the Committee on Conscience.[1][2][3] Their consultants include Jay Ulfelder, former director of the Political Instability Task Force.[4]

Early warning project[edit]

With assistance from Jay Ulfelder and others, CPG is building an early warning system for predicting potential conflicts and genocides.[4][5][6]

Media coverage[edit]

The work of CPG has been cited in news coverage of political events by publications such as the New York Times,[7][8][9] the Wall Street Journal,[10] Foreign Policy,[11][12] and AllAfrica.com.[13]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "About the Center for the Prevention of Genocide". United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. Retrieved June 4, 2014.
  2. ^ Herr, Alexis (July 29, 2013). "New Name, Same Aim: The Committee on Conscience becomes the Center for the Prevention of Genocide". Assessing Atrocity. Retrieved June 4, 2014.
  3. ^ Avila, Angel (March 13, 2013). "Make Your Pledge: Center for the Prevention of Genocide United States Holocaust Memorial Museum". Archived from the original on June 6, 2014. Retrieved June 4, 2014.
  4. ^ a b Ulfelder, Jay (May 29, 2014). "Introducing A New Venue for Atrocities Early Warning". Retrieved June 4, 2014.
  5. ^ "Early Warning Project". Center for the Prevention of Genocide. Retrieved June 4, 2014.
  6. ^ Ulfelder, Jay (April 7, 2012). "Building a Public Early-Warning System for Genocide and Mass Atrocities". Retrieved June 4, 2014.
  7. ^ Landler, Mark (June 3, 2014). "Declassified U.N. Cables Reveal Turning Point in Rwanda Crisis of 1994". New York Times. Retrieved June 4, 2014.
  8. ^ Rothstein, Edward (April 25, 2013). "Bystanders, Not So Innocent 'Some Were Neighbors,' at U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum". New York Times. Retrieved June 4, 2014.
  9. ^ Abramowitz, Mike (April 25, 2013). "Who Will Stand Up for the Responsibility to Protect?". New York Times. Retrieved June 4, 2014.
  10. ^ Benesch, Susan; Abramowitz, Michael (December 18, 2013). "A Prelude to Murder: Calling Humans Vermin. After a monk called them 'mad dogs,' a Buddhist mob killed 20 Muslims in Burma". Wall Street Journal. Retrieved June 4, 2014.
  11. ^ Lynch, Colum (May 1, 2014). "The U.S. Helped Create South Sudan. Can Washington Save It From Civil War?". Foreign Policy. Retrieved June 4, 2014.
  12. ^ Lynch, Colum (December 19, 2013). "Can Samantha Power Wage a War on Atrocities in Central African Republic?". Foreign Policy. Retrieved June 4, 2014.
  13. ^ "Rwanda: Experts Carry Out Postmortem of Genocide Against the Tutsi". AllAfrica.com. June 4, 2014. Retrieved June 4, 2014.

External links[edit]