Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services

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Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services
Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services logo.svg
Agency overview
FormedMarch 1977; 44 years ago (1977-03)
Preceding
  • Health Care Financing Administration (1977-2001)
HeadquartersWoodlawn, Baltimore County, Maryland
Employees6,000
Agency executive
Parent agencyDepartment of Health and Human Services
Websitewww.cms.gov Edit this at Wikidata

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), is a federal agency within the United States Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) that administers the Medicare program and works in partnership with state governments to administer Medicaid, the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP), and health insurance portability standards. In addition to these programs, CMS has other responsibilities, including the administrative simplification standards from the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA), quality standards in long-term care facilities (more commonly referred to as nursing homes) through its survey and certification process, clinical laboratory quality standards under the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments, and oversight of HealthCare.gov. CMS was previously known as the Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) until 2001.

History[edit]

Originally, the name "Medicare" in the United States referred to a program providing medical care for families of people serving in the military as part of the Dependents' Medical Care Act, which was passed in 1956.[2] President Dwight D. Eisenhower held the first White House Conference on Aging in January 1961, in which creating a health care program for social security beneficiaries was proposed.[3][4]

President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Social Security Amendments on July 30, 1965, establishing both Medicare and Medicaid. Arthur E. Hess, a deputy commissioner of the Social Security Administration, was named as first director of the Bureau of Health Insurance in 1965, placing him as the first executive in charge of the Medicare program. At the time, the program provided health insurance to 19 million Americans.[5] The Social Security Administration (SSA) became responsible for the administration of Medicare and the Social and Rehabilitation Service (SRS) became responsible for the administration of Medicaid. Both agencies were organized under what was then known as the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare (HEW).

In March 1977, the Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) was established under HEW.[6] HCFA became responsible for the coordination of Medicare and Medicaid. The responsibility for enrolling beneficiaries into Medicare and processing premium payments remained with SSA.

HCFA was renamed the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services on July 1, 2001.[6]

Workforce[edit]

CMS employs over 6,000 people, of whom about 4,000 are located at its headquarters in Woodlawn, Maryland. The remaining employees are located in the Hubert H. Humphrey Building in Washington, D.C., the 10 regional offices listed below, and in various field offices located throughout the United States.

The head of CMS is the Administrator of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. The position is appointed by the president and confirmed by the Senate.[7] On May 27, 2021 Chiquita Brooks-LaSure was sworn in as Administrator, the first black woman to serve in the role.

Regional offices[edit]

CMS has its headquarters in Woodlawn, Maryland, with 10 regional offices located throughout the United States:

List of administrators[edit]

No. Image Name Took office Left office President served under
1 Arthur Hess.jpg Arthur E. Hess[6] 1965 1967 Lyndon B. Johnson
2 Blank.png Thomas M. Tierney[6] 1967 1978 Lyndon B. Johnson
Richard Nixon
Gerald Ford
Jimmy Carter
3 Blank.png Robert Derzon[6] June 1977 November 1978 Jimmy Carter
4 Blank.png Leonard Schaeffer[6] November 1978 June 1980
5 Blank.png Howard N. Newman[6] July 1980 January 1981
6 Blank.png Carolyne Davis[6] March 1981 August 1985 Ronald Reagan
7 William L Roper.jpg William L. Roper[6] May 1986 February 1989 Ronald Reagan
George H. W. Bush
8 Gail Wilensky official photo.jpg Gail Wilensky[6] February 1990 March 1992 George H. W. Bush
9 Blank.png Bruce Vladeck[6] May 1993 September 1997 Bill Clinton
10 Nancy-Ann DeParle official portrait.jpg Nancy-Ann DeParle[6] November 1997 September 2000
11 Thomas A. Scully (2017).jpg Thomas A. Scully[6] May 2001 December 3, 2003 George W. Bush
12 MarkMcClellan.jpg Mark McClellan[6] March 25, 2004 October 14, 2006
13 Donald Berwick CMS Administrator.jpg Donald Berwick[6] July 7, 2010 December 2, 2011 Barack Obama
14 Marilyn-Tavenner.jpg Marilyn Tavenner[6] December 2, 2011 March 18, 2015
Acting Andy Slavitt official portrait.jpg Andy Slavitt March 18, 2015 January 20, 2017
15 Seema Verma official photo.jpg Seema Verma March 14, 2017 January 20, 2021 Donald Trump
Acting Liz Richter.png Elizabeth Richter January 20, 2021 May 27, 2021 Joe Biden
16 CBL Portrait HHS.png Chiquita Brooks-LaSure May 27, 2021 Present

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ https://www.hhs.gov/about/leadership/index.html
  2. ^ Robinson, P. I. (1957). Medicare: Uniformed Services Program for Dependents. Social Security Bulletin, 20(7), 9–16.
  3. ^ Tibbits C. "The 1961 White House Conference on Aging: it's rationale, objectives, and procedures". J Am Geriatr Soc. 1960 May. 8:373–77
  4. ^ Mcnamara PAT, Dirksen EM, Church F, Muskie ES. The 1961 White House Conference on Aging: basic policy statements and recommendations / prepared for the Special Committee on Aging, United States Senate 87th Congress, 1st Session, Committee Print, May 15, 1961.
  5. ^ Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. "Administrator Tenure Dates & Biographies" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on 2017-05-01.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p "Administrator Tenure Dates & Biographies, 1965 — 2015" (PDF). U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. 2015-07-01. pp. 5, 13. Retrieved 2020-11-17.
  7. ^ Kliff, Sarah (23 Nov 2011), "Medicare administrator Donald Berwick resigns in the face of Republican opposition", The Washington Post, archived from the original on 2016-03-11, retrieved 24 Nov 2011
  8. ^ "Office of Program Operations and Local Engagement | CMS" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on 2017-03-08. Retrieved 2017-03-13.
  9. ^ "Office of Program Operations and Local Engagement | CMS" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on 2017-03-08. Retrieved 2017-03-13.
  10. ^ "Office of Program Operations and Local Engagement | CMS" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on 2017-03-08. Retrieved 2017-03-13.
  11. ^ "Office of Program Operations and Local Engagement | CMS" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on 2017-03-08. Retrieved 2017-03-13.
  12. ^ "Office of Program Operations and Local Engagement | CMS" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on 2017-03-08. Retrieved 2017-03-13.
  13. ^ "Office of Program Operations and Local Engagement | CMS" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on 2017-03-08. Retrieved 2017-03-13.
  14. ^ "Office of Program Operations and Local Engagement | CMS" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on 2017-03-08. Retrieved 2017-03-13.
  15. ^ "Office of Program Operations and Local Engagement | CMS" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on 2017-03-08. Retrieved 2017-03-13.
  16. ^ "Office of Program Operations and Local Engagement | CMS" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on 2017-03-08. Retrieved 2017-03-13.
  17. ^ "Office of Program Operations and Local Engagement | CMS" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on 2017-03-08. Retrieved 2017-03-13.

[2]Robinson, P. I. (1957). Medicare: Uniformed Services Program for Dependents. Social Security Bulletin, 20(7), 9–16.

External links[edit]