Centers for Spiritual Living

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Centers for Spiritual Living
Classification Religious Science
Orientation New Thought
Associations Affiliated New Thought Network, International New Thought Alliance
Origin 1949
Los Angeles, California
Separated from Religious Science International
Merger of United Centers for Spiritual Living and International Centers for Spiritual Living, 2011
Congregations 400
Official website centersforspiritualliving.org

The Centers for Spiritual Living, or CSL, is a religious denomination promoting Religious Science that was founded by Ernest Holmes in 1926. Before 2011, it was two organizations known as United Centers for Spiritual Living (formally, United Church of Religious Science) and International Centers for Spiritual Living (formally, Religious Science International).

History[edit]

Holmes and his brother Fenwicke learned about New Thought in Boston with Mary Baker Eddy, and later in Los Angeles were drawn to the belief in the power of the mind for healing and fulfillment of life. In 1926, Holmes's major work, The Science of Mind, was published, and in 1927 he founded the Institute of Religious Science and Philosophy in Los Angeles to teach his principles. After a growing number of the Institute's graduates established churches on teachings by Holmes, it was reorganized in 1949 as the Church of Religious Science.[1][2] In the 1950s it split into two organizations that were originally called the United Church of Religious Science and Religious Science International.

Integration[edit]

The International Centers for Spiritual Living and United Centers for Spiritual Living reunited in 2011 after more than 50 years apart. After an eight-year process, the two organizations used a shared leadership model including nearly 400 volunteers. As of 2011, the organization has over 400 churches across North America.

In 2012 the newly merged Centers for Spiritual Living, elected Dr. Kenn Gordon as its first Spiritual Leader, having served in numerous capacities on the board of directors, including President of the former International Centers for Spiritual Living since 1999. In 2005 he was named Minister of the Year and received his Doctorate of Humanities. Dr. Kenn, along with wife Dr. Deborah Gordon, pastors the Centre for Spiritual Living Kelowna.

Notable members[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Religious Science", Encyclopædia Britannica. Retrieved May 27, 2011.
  2. ^ Goldberg, P. (2010) American Veda: From Emerson and the Beatles to Yoga and Meditation How Indian Spirituality Changed the West. Random House Digital, Inc. p. 98.

External links[edit]