Centerville, Alpine County, California

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Coordinates: 38°37′52″N 119°43′24″W / 38.63111°N 119.72333°W / 38.63111; -119.72333

Centerville
Former settlement
Centerville is located in California
Centerville
Centerville
Location in California
Centerville is located in the United States
Centerville
Centerville
Centerville (the United States)
Coordinates: 38°37′52″N 119°43′24″W / 38.63111°N 119.72333°W / 38.63111; -119.72333
CountryUnited States
StateCalifornia
CountyAlpine County
Elevation5,951 ft (1,814 m)

Centerville is a former settlement in Alpine County, California, United States.

History[edit]

Located along a stage coach route between Silver King Valley and the East Fork of the Carson River, Centerville was a commercial hub during the 1850s and 1860s.[2][3][4][5] Described as a "small village" with stores, a tavern, and a hotel called the Centerville House, Centerville supplied local mines with lumber for flumes, bridges, tunnels, fencing, buildings and heating.[2][5][6] Richardson's sawmill was located at Centerville during the 1860s.[2][3]

In 1864, in an election to determine the Alpine County seat, Markleeville received the most votes, beating out Centerville and two other competing towns.[7] Fire destroyed the home of the town's butcher—located at the corner of Montgomery and Jackson streets—in 1872, and "the rest of the town soon faded away".[2] Little remains of the original settlement.[4] A plaque documenting the history of Centerville was installed in 2013 by E Clampus Vitus, a fraternal organization.[2] The site is now occupied by the Centerville Flat campground.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Centerville, Alpine County, California
  2. ^ a b c d e "Centerville Plaque". Craig Ruth. Retrieved May 10, 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  3. ^ a b "Centerville Flat". Ebbetts Pass Scenic Byway Association. Retrieved May 10, 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  4. ^ a b Toiyabe National Forest, Alpine Unit Land Management Plan. United States Forest Service. 1977. pp. 24, 50.
  5. ^ a b "Ebbetts Pass Wayshowing & Interpretive Plan" (PDF). United States Forest Service. December 2014.
  6. ^ California Inventory of Historic Resources. California Office of Historic Preservation. 1976. p. 75.
  7. ^ Raymond F. Law (March 19, 1931). "Alpine County Retains Air of Pioneer Times". Oakland Tribune.
  8. ^ "Centerville Flat Campground". United States Forest Service. Retrieved May 10, 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)