Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association

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Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association (CIAA)
Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association logo.svg
FormerlyColored Intercollegiate Athletic Association
ConferenceNCAA
Founded1912
CommissionerJacqie McWilliams (since 2012)
Sports fielded
  • 14
    • men's: 6
    • women's: 8
DivisionDivision II
No. of teams12
HeadquartersCharlotte, North Carolina
RegionMiddle Atlantic States,
South Atlantic States
Official websitetheciaa.com
Locations
Location of teams in {{{title}}}

The Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association (CIAA) is a college athletic conference affiliated with the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) at the Division II level. CIAA institutions mostly consist of historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs).[1]

The twelve member institutions reside primarily along the central portion of the East Coast of the United States, in the states of Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina and South Carolina. Since a majority of the members are in North Carolina, the CIAA moved its headquarters to Charlotte, North Carolina from Hampton, Virginia in August 2015.[2]

The CIAA sponsors 14 annual championships and divides into north and south divisions for some sports. The most notable CIAA sponsored championship is the CIAA Basketball Tournament having become one of the largest college basketball events in the nation.[3]

History[edit]

Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association
Location of CIAA members: Bright-blue pog.svg current, north division Dark-blue pog.svg current, south division

The CIAA, founded on the campus of Hampton Institute (now Hampton University) in 1912, is the oldest African-American athletic conference in the United States. It was originally known as the Colored Intercollegiate Athletic Association and adopted its current name in December 1950. The conference composes predominantly of historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) spanning the east coast from Pennsylvania to South Carolina.

Founding leaders were Allen Washington and Charles H. Williams of Hampton Institute; Ernest J. Marshall of Howard University; George Johnson of Lincoln University (PA); W. E. Atkins, Charles Frazier, and H. P. Hargrave of Shaw University; and J. W. Barco and J. W. Pierce of Virginia Union University.[4]

Football experiences a major resurgence after going through a period of decline at several member universities. Football was absent from the campus of Saint Augustine's University for nearly three decades, before the administration reinstated it in 2002. Shaw University then brought back its football program in 2003, following a hiatus of 24 years.

Lincoln University, a charter member, added varsity football in 2008 and was readmitted to the CIAA after nearly three decades in Division III. Chowan University joined the CIAA in 2008 for football only. On October 14, 2008, the CIAA Board of Directors admitted Chowan as a full member effective July 1, 2009, the first non-HBCU to play in the conference.

On August 27, 2012, the CIAA announced the appointment of Jacqie Carpenter, the first African-American female commissioner to hold the position.[5]

In 2014, a collection of records, including the original 1912 documents leading to the formation of the CIAA and meeting minutes from 1913 to 1922, were sold at auction after being discovered in a storage locker. The lot sold for $11,500 to an unnamed bidder.[6]

On May 22, 2018, Chowan University announced its athletic department will realign with the Conference Carolinas as a full member while maintaining an associate relationship with the CIAA for both football and women's bowling.[7]

Chronological timeline[edit]

  • 1912 - The CIAA was founded as the Colored Intercollegiate Athletic Association (CIAA). Charter member included Hampton Institute (now Hampton University), Howard University, Lincoln University (PA); Shaw University and Virginia Union University, effective beginning the 1912-13 academic year.
  • 1920 - Virginia State College (now Virginia State University) joined the CIAA, effective in the 1920-21 academic year.
  • 1921 - Virginia Theological Seminary and College (now the Virginia University of Lynchburg) joined the CIAA, effective in the 1921-22 academic year.
  • 1923 - Saint Paul's Normal and Industrial School (later Saint Paul's Polytechnic Institute and then Saint Paul's College) joined the CIAA, effective in the 1923-24 academic year.
  • 1924 - The Agricultural and Technical College of North Carolina (now North Carolina Agricultural & Technical State University) joined the CIAA, effective in the 1924-25 academic year.
  • 1926 - Johnson C. Smith University joined the CIAA, effective in the 1926-27 academic year.
  • 1928 - North Carolina College at Durham (now North Carolina Central University) joined the CIAA, effective in the 1928-29 academic year.
  • 1929 - Morgan College (now Morgan State University) joined the CIAA, effective in the 1929-30 academic year.
  • 1931 - Livingstone College joined the CIAA, effective in the 1931-32 academic year.
  • 1932 - Bluefield State Teachers College (now Bluefield State College) joined the CIAA, effective in the 1932-33 academic year.
  • 1933 - Saint Augustine's College (now Saint Augustine's University) joined the CIAA, effective in the 1933-34 academic year.
  • 1942 - West Virginia State College (now West Virginia State University) joined the CIAA, effective in the 1942-43 academic year.
  • 1945 - Delaware State College (now Delaware State University) and Winston-Salem Teachers College (now Winston-Salem State University) joined the CIAA, effective in the 1945-46 academic year.
  • 1950 - The CIAA has renamed as the Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association (CIAA), effective in the 1950-51 academic year.
  • 1954 - VUL left the CIAA, effective after the 1953-54 academic year.
  • 1954 - Fayetteville State Teachers College (now Fayetteville State University) and Maryland State College at Princess Anne (now the University of Maryland–Eastern Shore) joined the CIAA, effective in the 1954-55 academic year.
  • 1955 - Bluefield State and West Virginia State left the CIAA to join the West Virginia Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (WVIAC), effective after the 1954-55 academic year.
  • 1957 - Elizabeth City State Teachers College (now Elizabeth City State University) joined the CIAA, effective in the 1957-58 academic year.
  • 1960 - Lincoln (Pa.) left the CIAA, effective after the 1959-60 academic year.
  • 1962 - Norfolk Polytechnic College (now Norfolk State University) joined the CIAA, effective in the 1962-63 academic year.
  • 1970 - Delaware State, Howard, Maryland–Eastern Shore (UMES), Morgan State, North Carolina A&T and North Carolina Central left the CIAA to form the Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference (MEAC), effective after the 1969-70 academic year.
  • 1979 - Bowie State College (now Bowie State University) joined the CIAA, effective in the 1979-80 academic year.
  • 1980 - North Carolina Central re-joined back to the CIAA, effective in the 1980-81 academic year.
  • 1995 - Hampton left the CIAA to join the MEAC, effective after the 1994-95 academic year.
  • 1996 - Norfolk State left the CIAA to join the MEAC, effective after the 1995-96 academic year.
  • 2006 - Winston-Salem State left the CIAA to join the MEAC, effective after the 2005-06 academic year.
  • 2007 - North Carolina Central left the CIAA for a second time to re-join back to the MEAC, effective after the 2006-07 academic year.
  • 2008 - Lincoln (Pa.) re-joined back to the CIAA, effective in the 2008-09 academic year.
  • 2008 - Chowan University joined the CIAA as an associate member for football, effective in the 2008-09 academic year.
  • 2009 - Chowan upgraded to join the CIAA for all sports, effective in the 2009-10 academic year.
  • 2010 - Winston-Salem State re-joined back to the CIAA, effective in the 2010-11 academic year.
  • 2011 - Saint Paul's left the CIAA after the school announced that it was closing, effective after the 2010-11 academic year.
  • 2018 - Claflin University joined the CIAA, effective in the 2018-19 academic year.
  • 2019 - Chowan left the CIAA to join the Conference Carolinas (CC), effective after the 2018-19 academic year; while it remained in the conference as an associate member for football and women's bowling, effective in the 2019-20 academic year.
  • 2021 - Chowan left the CIAA as an associate member for women's bowling, effective after the 2021 spring season (2020-21 academic year).

Member schools[edit]

Current members[edit]

The CIAA currently has 12 full members, one half are public schools and other half are private schools:

Institution Location Founded Affiliation Enrollment Nickname Joined Colors
Bowie State University Bowie, Maryland 1865 Public 5,561 Bulldogs 1979    
Claflin University Orangeburg, South Carolina 1869 United Methodist 1,978 Panthers 2018    
Elizabeth City State University Elizabeth City, North Carolina 1891 Public 2,421 Vikings 1957    
Fayetteville State University Fayetteville, North Carolina 1867 Public 5,000 Broncos 1954    
Johnson C. Smith University Charlotte, North Carolina 1867 Presbyterian 1,500 Golden Bulls 1926    
Lincoln University Oxford, Pennsylvania 1854 Public 2,650 Lions 1912;
2008[a]
   
Livingstone College Salisbury, North Carolina 1879 A.M.E. Church 1,200 Blue Bears 1931    
Saint Augustine's University Raleigh, North Carolina 1867 Episcopal 1,500 Falcons 1933    
Shaw University Raleigh, North Carolina 1865 Baptist 2,800 Bears 1912    
Virginia State University Ettrick, Virginia 1882 Public 7,100 Trojans 1920    
Virginia Union University Richmond, Virginia 1865 Baptist 1,700 Panthers 1912    
Winston–Salem State University Winston-Salem, North Carolina 1892 Public 6,000 Rams 1945;
2010[b]
   
Notes
  1. ^ Lincoln (Pa.) left the CIAA after the 1959–60 school year before re-joining effective in the 2008–09 school year.
  2. ^ Winston-Salem State left the CIAA after the 2005–06 school year to join the Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference, before re-joining effective in the 2010–11 school year.

Associate members[edit]

The CIAA currently has one associate member, which is also a private school:

Institution Location Founded Affiliation Enrollment Nickname Joined Colors CIAA
sport
Primary
conference
Chowan University Murfreesboro, North Carolina 1848 Baptist 1,316 Hawks 2019[a]     football Carolinas (CC)
Notes
  1. ^ Chowan was a full member of the CIAA from 2009–10 to 2018–19, before joining the Conference Carolinas (CC); but had prior to that competed for football only during the 2008 fall season (2008–09 school year). The school also competed as an associate member for women's bowling from 2019–20 to 2020–21.

Former members[edit]

The CIAA had 13 former full members, all but 5 were public schools:

Institution Location Founded Affiliation Enrollment Nickname Joined Left Current
conference
Bluefield State College Bluefield, West Virginia 1895 Public 1,246 Big Blue 1932 1955 USCAA Independent
NCAA D-II Independent
Chowan University Murfreesboro, North Carolina 1848 Baptist 1,316 Hawks 2009 2019 Carolinas (CC)
Delaware State University Dover, Delaware 1891 Public 4,768 Hornets 1945 1970 Mid-Eastern (MEAC)[a]
Hampton University Hampton, Virginia 1868 Nonsectarian 4,321 Pirates 1912 1995 Colonial (CAA)[a]
Howard University Washington, D.C. 1867 Nonsectarian 9,399 Bison 1912 1970 Mid-Eastern (MEAC)[a]
University of Maryland Eastern Shore Princess Anne, Maryland 1886 Public 2,888 Hawks 1954 1970 Mid-Eastern (MEAC)[a]
Morgan State University Baltimore, Maryland 1867 Public 7,763 Bears 1929 1970 Mid-Eastern (MEAC)[a]
Norfolk State University Norfolk, Virginia 1935 Public 5,601 Spartans 1962 1996 Mid-Eastern (MEAC)[a]
North Carolina A&T State University Greensboro, North Carolina 1891 Public 13,332 Aggies 1924 1970 Colonial (CAA)[a]
North Carolina Central University Durham, North Carolina 1910 Public 8,011 Eagles 1928,
1980
1970,
2007[b]
Mid-Eastern (MEAC)[a]
Saint Paul's College Lawrenceville, Virginia 1888 Episcopal N/A Tigers 1923 2011 N/A[c]
Virginia University of Lynchburg Lynchburg, Virginia 1886 Christian 750 Dragons 1921 1954 NCCAA Independent
West Virginia State University Institute, West Virginia 1891 Public 3,100 Yellow Jackets 1942 1955 Mountain East (MEC)
Notes
  1. ^ a b c d e f g h Currently an NCAA Division II athletic conference.
  2. ^ North Carolina Central previously withdrew from the CIAA from 1970–71 to 1979–80.
  3. ^ Saint Paul's discontinued its athletic program after the 2010–11 school year, before the school closed in 2013.

Former associate members[edit]

The CIAA had one former associate member, which was also a private school:

Institution Location Founded Affiliation Enrollment Nickname Joined Left CIAA
sport
Primary
conference
Chowan University Murfreesboro, North Carolina 1848 Baptist 1,316 Hawks 2019[a] 2021 women's bowling Carolinas (CC)
Notes
  1. ^ Chowan was a full member of the CIAA from 2009–10 to 2018–19, before joining the Conference Carolinas (CC); but had prior to that competed for football only during the 2008 fall season (2008–09 school year).

Membership timeline[edit]

Claflin UniversityChowan UniversityBowie State UniversityNorfolk State UniversityElizabeth City State UniversityUniversity of Maryland Eastern ShoreFayetteville State UniversityWinston Salem State UniversityDelaware State UniversityWest Virginia State UniversitySt. Augustine's University (North Carolina)Bluefield State CollegeLivingstone CollegeMorgan State UniversityNorth Carolina Central UniversityJohnson C. Smith UniversityNorth Carolina A%26T State UniversitySaint Paul's College (Virginia)Virginia University of LynchburgVirginia State UniversityVirginia Union UniversityShaw UniversityLincoln University (Pennsylvania)Howard UniversityHampton University

 Full member (all sports)   Full member (non-football)   Associate member (football-only)   Associate member (sport) 

Sports[edit]

A divisional format is used for basketball (M / W), bowling, football, softball, tennis (W), and volleyball.
North
  • Bowie State
  • Elizabeth City State
  • Lincoln
  • Shaw
  • Virginia State
  • Virginia Union
South
  • Claflin
  • Fayetteville State
  • Johnson C. Smith
  • Livingstone
  • Saint Augustine's
  • Winston-Salem State
Conference sports
Sport Men's Women's
Basketball Green tickY Green tickY
Bowling Green tickY
Cross Country Green tickY Green tickY
Football Green tickY
Golf Green tickY
Softball Green tickY
Tennis Green tickY Green tickY
Track & Field Indoor Green tickY Green tickY
Track & Field Outdoor Green tickY Green tickY
Volleyball Green tickY

Men's sponsored sports by school[edit]

School Basketball Cross
Country
Football Golf Tennis Track
& Field
Indoor
Track
& Field
Outdoor
Total
CIAA
Sports
Bowie State Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY 5
Claflin Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY 5
Elizabeth City State Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY 4
Fayetteville State Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY 4
Johnson C. Smith Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY 7
Lincoln Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY 6
Livingstone Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY 6
Saint Augustine's Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY 7
Shaw Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY 4
Virginia State Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY 8
Virginia Union Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY 7
Winston-Salem State Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY 4
Totals 12 12 11 7 4 8 8 67

Women's sponsored sports by school[edit]

School Basketball Bowling Cross
Country
Softball Tennis Track
& Field
Indoor
Track
& Field
Outdoor
Volleyball Total
CIAA
Sports
Bowie State Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY 8
Claflin Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY 5
Elizabeth City State Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY 6
Fayetteville State Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY 5
Johnson C. Smith Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY 8
Lincoln Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY 6
Livingstone Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY 8
Saint Augustine's Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY 7
Shaw Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY 7
Virginia State Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY 8
Virginia Union Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY 8
Winston-Salem State Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY 7
Totals 12 9 12 12 8 9 10 12 84
  • — D-I sport

Other sponsored sports by school[edit]

School Men Women
Baseball Lacrosse Soccer Swimming
& Diving
Tennis Golf Lacrosse Soccer Tennis Swimming
& Diving
Claflin PBC
Lincoln ECC ECC
Shaw IND IND
Virginia State IND

Conference facilities[edit]

School Football Basketball
Stadium Capacity Arena Capacity
Bowie State Bulldog Stadium
2,964
A.C. Jordan Arena
2,200
Claflin
non-football school
Edward Tullis Arena
3,000
Elizabeth City State Roebuck Stadium
6,500
R. L. Vaughn Center
5,000
Fayetteville State Luther "Nick" Jeralds Stadium
5,520
Felton J. Capel Arena
4,000
Johnson C. Smith Irwin Belk Complex
4,500
Brayboy Gymnasium
2,316
Lincoln Lincoln University Stadium
2,600
Manuel Rivero Hall
3,000
Livingstone Alumni Memorial Stadium
5,500
William Trent Gymnasium
1,500
Saint Augustine's George Williams Athletic Complex
2,500
Emery Gymnasium
1,000
Shaw Durham County Stadium
8,500
C.C. Spaulding Gym
1,500
Virginia State Rogers Stadium
7,909
VSU Multi-Purpose Center
6,000
Virginia Union Hovey Field
10,000
Barco-Stevens Hall
2,000
Winston–Salem State Bowman Gray Stadium
22,000
C.E. Gaines Center
3,200

CIAA Basketball Tournament[edit]

The CIAA is the first NCAA Division II conference to have its tournament televised as part of Championship Week on ESPN. Over 100,000 fans and spectators are in attendance annually and it has become one of the largest college basketball events in the nation. During the week of the tournament, there are many high-profile social and celebratory events associated with the event.[8][9] The last day of the tournament is known as "Super Saturday" in which the men's and women's tournament champions are crowned. For 15 years, the tournament had an annual $55 million economic impact on Charlotte, North Carolina and was consistently the largest event held in the city every year.[10] The conference was offered better incentives to move it to Baltimore, Maryland in 2021,[11][12] where it will remain through 2025.[13]

Men's Tournament results
Year Champion[14] Venue (Location)[15]
1946 North Carolina College Turner's Arena (Washington, DC)
1947 Virginia State Turner's Arena (Washington, DC)
1948 West Virginia State Turner's Arena (Washington, DC)
1949 West Virginia State Uline Arena (Washington, DC)
1950 North Carolina Central Uline Arena (Washington, DC)
1951 Virginia Union Uline Arena (Washington, DC)
1952 Virginia Union Hurt Gymnasium (Baltimore, MD)
1953 Winston-Salem State McDougald Gymnasium (Durham, NC)
1954 Virginia Union McDougald Gymnasium (Durham, NC)
1955 Virginia Union McDougald Gymnasium (Durham, NC)
1956 Maryland State McDougald Gymnasium (Durham, NC)
1957 Winston-Salem State McDougald Gymnasium (Durham, NC)
1958 North Carolina A&T McDougald Gymnasium (Durham, NC)
1959 North Carolina A&T McDougald Gymnasium (Durham, NC)
1960 Winston-Salem State Greensboro Coliseum (Greensboro, NC)
1961 Winston-Salem State War Memorial Coliseum (Winston-Salem, NC)
1962 North Carolina A&T War Memorial Coliseum (Winston-Salem, NC)
1963 Winston-Salem State War Memorial Coliseum (Winston-Salem, NC)
1964 North Carolina A&T Greensboro Coliseum (Greensboro, NC)
1965 Norfolk State Greensboro Coliseum (Greensboro, NC)
1966 Winston-Salem State Greensboro Coliseum (Greensboro, NC)
1967 North Carolina A&T Greensboro Coliseum (Greensboro, NC)
1968 Norfolk State Greensboro Coliseum (Greensboro, NC)
1969 Elizabeth City State Greensboro Coliseum (Greensboro, NC)
1970 Winston-Salem State Greensboro Coliseum (Greensboro, NC)
1971 Norfolk State Greensboro Coliseum (Greensboro, NC)
1972 Norfolk State Greensboro Coliseum (Greensboro, NC)
1973 Fayetteville State Greensboro Coliseum (Greensboro, NC)
1974 Norfolk State Greensboro Coliseum (Greensboro, NC)
1975 Norfolk State Greensboro Coliseum (Greensboro, NC)
1976 Norfolk State Hampton Coliseum (Hampton, VA)
1977 Winston-Salem State Hampton Coliseum (Hampton, VA)
1978 Norfolk State Hampton Coliseum (Hampton, VA)
1979 Virginia Union Norfolk Scope (Norfolk, VA)
1980 Virginia Union Norfolk Scope (Norfolk, VA)
1981 Elizabeth City State Norfolk Scope (Norfolk, VA)
1982 Hampton Norfolk Scope (Norfolk, VA)
1983 Hampton Norfolk Scope (Norfolk, VA)
1984 Norfolk State Norfolk Scope (Norfolk, VA)
1985 Virginia Union Norfolk Scope (Norfolk, VA)
1986 Norfolk State Richmond Coliseum (Richmond, VA)
1987 Virginia Union Richmond Coliseum (Richmond, VA)
1988 Virginia State Norfolk Scope (Norfolk, VA)
1989 Virginia State Norfolk Scope (Norfolk, VA)
1990 Norfolk State Norfolk Scope (Norfolk, VA)
1991 Hampton Richmond Coliseum (Richmond, VA)
1992 Virginia Union Richmond Coliseum (Richmond, VA)
1993 Virginia Union Richmond Coliseum (Richmond, VA)
1994 Virginia Union LJVM Coliseum (Winston-Salem, NC)
1995 Virginia Union LJVM Coliseum (Winston-Salem, NC)
1996 Norfolk State LJVM Coliseum (Winston-Salem, NC)
1997 Saint Augustine's LJVM Coliseum (Winston-Salem, NC)
1998 Virginia Union LJVM Coliseum (Winston-Salem, NC)
1999 Winston-Salem State LJVM Coliseum (Winston-Salem, NC)
2000 Winston-Salem State Entertainment & Sports Arena (Raleigh, NC)
2001 Johnson C. Smith Entertainment & Sports Arena (Raleigh, NC)
2002 Shaw Entertainment & Sports Arena (Raleigh, NC)
2003 Bowie State RBC Center (Raleigh, NC)
2004 Virginia Union RBC Center (Raleigh, NC)
2005 Virginia Union RBC Center (Raleigh, NC)
2006 Virginia Union Charlotte Bobcats Arena (Charlotte, NC)
2007 Elizabeth City State Charlotte Bobcats Arena (Charlotte, NC)
2008 Johnson C. Smith Charlotte Bobcats Arena (Charlotte, NC)
2009 Johnson C. Smith Time Warner Cable Arena (Charlotte, NC)
2010 Saint Augustine's Time Warner Cable Arena (Charlotte, NC)
2011 Shaw Time Warner Cable Arena (Charlotte, NC)
2012 Winston-Salem State Time Warner Cable Arena (Charlotte, NC)
2013 Bowie State Time Warner Cable Arena (Charlotte, NC)
2014 Livingstone Time Warner Cable Arena (Charlotte, NC)
2015 Livingstone Time Warner Cable Arena (Charlotte, NC)
2016 Virginia State Time Warner Cable Arena (Charlotte, NC)
2017 Bowie State Bojangles' Coliseum (Charlotte, NC)
Spectrum Center (Charlotte, NC)
2018 Virginia Union Bojangles' Coliseum (Charlotte, NC)
Spectrum Center (Charlotte, NC)
2019 Virginia State Bojangles' Coliseum (Charlotte, NC)
Spectrum Center (Charlotte, NC)
2020 Winston-Salem State Bojangles' Coliseum (Charlotte, NC)
Spectrum Center (Charlotte, NC)
2022 Fayetteville State Royal Farms Arena (Baltimore, MD)

CIAA cheerleading[edit]

One of the signature events of "Super Saturday" at the CIAA Basketball Tournament is the Cheer Exhibition. At the exhibition, CIAA cheer squads showcase elaborate routines to entertain spectators and display their talents.[16][17] Every cheerleading team in the CIAA is a "Stomp-N-Shake" squad which is a unique style of cheer that is most common among predominately African-American schools and colleges located in the East Coast region.

The CIAA is one of the only conferences in the country that has an annual All-Conference Cheerleading Team. The All-Conference Cheerleading Team is a recognition bestowed on select cheerleaders in the conference that exemplify the epitome of school spirit, leadership, athleticism, and academic excellence.[18]

Institution Squad name
Bowie State University The "Golden Girls"
Claflin University The "Panther Dolls"
Elizabeth City State University The "D'Lytes"
Fayetteville State University "Cheer Phi Smoov"
Johnson C. Smith University The "Luv-A-Bulls"
Lincoln University The "Fe Fe's"
Livingstone College The "La La's"
Saint Augustine's University The "Bluechips"
Shaw University The "Chi Chi's"
Virginia State University The "Woo Woo's"
Virginia Union University The "Rah Rah's"
Winston-Salem State University The "Powerhouse of Red and White"

References[edit]

  1. ^ "About the CIAA".
  2. ^ Burkins, Glenn (March 3, 2014). "CIAA headquarters will move to Charlotte; tournament stays 6 more years". Qcitymetro.com. Archived from the original on September 16, 2015. Retrieved August 4, 2015.
  3. ^ "'We go perfect together': CIAA basketball tournament is coming to Baltimore, bringing spirit and tourism with it".
  4. ^ Raymond Schmidt, Shaping College Football: The Transformation of an American Sport, 1919-1930 (Syracuse University Press, 2007) p133
  5. ^ "Carpenter Named New CIAA Commissioner". Abclocal.go.com. August 27, 2012. Retrieved August 27, 2012.[permanent dead link]
  6. ^ "Saunders: This CIAA treasure trove fails to bring in big money at auction". February 26, 2014. Archived from the original on March 8, 2014. Retrieved February 26, 2014.
  7. ^ "Chowan Announces Conference Realignment". gocuhawks.com. May 22, 2018. Retrieved August 27, 2018.
  8. ^ "2007 CIAA Tournament Week is Largest Ever". CIAA. April 2, 2007. Archived from the original on September 22, 2015. Retrieved August 4, 2015.
  9. ^ Marusakjmarusak, Joe (February 23, 2016). "CIAA basketball tournament declared an 'extraordinary event'". The Charlotte Observer. Retrieved September 1, 2016.
  10. ^ "CIAA brings big business to uptown Charlotte". February 22, 2016. Archived from the original on March 4, 2016. Retrieved February 24, 2016.
  11. ^ "CIAA tournament to leave Charlotte for Baltimore in 2021". WBTV.com. January 7, 2019. Retrieved January 15, 2019.
  12. ^ "75th CIAA tournament to be 15th, final year in Charlotte". WSOCTV.com. January 10, 2020. Retrieved March 1, 2020.
  13. ^ "CIAA extends contract with Baltimore to host basketball tournament through 2025". WBAL-TV. June 1, 2022. Retrieved June 1, 2022.
  14. ^ "All-Time CIAA Men's Basketball Champions". Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association. Retrieved March 8, 2022.
  15. ^ "CIAA Basketball Tournament Site History". Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association. Retrieved March 8, 2022.
  16. ^ "CIAA Basketball Tournament Preview". Charlotte's got a lot. Archived from the original on September 21, 2017. Retrieved October 25, 2017.
  17. ^ "SAU BlueChips Perform Well At CIAA Cheerleading Competition On Super Saturday". Saint Augustine's University. March 1, 2015. Archived from the original on September 20, 2017. Retrieved October 25, 2017.
  18. ^ "2018-19 All-CIAA Cheerleading Team". CIAA. January 11, 2019. Retrieved December 1, 2019.

External links[edit]