Centre for Crime and Justice Studies

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The Centre for Crime and Justice Studies (CCJS) is a charity based in the United Kingdom focusing on crime and the criminal justice system.[1] It seeks to bring together people involved in criminal justice through various means, including publications, conferences, and courses.[2]

The Centre was established in 1931 and is based in Vauxhall, London. It publishes The British Journal of Criminology[3] and the quarterly magazine Criminal Justice Matters.[4] The Centre also runs the annual Una Padel Award scheme in the memory of former director Una Padel. It was hosted by King's College London until 2010, and is now affiliated to the International Centre for Comparative Criminological Research at the Open University.

History[edit]

The organisation was established in July 1931 by Grace Pailthorpe (who was a surgeon during the First World War, a Freudian psychotherapist, and later a surrealist artist) as the Association for the Scientific Treatment of Criminals. It was renamed in July 1932 to the Institute for the Scientific Treatment of Delinquency, and to the Institute for the Study and Treatment of Delinquency (ISTD) in 1951, adopting its current name in 1999.[5]

The ISTD initially had an psychoanalytical approach to crime and criminal justice, and its early members included Sigmund Freud, Carl Jung, Otto Rank, and Edward Glover. In 1950 the organisation published the first issue of The British Journal of Delinquency, renamed in 1960 The British Journal of Criminology: An International Review of Crime and Society which reflected, in Glover's view, "the long distance policy of the ISTD to effect the extension of research into various non-criminal fields of observation".[5] The organisation had an influential role in the development of criminology in the UK following the Second World War.[5][6]

In 1988 the ISTD organised the first major Europe-wide congress on crime and criminal justice.[7] The following year they published the first issue of the quarterly magazine Criminal Justice Matters.[8] In 2003 Harm and Society was established as an independent project of the organisation with the aim to "stimulate debate about the limitations of criminal justice and promote alternative perspectives on social harm, crime and social policy".[9][10]

From 1999 to her death in 2006 the director was Una Padel, and in her memory the organisation established the annual Una Padel Award, giving the first in 2007 to Prison Chat UK and to Yarl's Wood Befrienders chair, Gillian Margaret Butler.[11][12][13] Richard Garside replaced Padel in 2006.[14]

In 2009 they prganised "What is crime?", a competition for the UK's best crime photography. The overall winner, Reyaz Limalia, took a picture of the Israeli West Bank barrier. "At first glance it looks like the graffiti on the wall is the crime", Limalia said. "But the true crime is the oppression of the wall itself."[15][16] The organisation left King's College London School of Law in August 2010[17] and is now affiliated with the International Centre for Comparative Criminological Research at the Open University.[18] The current director is Richard Garside. Today, the organisation employs 14 staff members and has an annual turnover of about £800,000.[5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Gibson, Bryan (2009). The Pocket A-Z of Criminal Justice. Waterside Press. p. 198. ISBN 978-1-904380-50-4
  2. ^ Leech, Mark; Cheney, Deborah. (2002). The Prisons Handbook 2002. Waterside Press. pp. 467–468. ISBN 1-872870-16-3
  3. ^ "British Journal of Criminology". Oxford University Press. Retrieved 24 July 2011.
  4. ^ CJM. Centre for Crime and Justice Studies. Retrieved 24 July 2011.
  5. ^ a b c d "History of CCJS". Centre for Crime and Justice Studies. Retrieved 28 October 2010. Archived by WebCite on 28 October 2010.
  6. ^ Faulkner, David (2006). Crime, State, and Citizen: A Field Full of Folk. Waterside Press. p. 107. ISBN 1-904380-23-9
  7. ^ King, Roy D.; Wincu, Emma. (2007). Doing Research on Crime and Justice. Oxford University Press. p. 205. ISBN 978-0-19-928762-8
  8. ^ Criminal Justice Matters – list of issues. Taylor & Francis. Retrieved 24 July 2011.
  9. ^ "Harm and Society". Centre for Crime and Justice Studies. Retrieved 28 October 2010. Archived by WebCite on 28 October 2010. See their leaflet at ""Harm and Society: Changing the terms of debate"" (PDF).  (54 KB). Centre for Crime and Criminal Justice Studies. Retrieved 28 October 2010.
  10. ^ Coester, Mark; Marks, Erich; Meyer, Anja. (2008). Qualification in Crime Prevention: Status Report from various European Countries. Books on Demand. p. 102. ISBN 978-3-936999-46-4
  11. ^ "Una Padel Award". Centre for Crime and Justice Studies. Retrieved 28 October 2010. Archived by WebCite on 28 October 2010.
  12. ^ "Obituary: Una Padel". The Guardian. 7 September 2006. Retrieved 28 September 2010.
  13. ^ "The Una Padel Award 2007 ". Centre for Crime and Justice Studies. Retrieved 28 October 2010. Archived by WebCite on 28 October 2010.
  14. ^ Richard Garside. Centre for Crime and Justice Studies. Retrieved 28 October 2010. Archived by WebCite on 28 October 2010.
  15. ^ Walker, Tim. "Caught on camera: Britain's best crime photography". The Independent. 4 June 2009. Retrieved 24 July 2011. Archived by WebCite on 23 July 2011.
  16. ^ 2008/2009 annual report, pp. 7, 15.
  17. ^ "CCJS have left King's College London". King's College London. August 2010. Retrieved 24 July 2011. Archived by WebCite on 23 July 2011.
  18. ^ "People". Open University. Retrieved 24 July 2011. Archived by WebCite on 23 July 2011.

Sources[edit]

  • "2008/2009 annual report" (PDF). Archived from the original on 2011-07-24.  (2.72 MB). Centre for Crime and Justice Studies. Retrieved 28 October 2010. by WebCite on 23 July 2011. Annual reports for other years can be found here.

External links[edit]