White-eyelid mangabey

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White-eyelid mangabeys
Sooty mangabey (Cercocebus atys)
Scientific classification Edit this classification
Domain: Eukaryota
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Primates
Suborder: Haplorhini
Infraorder: Simiiformes
Family: Cercopithecidae
Subfamily: Cercopithecinae
Tribe: Papionini
Genus: Cercocebus
É. Geoffroy, 1812[1]
Type species
Cercocebus fuliginosus
É. Geoffroy, 1812
(= Simia (Cercopithecus) aethiops torquatus, Kerr, 1792)[1]
Species

See text

Synonyms[1]
  • Aethiops Martin, 1841
  • Leptocebus Trouessart, 1904

The white-eyelid mangabeys are African Old World monkeys belonging to the genus Cercocebus. They are characterized by their bare upper eyelids, which are lighter than their facial skin colouring, and the uniformly coloured hairs of the fur.[2] The other two genera of mangabeys, Lophocebus and Rungwecebus, were once thought to be very closely related to Cercocebus, so much so that all the species were placed in one genus, but Lophocebus and Rungwecebus species are now understood to be more closely related to the baboons in genus Papio, while the Cercocebus species are more closely related to the mandrill.

Species[edit]

Genus CercocebusGeoffroy, 1812 – seven species
Common name Scientific name and subspecies Range Size and ecology IUCN status and estimated population
Agile mangabey

Drawing of brown monkey

C. agilis
(H. Milne-Edwards, 1886)
Central Africa
Map of range
Size: 44–65 cm (17–26 in) long, plus 45–79 cm (18–31 in) tail[3]

Habitat: Forest[4]

Diet: Fruit, seeds and shoots, as well as small vertebrates[4]
 LC 


Unknown Population declining[4]

Collared mangabey

Gray monkey

C. torquatus
(Kerr, 1792)
Western Africa
Map of range
Size: 45–67 cm (18–26 in) long, plus 60–75 cm (24–30 in) tail[5]

Habitat: Forest[6]

Diet: Fruit and nuts, as well as stems and roots[5]
 EN 


Unknown Population declining[6]

Golden-bellied mangabey

Brown monkey and baby

C. chrysogaster
Lydekker, 1900
Central Africa
Map of range
Size: 40–80 cm (16–31 in) long, plus 45–100 cm (18–39 in) tail[7]

Habitat: Forest[8]

Diet: Invertebrates, fruit, seeds, and nectar[7]
 EN 


Unknown Population declining[8]

Sanje mangabey

Gray monkey

C. sanjei
Mittermeier, 1986
East-central Africa
Map of range
Size: 50–65 cm (20–26 in) long, plus 55–65 cm (22–26 in) tail[9]

Habitat: Forest[10]

Diet: Fruit, nuts, and seeds, as well as fungi, invertebrates, and plants[10]
 EN 


Unknown Population declining[10]

Sooty mangabey

Gray monkey

C. atys
(Audebert, 1797)
Western Africa Size: 40–68 cm (16–27 in) long, plus 40–80 cm (16–31 in) tail[11]

Habitat: Forest and savanna[12]

Diet: Fruit and nuts, as well as swamp plants, grass, seeds, fungi, and invertebrates[11]
 VU 


Unknown Population declining[12]

Tana River mangabey

Gray monkey

C. galeritus
Peters, 1879
Eastern Africa
Map of range
Size: 44–63 cm (17–25 in) long, plus 50–68 cm (20–27 in) tail[13]

Habitat: Forest, shrubland, and inland wetlands[14]

Diet: Fruit and seeds, as well as stems, leaves, insects, and fungi[13]
 CR 


100–1,000 Population declining[14]

White-naped mangabey

Brown and white monkey and baby

C. lunulatus
(Temminck, 1853)
Western Africa
Map of range
Size: 52–73 cm (20–29 in) long, plus 68–74 cm (27–29 in) tail[5]

Habitat: Forest and inland wetlands[15]

Diet: Fruit, leaves, seeds, buds, and grass[16]
 EN 


Unknown Population declining[15]


References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Groves, C. P. (2005). Wilson, D. E.; Reeder, D. M. (eds.). Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and Geographic Reference (3rd ed.). Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. pp. 153–154. ISBN 0-801-88221-4. OCLC 62265494.
  2. ^ Chisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "Mangabey" . Encyclopædia Britannica. Vol. 17 (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press. p. 568.
  3. ^ Kingdon 2015, p. 136
  4. ^ a b c Maisels, F.; Hicks, T. C.; Hart, J.; Shah, N. (2020) [amended version of 2019 assessment]. "Cercocebus agilis". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. 2020: e.T136615A167735266. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2020-1.RLTS.T136615A167735266.en.
  5. ^ a b c Kingdon 2015, p. 134
  6. ^ a b Maisels, F.; Oates, J. F.; Linder, J.; Ikemeh, R.; Imong, I.; Etiendem, D. (2019) [errata version of 2019 assessment]. "Cercocebus torquatus". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. 2019: e.T4201A154210757. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2019-1.RLTS.T4201A154210757.en.
  7. ^ a b Patterson, Haley (2017). "Cercocebus chrysogaster". Animal Diversity Web. University of Michigan. Archived from the original on August 12, 2023. Retrieved July 24, 2023.
  8. ^ a b Hart, J. A.; Thompson, J. (2020). "Cercocebus chrysogaster". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. 2020: e.T4207A17956177. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2020-2.RLTS.T4207A17956177.en.
  9. ^ Kingdon 2015, p. 137
  10. ^ a b c McCabe, G; Rovero, F.; Fernández, D.; Butynski, T. M.; Struhsaker, T. T. (2019). "Cercocebus sanjei". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. 2019: e.T4203A17955753. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2019-3.RLTS.T4203A17955753.en.
  11. ^ a b Lee, Scarlett (2012). "Cercocebus atys". Animal Diversity Web. University of Michigan. Archived from the original on July 24, 2023. Retrieved July 24, 2023.
  12. ^ a b Koné, I.; McGraw, S.; Gonedelé Bi, S.; Barrie, A. (2020). "Cercocebus atys". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. 2020: e.T136933A92248451. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2020-2.RLTS.T136933A92248451.en.
  13. ^ a b Mittl, Gregory (2011). "Cercocebus galeritus". Animal Diversity Web. University of Michigan. Archived from the original on August 12, 2023. Retrieved July 24, 2023.
  14. ^ a b Butynski, T. M.; de Jong, Y. A.; Wieczkowski, J.; King, J. (2020). "Cercocebus galeritus". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. 2020: e.T4200A17956330. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2020-2.RLTS.T4200A17956330.en.
  15. ^ a b Dempsey, A.; Gonedelé Bi, S.; Matsuda Goodwin, R.; Koffi, A. (2020). "Cercocebus lunulatus". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. 2020: e.T4206A92247733. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2020-2.RLTS.T4206A92247733.en.
  16. ^ Kingdon 2014, p. 184

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