Cervical sinus

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Cervical sinus
Kiemenbogen.jpg
Pattern of the branchial arches. I-IV branchial arches, 1-4 branchial pouches (inside) and/or pharyngeal grooves (outside)
a Tuberculum laterale
b Tuberculum impar
c Foramen cecum
d Ductus thyreoglossus
e Sinus cervicalis
Details
Latin sinus cervicalis
Dorlands
/Elsevier
s_12/12738639
Anatomical terminology

During Human embryogenesis the mandibular arch and hyoid arch grow more rapidly than those behind them, with the result that the latter become, to a certain extent, telescoped within the former, and a deep depression, the cervical sinus, is formed on either side of the neck.

This sinus is bounded in front by the hyoid arch, and behind by the thoracic wall; it is ultimately obliterated by the fusion of its walls.

Formed by the walls of the 2-4th pharyngeal grooves merging. Sometimes it can remain anterior to the sternocleidomastoid muscle. It can communicate with the skin( external cervical fistula) or with the pharynx ( internal cervical fistuala). Prone to infection.

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References[edit]

This article incorporates text in the public domain from the 20th edition of Gray's Anatomy (1918)

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