Cessna Citation Hemisphere

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Citation Hemisphere
Cessna Citation Hemisphere.jpg
Role Corporate Jet
National origin United States
Manufacturer Textron Aviation
Status development suspended (July 2019)
Unit cost
$30-35 million[1]

The Cessna Citation Hemisphere is a 4,500 nautical miles (8,300 km) range, Mach 0.9 business jet project by Cessna. Announced in November 2015, it was then expected to fly in 2019 but its development was suspended in April 2018 due to a delay in the development of its Safran Silvercrest engines.

Development[edit]

Announced at the 2015 National Business Aviation Association (NBAA) conference with the widest cabin in its class, it was expected to fly in 2019.[2]

Although the Snecma Silvercrest was originally selected, the process was re-opened to the Pratt & Whitney Canada PW800.[3] The Silvercrest with over 12,000 lbf (53 kN) of thrust was confirmed for the 2016 NBAA Convention, along the selection of Honeywell Primus Epic cockpit and Thales Group fly-by-wire flight control system.[4]

The Silvercrest axial-centrifugal high-pressure compressor architecture is common below 7,000 lbf (31 kN) but rare in its 10,000–12,000 lbf (44–53 kN) range, and the pressure losses complexity at the final centrifugal stage made it slow to respond to commands in high altitude tests. This made Dassault cancel its silvercrest-powered Falcon 5X, but the Hemisphere business case depends on it as it could lead to the best fuel efficiency in the segment. Textron is confident Safran can resolve the problems before the 2019 first flight.[5]

In April 2018, development was suspended to see how Safran manage the Silvercrest problems before a decision on its continuation is made, or to defer it or to switch to another engine.[6] In May 2018, Safran announced it had launched a high-pressure compressor redesign for a go-ahead decision by the middle of 2019, after testing, shelving the Hemisphere program if problems cannot be fixed.[7] The redesigned compressor will be tested in July 2019 to prove the engine operation.[8]

On October 15, 2018, fractional operator NetJets announced the purchase of up to 150 Hemispheres, priced at $35 million each, along 175 Citation Longitude, sold for $26 million.[9]

In July 2019, Textron suspended the development as its Safran Silvercrest turbofans did not meet objectives.[10]

Specifications[edit]

Data from Citation Hemisphere[11]

General characteristics

  • Capacity: 12 passengers
  • Fuselage diameter: 102 inches (260 cm)
  • Powerplant: 2 × Snecma Silvercrest turbofans, 12,000 lbf (53 kN) thrust each

Performance

  • Cruise speed: 516 kn (594 mph, 956 km/h) mach 0.9
  • Range: 4,500 nmi (5,200 mi, 8,300 km)
  • Cabin Altitude: 5,000 ft (1,500 m)

See also[edit]

Related development

Aircraft of comparable role, configuration and era

References[edit]

  1. ^ Stephen Trimble (16 November 2015). "NBAA: Textron revamps Longitude and introduces Hemisphere". flightglobal.
  2. ^ "Cessna showcases new Citation Longitude at NBAA 2015; announces large cabin Citation Hemisphere" (Press release). 16 November 2015.
  3. ^ "A Discussion with Pratt & Whitney Canada President John Saabas". AirInsight. June 9, 2016.
  4. ^ "Cessna selects engine, avionics and fly-by-wire suppliers for the latest in its large-cabin Citation business jet family" (Press release). Textron Aviation. October 31, 2016.
  5. ^ Stephen Trimble (31 January 2018). "Fate of Hemisphere project hinges on Silvercrest fix, CEO says". Flightglobal.
  6. ^ Mark Huber (April 18, 2018). "Textron Aviation Suspends Citation Hemisphere Program". AIN.
  7. ^ Stephen Trimble (28 May 2018). "Silvercrest compressor redesign underway as Hemisphere awaits decision". Flightglobal.
  8. ^ Matt Thurber (September 20, 2018). "Hemisphere Still Part of Textron Aviation's Future". AIN.
  9. ^ Stephen Pope (October 15, 2018). "NetJets Inks Massive Deal for Cessna Citation Jets". Flying magazine.
  10. ^ Michael Gubisch (17 July 2019). "Textron suspends Cessna Hemisphere programme". Flightglobal.
  11. ^ "Citation Hemisphere". Cessna. Archived from the original on 2015-11-20. Retrieved 2015-11-17.