Cessna Citation Latitude

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Citation Latitude
Air Charter Scotland, G-SHUI, Cessna 680A Citation Latitude (44389250211).jpg
Role Corporate Jet
National origin United States
Manufacturer Textron Aviation
First flight 18 February 2014
Status In production
Produced 2014-Present
Number built 124 by May 2018[1]
Unit cost
Under US$16.65M (2018)[2]
Developed from Cessna Citation Sovereign
Developed into Cessna Citation Longitude

The Cessna Citation Latitude (Model 680A) is a 2,700 nmi (5,000 km) range business jet built by Cessna. It was announced at the 2011 NBAA convention, the prototype first flew on 18 February 2014, it achieved FAA certification on June 5, 2015 and first deliveries begun on August 27. It keeps the Model 680 Sovereign wing, twin P&WC PW306D turbofans and cruciform tail, but its clean sheet stand-up circular fuselage has a flat floor. This new fuselage is kept in the later Cessna Citation Longitude.

Development[edit]

The $14.9 million Citation Latitude was announced by Cessna at the annual NBAA convention in October 2011, between the $12.6 million Citation XLS+ and the $17.5 million Citation Sovereign.[3] The prototype first flew on 18 February 2014 in Wichita, Kansas.[4] Cessna announced on June 5, 2015 that it had achieved FAA certification for the type.[5] On August 27, 2015, Cessna announced the first deliveries had begun.[6]

Design[edit]

It keeps the Citation Sovereign wing, twin Pratt & Whitney Canada PW306D turbofans and cruciform tail. Its clean sheet, all metal stand-up circular fuselage has a flat floor and seats nine.[3]

Typical missions are 2.0-2.7 hours and with 400 kn (740 km/h) block speeds and most operators can fly 5-6 hours at Mach 0.72-0.76 for a 2,000-2,400 nmi range, with short takeoff requirements and good hot and high performance. A first hour fuel burn of 2,000–2,500 lb (910–1,130 kg) followed by 1,600–1,900 lb (730–860 kg) the second hour and fuel burn can reach 3,300 lb (1,500 kg) for a 2 hour trip with favorable conditions. It lists for $17.5-18 million typically equipped, the same as the Embraer Legacy 450 with a similar flat floor cabin for club four plus two chairs but over 200 miles more range, 25–30 kn (46–56 km/h) higher cruise and fly-by-wire controls. Embraer is firm on list price while Textron discounts the latitude by up to 20% for $13.5-14 million to sell three times as many aircraft.[7]

Operational history[edit]

Deliveries to customers began in the third quarter of 2015 and sixteen had been handed over by the end of the year.[8] By May 2018, almost three years since introduction, 124 were delivered and logged 80,000 flight hours.[1]

In June 2018, of 129 delivered, 104 were in the US, three in Mexico, two each are based in China, France and Turkey, and there was one in Chile, Paraguay, the Philippines, Poland, Scotland and Switzerland. It is used by medium-size corporations, typically flying 200-300 hours per year, and large fleet operators, the largest being NetJets which booked 25 firm orders and 125 options in 2012 and received 44 aircraft for its U.S. operations and 10 for Europe by June 2018, flying theirs over 1,000 hours per year.[7] By mid-September, the 136 delivered have logged 115,000 flight hours, and Textron claims it outsells the competition by four to one.[9]

Specifications (Citation Latitude)[edit]

left side
front view on approach

Data from Cessna[10]

General characteristics

  • Crew: 2
  • Capacity: 9
  • Length: 62 ft 3 in (18.97 m)
  • Wingspan: 72 ft 4 in (22.05 m)
  • Height: 20 ft 11 in (6.38 m)
  • Wing area: 543 sq ft (50.4 m2)
  • Aspect ratio: 9.64
  • Airfoil: 16.3° sweep
  • Empty weight: 18,656 lb (8,462 kg)
  • Max takeoff weight: 30,800 lb (13,971 kg)
  • Fuel capacity: 11,394 lb (5,168 kg)
  • Maximum Payload: 2,544 lb (1,154 kg)
  • cabin: 72 in (1.83 m) height × 77 in (1.96 m) width
  • Powerplant: 2 × Pratt Whitney Canada PW306D1 turbofan, 5,907 lbf (26.28 kN) thrust each

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 446 kn (513 mph; 826 km/h) maximum cruise
  • Cruise speed: 368 kn (423 mph; 682 km/h) long range [2]
  • Never exceed speed: 459 kn; 528 mph (850 km/h) Mach .80
  • Range: 2,700 nmi (3,107 mi; 5,000 km) 4 Passenger
  • Service ceiling: 45,000 ft (13,716 m)
  • Rate of climb: 2,313 ft/min (11.75 m/s) to FL370
  • Time to altitude: 16 min to FL370[2]
  • Wing loading: 56.7 lb/sq ft (277 kg/m2) MTOW
  • Thrust/weight: 0.38
  • Takeoff: 3,580 ft (1,091 m)
  • Landing: 2,480 ft (756 m)

Avionics

See also[edit]

Related development

Aircraft of comparable role, configuration and era

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Ian Sheppard (May 28, 2018). "Citation Latitude Clocks 5,000 Hours with NetJets Europe". AIN online.
  2. ^ a b c "Purchase Planning Handbook" (PDF). Business & Commercial Aviation. Aviation Week Network. May 2018.
  3. ^ a b Croft, John (10 October 2011). "Cessna gets attitude with Latitude". Washington DC: Flightglobal. Retrieved 9 April 2013.
  4. ^ Trimble, Stephen (19 February 2014). "Cessna completes Latitude first flight". Washington DC: Flightglobal. Retrieved 22 June 2015.
  5. ^ "Cessna Citation Latitude awarded FAA certification" (Press release). Wichita, KS: Textron Aviation. 5 June 2015.
  6. ^ "Citation Latitude now in the hands of customers with deliveries underway" (Press release). Cessna. August 27, 2015.
  7. ^ a b Fred George (Jun 22, 2018). "Citation Latitude: Bargain-Priced Super-Midsize Wins Customer Loyalty". Business & Commercial Aviation.
  8. ^ "2015 Year End General Aviation Aircraft Shipment Report" (PDF). GAMA. March 21, 2016.
  9. ^ Matt Thurber (October 11, 2018). "Textron Aviation Optimistic for Future". AIN online.
  10. ^ "Citation Latitude". Cessna. Retrieved 1 July 2016.

External links[edit]