Chō-han

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Chō-Han Bakuchi
Dice game using two dice
Two six-sided dice and a cup on a wooden surface. In the photograph, the dice are showing the values 6 and 3, which has an odd sum (9). In the game Chō-han, players who bet on 'han' (odd) would win their bets.
Two dice, rolling 6 and 3, giving a sum of 9 (odd bets win) in the game Chō-han.
Other name(s)
    • Chō-Han (丁半)
    • Even-odd
Random chancecomplete
Material(s) required2× six-sided dice
Synonym(s)Chō-Han

Chō-Han Bakuchi or simply Chō-Han (丁半) is a traditional Japanese gambling game using dice.

Gameplay[edit]

The game uses two standard six-sided dice, which are shaken in a bamboo cup or bowl by a dealer. The cup is then overturned onto the floor. Players then place their wagers on whether the sum total of numbers showing on the two dice will be "Chō" (even) or "Han" (odd). The dealer then removes the cup, displaying the dice. The winners collect their money.

Depending on the situation, the dealer will sometimes act as the house, collecting all losing bets. More often, the players will bet against each other (this requires an equal number of players betting on odd and even) and the house will collect a set percentage of winning bets.


Of the 36 possible outcomes, there are six distinct doubles that result in an even (丁) outcome (e.g., (1,1), (2,2), etc.) and 30 pairings of different numbers: 18 odd sums, and 12 even sums.

Chō-Han outcomes
出目 1
Die face 1r.svg
2
Die face 2b.svg
3
Die face 3b.svg
4
Die face 4r.svg
5
Die face 5b.svg
6
Die face 6b.svg
1
Die face 1r.svg
(1,1)
ピンゾロの丁
(1,2)
イチニの半
(1,3)
サンミチの丁
(1,4)
ヨイチの半
(1,5)
グイチの丁
(1,6)
イチロクの半
2
Die face 2b.svg
(2,1)
イチニの半
(2,2)
ニゾロの丁
(2,3)
サニの半
(2,4)
シニの丁
(2,5)
グニの半
(2,6)
ニロクの丁
3
Die face 3b.svg
(3,1)
サンミチの丁
(3,2)
サニの半
(3,3)
サンゾロの丁
(3,4)
シソウの半
(3,5)
グサンの丁
(3,6)
サブロクの半
4
Die face 4r.svg
(4,1)
ヨイチの半
(4,2)
シニの丁
(4,3)
シソウの半
(4,4)
シゾロの丁
(4,5)
グシの半
(4,6)
シロクの丁
5
Die face 5b.svg
(5,1)
グイチの丁
(5,2)
グニの半
(5,3)
グサンの丁
(5,4)
グシの半
(5,5)
ゴゾロの丁
(5,6)
ゴロクの半
6
Die face 6b.svg
(6,1)
イチロクの半
(6,2)
ニロクの丁
(6,3)
サブロクの半
(6,4)
シロクの丁
(6,5)
ゴロクの半
(6,6)
ロクゾロの丁

Culture[edit]

The game was a mainstay of the bakuto, itinerant gamblers in old Japan, and is still played by the modern yakuza. In a traditional Chou-Han setting, players sit on a tatami floor. The dealer sits in the formal seiza position and is often shirtless (to prevent accusations of cheating), exposing his elaborate tattoos.[1]

Many Japanese films, especially chambara and yakuza movies, feature Chō-Han scenes. It is also a playable minigame in many of the Ryū ga Gotoku (Yakuza) series of video games.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Is Gambling an Important Part of Japanese Culture?". Japan Zone. Retrieved 14 April 2021.
  2. ^ Fletcher, JC (March 10, 2017). "Learning Japanese board game culture from Yakuza 0". Polygon. Retrieved 14 April 2021.

External links[edit]