Chadian constitutional referendum, 2005

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A constitutional referendum was held in Chad on 6 June 2005. The amendments to the constitution were approved by 66% of voters.

Background[edit]

The proposed amendments to the constitution included the removal of two-term limit on the President, the replacement of the Senate with a Cultural, Economic and Social Council and giving the President powers to amend the constitution.

The amendments were proposed by incumbent President Idriss Déby, who was due to complete his second term in 2006. In June 2001 Déby had promised to step down after his second term, stating: I make a public commitment: I will not be candidate at the 2006 presidential election. I will not change the Constitution [...] What remains to do for me in my last mandate, is to prepare Chad for alternation in government.

Campaign[edit]

While Dèby's Patriotic Salvation Movement (MPS) campaigned for "yes", the opposition was divided among those who called for a boycott of the vote and those who called for a "no" vote. The abstensionists allied themselves in the Coordination des Partis politiques pour la Défense de la Constitution (CPDC), an alliance of 24 parties including the Rally for Democracy and Progress and the Union for Renewal and Democracy. The parties that campaigned for a "no" vote included the Front of Action Forces for the Republic and the Rally for the Republic – Lingui.

Results[edit]

Do you support the constitutional law proposal of revision of the Constitution of 31 March 1996 approved by the National Assembly on 23 May 2004?

Choice Votes %
For 1,835,392 65.75
Against 956,180 34.25
Invalid/blank votes 74,810
Total 2,866,382 100
Registered voters/turnout 4,958,156 57.81
Source: African Elections Database

By region[edit]

Regions Registered Voters Voters Invalid Votes Valid Votes For % Against % Turnout
Batha 313,441 203,955 1,943 202,012 137,224 67.93 64,788 32.07 65.1
Borkou-Ennedi-Tibesti 96,945 69,718 756 68,962 52,487 76. 11 16,475 23.89 71.9
Chari-Baguirmi 260,297 150,371 3,478 146,893 92,548 63.00 54,345 37.00 57.8
Guéra 248,861 151,516 1,884 149,632 102,046 68.20 47,586 31.80 60.9
Hadjer-Lamis 328,955 217,327 2,740 214,587 144,936 67.54 69,651 32.46 66.1
Kanem 300,089 159,220 901 158,319 110,726 69.94 47,593 30.06 53.1
Lac 202,651 124,161 1,219 122,942 87,981 71.56 34,961 28.44 61.3
Logone Occidental 268,521 121,017 5,971 115,046 58,292 50.67 56,754 49.33 45.1
Logone Oriental 258,420 138,786 4,530 134,256 76,927 57.30 57,329 42.70 53.7
Mandoul 242,256 171,000 7,523 163,477 102,812 62.89 60,665 37.11 70.6
Mayo-Kebbi Est 323,160 178,833 4,012 174,821 104,279 59.65 70,542 40.35 55.3
Mayo-Kebbi Ouest 195,714 137,366 6,143 131,223 81,593 62.18 49,630 37.82 70.2
Moyen-Chari 243,182 117,095 5,860 111,235 61,923 55.67 49,312 44.33 48.2
Ouaddaï 507,112 384,585 9,038 375,547 274,982 73.22 100,565 13.04 83.7
Salamat 161,162 101,339 849 100,490 68,647 68.31 31,843 31.69 62.9
Tandjilé 253,795 129,590 4,980 124,610 74,045 59.42 50,565 40.58 51.1
Wadi Fira 190,234 137,482 1,026 136,456 95,678 70.12 40,778 29.88 72.3
N'Djamena 563,361 173,021 11,957 161,064 108,266 67.22 52,798 32.78 30.7
Total 4,958,156 2,866,382 74,810 2,791,572 1,835,392 65.75 956,180 34.25 57.8
Source: African Elections Database

Aftermath[edit]

The constitutional amendment allowed Déby to contest the 2006 presidential elections, in which he won a third term.

References[edit]