Challenger brand

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A challenger brand is a brand in an industry where it is neither the market leader nor a niche brand.[1][2] Challenger brands are categorised by a mindset which sees they have business ambitions beyond conventional resources [3] and an intent to bring change to an industry.[4][5]

The establishment brand is the antithesis to the challenger brand, the market leader being the primary example of an establishment brand.[6]

Virgin Atlantic, BrewDog, Tyrells, innocent,[7] Uber and Airbnb [8] are all considered classic examples of a challenger brand. The Challenger Project is a study into challenger brands and how they grow and succeed.[9]

History[edit]

The concept of a challenger brand was first introduced by Adam Morgan in 1999 in the business book, ‘Eating the Big Fish’.[10] In this book three specific criteria for challenger brands were defined; state of market – they are not a market leader nor a niche brand, state of mind – they have ambitions beyond conventional marketing resource, and rate of success - they have experienced significant and rapid growth.[11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kokemuller, Neil. "What Is a Challenger Brand?". smallbusiness.chron.com. Retrieved April 3, 2014. 
  2. ^ Dehnugara, Khurshed (2011). The challenger spirit : organizations that challenge the status quo (First edition. ed.). London: LID. ISBN 978-1-907794-12-4. 
  3. ^ Morgan, Adam (1999). Eating the big fish : how challenger brands can compete against brand leaders. New York: John Wiley. ISBN 0-471-24209-8. 
  4. ^ Ford, Jonathan (2014). The Challenger's Almanac. Sideways. ISSN 2054-9059. 
  5. ^ Hall, Emma. "Size doesn't matter". The Guardian. Retrieved April 2, 2014. 
  6. ^ Morgan, Adam (1999). Eating the big fish : how challenger brands can compete against brand leaders. New York: John Wiley. ISBN 0-471-24209-8. 
  7. ^ McQuater, Katie. "The changing role of the challenger brand: innocent, BrewDog, Tyrells". The Drum. Retrieved April 3, 2014. 
  8. ^ Holden, Mark. "2016: The Year Of The Challenger Brand - Minutehack". Minutehack. 
  9. ^ Scrimgeour, Heidi. "What does it take to go from challenger brand to market leader". The Guardian. Retrieved 1 November 2016. 
  10. ^ Dehnugara, Khurshed (2011). The challenger spirit : organizations that challenge the status quo (First edition. ed.). London: LID. ISBN 978-1-907794-12-4. 
  11. ^ Morgan, Adam (1999). Eating the big fish : how challenger brands can compete against brand leaders. New York: John Wiley. ISBN 0-471-24209-8.