Chamaebatia

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Not to be confused with Rubus subg. Chamaebatus or Chamaebatiaria.
"Mountain misery" redirects here. For other uses, see Misery Mountain (disambiguation).
Chamaebatia
Chamaebatia australis 2.jpg
Chamaebatia australis
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Rosids
Order: Rosales
Family: Rosaceae
Subfamily: Dryadoideae[1]
Genus: Chamaebatia
Benth.
Species

Chamaebatia australis
Chamaebatia foliolosa

Chamaebatia, also known as mountain misery, is a genus of two species of aromatic evergreen shrubs endemic to California. Its English common name derives from early settlers' experience with the plant's dense tangle and sticky, strong-smelling resin.[2][3] They are actinorhizal, non-legumes capable of nitrogen fixation through symbiosis with actinobacteria Frankia.[4][5]

Species[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Potter, D.; et al. (2007). "Phylogeny and classification of Rosaceae". Plant Systematics and Evolution. 266 (1–2): 5–43. doi:10.1007/s00606-007-0539-9. 
  2. ^ a b Karen Wiese (5 February 2013). Sierra Nevada Wildflowers, 2nd: A Field Guide to Common Wildflowers and Shrubs of the Sierra Nevada. FalconGuides. p. 188. ISBN 978-0-7627-8034-1. 
  3. ^ Bibby, Brian; Aguilar, Dugan (2005). Deeper Than Gold: Indian Life in the Sierra Foothills. Heyday. p. 101. ISBN 978-0-930588-96-0. 
  4. ^ Swensen, S.M.; Mullin, B.C. (1997). "The impact of molecular systematics on hypotheses for the evolution of root nodule symbioses and implications for expanding symbioses to new host plant genera". Plant and Soil. 194: 185–192. 
  5. ^ Oakley, B.; North, M.; Franklin, J. F.; Hedlund, B. P.; Staley, J. T. (2004). "Diversity and Distribution of Frankia Strains Symbiotic with Ceanothus in California". Applied and Environmental Microbiology. 70 (11): 6444–6452. doi:10.1128/AEM.70.11.6444-6452.2004. ISSN 0099-2240. PMC 525117Freely accessible. PMID 15528504. Frankia strains symbiotic with Chamaebatia (Rosaceae) were within the same clade as several Ceanothus symbionts 

External links[edit]