Chambranle

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Chambranle (Moravec, Czech Republic)

In architecture and joinery, the chambranle is the border, frame, or ornament, made of stone or wood, that is a component of the three sides round chamber doors, large windows, and chimneys.

When a chambranle is plain and without mouldings, it is called a band, case, or frame. The chambranle consists of three parts; the two sides, called montants, or ports, and the top, called the traverse or supercilium. The chambranle of an ordinary door is frequently called a door-case; of a window, window-frame; and of a chimney, mantle-tree.

History[edit]

In ancient architecture, antepagmenta were garnishings in posts or doors, wrought in stone or timber, or lintels of a window. The word comes from Latin and has been borrowed in English to be used for the entire chambranle, i.e. the door case, or window frame.

References[edit]

  •  This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainChambers, Ephraim, ed. (1728). "Chambranle". Cyclopædia, or an Universal Dictionary of Arts and Sciences. 1 (first ed.). James and John Knapton, et al. p. 190.
  •  This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainChambers, Ephraim, ed. (1728). "Antepagmenta". Cyclopædia, or an Universal Dictionary of Arts and Sciences. 1 (first ed.). James and John Knapton, et al. p. 106.
  • ANTEPAGMENTA, Ancient Library, p. 98

External links[edit]