Chaource cheese

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Chaource
Chaource (fromage) 01.jpg
Country of origin France
Region, town Aube, Yonne
Source of milk Cows
Pasteurised Depends on variety
Texture Soft-ripened
Fat content ~50%
Aging time 2-4 weeks
Certification French AOC 1977
Commons page Related media on Wikimedia Commons

Chaource is a French cheese, originally manufactured in the village of Chaource in the Champagne-Ardenne region.

Chaource is a cow's milk cheese, cylindrical in shape at around 10 cm in diameter and 6 cm in height, weighing either 250 or 450 g. The central pâte is soft, creamy in colour, and slightly crumbly, and is surrounded by a white Penicillium candidum rind.

History[edit]

The cheese has been made in its namesake village since at least the Middle Ages. Cheese is still manufactured there, ranging from small cheese makers to industrial-scale production further away. It is only made in a tightly controlled area in the départements of Aube and Yonne.

Manufacture[edit]

It was recognised as an AOC cheese in 1970, and has been fully regulated since 1977.

The AOC regulations state that:

  • Coagulation must be principally lactic, and last at least 12 hours.
  • Drainage of the cheese must be slow and spontaneous.

Made using a similar recipe to that of Brie, affinage is usually between two and four weeks and the cheese is generally eaten young. The gently-salted central pâte has a light taste and a characteristic 'melt-in-the-mouth' texture. The fat content is a minimum of 50%.

Regulations currently allow both pasteurised or unpasteurised milk to be used during manufacture.

Style[edit]

In her 2010 book Cheese: Exploring Taste and Tradition, Patricia Michelson says: "Chaource has a bitter nutshell-like flavor, with an earthiness reminiscent of the style of the wine here, and you would think it would be a perfect match for the cheese. You should be careful to find the perfect flavor partner, however, because the cheese is also on the salty side."[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Michelson, Patricia (2010). Cheese: Exploring Taste and Tradition. Gibbs M. Smith Inc. p. 59. ISBN 978-1423606512.