Chapel House, Monmouth

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Chapel House
Chapel House, Hereford Road, Monmouth 1.JPG
"the best house in the entire street"
General information
Status Boarding House
Architectural style Georgian
Address Hereford Road
Town or city Monmouth
Country Wales
Coordinates 51°48′55″N 2°42′48″W / 51.8154°N 2.7134°W / 51.8154; -2.7134Coordinates: 51°48′55″N 2°42′48″W / 51.8154°N 2.7134°W / 51.8154; -2.7134
Completed 1752 (1752)
Owner Monmouth School
Website
http://www.monmouthschool.org/en/chapel_house

Chapel House, Hereford Road, Monmouth, Wales, is a Georgian townhouse, built in the early eighteenth century, described by the architectural historian John Newman, as "the best house in the entire street".[1] The house was designated a Grade II* listed building on 27 June 1952.[2] Chapel House is now a boarding house of Monmouth School.

History[edit]

The house is substantially of the early eighteenth century. It has been credited as replacing another building on the same site, although no evidence of this has been found. It was built or improved by the ironmaster William Rea, a former Mayor of Monmouth, around 1720. The windows were replaced and a new entrance doorway was added around 1800, probably by ironmaster David Tanner. Chapel House was restored in 1910 by Humphrey Farran Hall who repaired the panelling. When it was reroofed in the later twentieth century, the large chimney stacks were removed.[2]

Chapel House is now a boarding house of Monmouth School.[2]

Description[edit]

The building is of "seven bays under a hipped roof."[1] It gives the appearance of being two buildings back to back, like several other houses in Monmouth. Curiously, the garden range is larger than the street range.[2] The red-brick walls to the side, which give access to a service court and the garden stretching down to the River Monnow are "contemporary".[1] The interior contains plasterwork and a staircase which "echo Troy House and Great Castle House",[1] although John Newman considers that the quality of the interior fittings surpasses those of either.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Newman, John (2000). 'The Buildings of Wales: Gwent/Monmouthshire. Pevsner Architectural Guides. New Haven: Yale University Press. p. 407.
  2. ^ a b c d "Chapel House, Monmouth". British Listed Buildings. Retrieved 2012-01-25. 
  3. ^ Newman, John (2009). "Buildings in the Landscape". In Gray, Madeline; Morgan, Prys. The Gwent County History, Volume 3: The Making of Monmouthshire, 1536–1780. General ed. Ralph A. Griffiths. Cardiff: University of Wales Press. p. 348.