Charitable Society for Social Welfare

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Charitable Society for Social Welfare (CSSW)
Formation 1990
Founder elite group of Yemeni volunteers and social figures
Founded at Yemen
Headquarters Yemen
Location
  • Yemen
Website http://csswyemen.org/

The Charitable Society for Social Welfare (CSSW) is a Yemen-based Non-governmental organization known for offering charitable and humanitarian services to the masses.[1][2] The CSSW is accredited by the United Nations World Food Program [2] and is also a member of the United Nations Department of Public Information (DPI-NGO).[3]

History[edit]

The Charitable Society for Social Welfare was founded as a charitable non-governmental organization in March 1990 in Yemen by an elite group of Yemeni volunteers and social figures.[4] The CSSW formed branches and committees in the Yemen districts and governorates which numbered up to 23 branches and 26 committees by the year 2008.[5]

In 2015, the Charitable Society for Social Welfare received the ISO 9000-2008 certificate.[6] The CSSW is an active partner with UNICEF,[7] the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR),[8] and the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA).[9]

Services[edit]

The Charitable Society for Social Welfare offers charitable programs such as emergency relief to displaced people and refugees, youth development, social care, health projects and services, woman & child development, education, community development, orphan sponsorship and other related humanitarian services.[10][11]

Controversy[edit]

There is a report in The Washington Post of 2008 claiming that the Charitable Society for Social Welfare (CSSW) was founded by Abdul Majeed al-Zindani, whom the US Treasury Department identified as a "Specially Designated Global Terrorist".[12] The same report also stated that the wanted fugitive and radical Yemeni-American cleric; Anwar Awlaki, served as a vice president for the CSSW during the 1990s.[12]

The CSSW spokesman Jamal Al-Haddi denied the involvement of Abdul Majeed al-Zindani and Anwar Awlaki in the Yemeni CSSW.[13] He denied that Awlaki ever worked for the Yemeni CSSW. He told INTELWIRE in an e-mail that "CSSW has no branches outside the Republic of Yemen. No official or unofficial branch of CSSW in the United States."[14][13] He added that those reports might confuse with a charity that might have a similar name since the Yemeni CSSW has no other branch outside of Yemen. The CSSW spokesman Jamal Al-Haddi is making plans to reach Washington Post to correct the false information already published.[13]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Sina Khalid, "21,000 IDPs in Shabwa in need of urgent aid". yementimes.com. 21 May 2014. Retrieved 7 April 2017. 
  2. ^ a b "TWENTY FIVE NON-GOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS NEWLY ASSOCIATED WITH UN PUBLIC INFORMATION DEPARTMENT, 48 DISASSOCIATED". un.org. Retrieved 7 April 2017. 
  3. ^ "DPI Associated NGOs - As of September 2011" (PDF). csonet.org. Retrieved 7 April 2017. 
  4. ^ "CHARITABLE SOCIETY FOR SOCIAL WELFARE - CSSW YEMEN". fccdotgov.uservoice.com. Retrieved 7 April 2017. 
  5. ^ "The Charitable Society for Social Welfare (CSSW)". mectizan.org. Retrieved 7 April 2017. 
  6. ^ "CSSW got again a quality certificate ISO 9001- 2008 from TUV Company for 2015". mectizan.org. Retrieved 7 April 2017. 
  7. ^ "UNICEF TELEVISION PRESENTS: UNICEF partners in Yemen the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR)". unicef.org. Retrieved 7 April 2017. 
  8. ^ "Charitable Society for Social Welfare, Aden". unhcr.org. Retrieved 7 April 2017. 
  9. ^ "Regional Middle East and North Africa Workshop for Humanitarian Actors Participants List" (PDF). docs.unocha.org. Retrieved 7 April 2017. 
  10. ^ "TWENTY FIVE NON-GOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS NEWLY ASSOCIATED List". peacecorpsonline.org. Retrieved 7 April 2017. 
  11. ^ "Charitable Society for Social Welfare". arab.org. Retrieved 7 April 2017. 
  12. ^ a b Susan Schmidt, "Imam From Va. Mosque Now Thought to Have Aided Al-Qaeda". washingtonpost.com. 27 February 2008. Retrieved 7 April 2017. 
  13. ^ a b c "EXCLUSIVE: U.S. GAVE MILLIONS TO CHARITY LINKED TO AL QAEDA, ANWAR AWLAKI". news.intelwire.com. Retrieved 7 April 2017. 
  14. ^ "CHARITY THAT RECEIVED MILLIONS FROM U.S. DENIES TERRORISM LINKS; INTELWIRE RESPONDS WITH DOCUMENTATION". news.intelwire.com. 7 June 2010. Retrieved 7 April 2017.