Charles Braverman

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Charles "Chuck" Dell Braverman (born March 3, 1944 in Los Angeles County, California) is an American film director, documentary filmmaker and producer. He was nominated for an Academy Award for Documentary Short Subject for his 2000 documentary, Curtain Call; he was also nominated for three Directors Guild of America Awards for Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Documentary (2000, 2001, 2002), winning in 2000 for High School Boot Camp. He has also directed episodes of several major television series, including Beverly Hills, 90210, Melrose Place and Northern Exposure as well as television films such as the Prince of Bel Air.

Among his earliest efforts was a short film called American Time Capsule set to "Beat That #?!* Drum" by famous drummer Sandy Nelson . The film was composed of hundreds of short clips of art and photos (graphics animation) depicting 200 years of American history in two and a half minutes. This film was originally seen on The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour on the CBS network in 1968. The Smothers Brothers commissioned a second film from Braverman about the year 1968 for their final 1969 season. (Both films are now available on the Smothers Brother Comedy Hour DVDs.)

In 1971-1972, Braverman made a 12 minute film about the history of the Beatles called "Braverman's Condensed Cream of the Beatles", first seen on Geraldo Rivera's "Good Night America" television show for ABC. The film used mostly animated graphics, but also features some short live action clips, including a cameo by Rivera interviewing John Lennon about his American citizenship troubles. The film was distributed in 16mm by Pyramid Films in the 1970s, but so far has never been officially released on video.

Braverman produced the opening sequence to the 1973 film Soylent Green in the same style as American Time Capsule.

Personal life[edit]

Braverman graduated from the University of Southern California in 1967.[1]

His brother is actor Bart Braverman.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Notable Alumni, USC School of Cinematic Arts, Accessed March 10, 2008.

External links[edit]