Charles Culling Smith

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Charles Culling Smith, sometimes called Culling Charles Smith (c. 1775[1] – 26 May 1853[2]) was a British politician and courtier.

Family[edit]

He was the son of Charles Smith, Governor of Madras, and nephew of Sir Culling Smith, 1st Baronet.[3]

On 2 August 1799 he married Lady Anne Fitzroy (13 March 1768[4] – 16 December 1844), widow of the Hon. Henry Fitzroy (13 September 1765 – 19 March 1794; fourth son of Charles Fitzroy, 1st Baron Southampton) and only daughter of Garret Wesley, 1st Earl of Mornington.[5] By this marriage he gained two stepdaughters:

His marriage to Lady Anne produced a further two children, a daughter and a son:

Charles Culling Smith and Lady Anne lived in a grace-and-favour residence at Apartment 8, Hampton Court Palace.[15]

Life[edit]

Charles Culling Smith's brother-in-law, the Marquess Wellesley, became Foreign Secretary in the Tory government of Spencer Perceval in 1809, and Culling Smith was appointed Under-Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs on 13 December that year,[16] serving until 27 February 1812.[17] On 1 June 1812 he was one of the Esquires to his brother-in-law the Earl of Wellington at the latter's installation (by proxy) as a Knight Companion of the Order of the Bath.[18]

Culling Smith served as an equerry to the Duke of York, and was present in that capacity at the funeral of Queen Charlotte on 8 December 1818,[19] while his son was there as Page of Honour.[20] On 14 August 1820 Culling Smith and his wife, son, daughter and step-daughters were among the mourners at the funeral of the Duchess of York.[21] His last service as equerry was at the Duke of York's funeral on 20 January 1827.[22]

On 13 March 1827 Culling Smith was made one of the Commissioners of the Board of Customs,[23] but he continued to attend state occasions including the funeral of the Duke of Gloucester on 11 December 1834[24] and the Duke of Wellington on 18 November 1852.[25][26]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Smith, Culling Charles (c 1775-1853) Commissioner of Customs". The National Archives. Retrieved 2017-06-23. 
  2. ^ Denis Larionov & Alexander Zhulin. "Read the eBook The Smith family : being a popular account of most branches of the name-however spelt- from the fourteenth century downwards, with numerous pedigrees now published for the first time by Compton Reade online for free (page 13 of 21)". Ebooksread.com. Retrieved 2017-06-23. 
  3. ^ Arthur Collins, The Baronetage of England, London 1808, p.508
  4. ^ William Jesse, The Life of George Brummell, Esq., commonly called Beau Brummell, London 1844, vol. I, p. 289
  5. ^ Patrick Cracroft-Brennan, Cracroft's Peerage: Mornington, Earl of (I, 1760). Accessed 12 June 2011.
  6. ^ Paul Theroff, An Online Gotha, Part II: Grafton. Accessed 12 June 2011.
  7. ^ a b Patrick Cracroft-Brennan, Cracroft's Peerage: Beaufort, Duke of (E, 1682). Accessed 12 June 2011.
  8. ^ "Charles Culling Smith". Thepeerage.com. 12 February 2012. Retrieved 2017-06-23. 
  9. ^ a b c Jesse, p. 290
  10. ^ "No. 16582". The London Gazette. 10 March 1812. p. 470. 
  11. ^ "No. 17473". The London Gazette. 1 May 1819. p. 755. 
  12. ^ "No. 17886". The London Gazette. 11 January 1823. p. 43. 
  13. ^ "No. 18273". The London Gazette. 1 August 1826. p. 1895. 
  14. ^ "No. 18441". The London Gazette. 12 February 1828. p. 288. 
  15. ^ Sarah E. Parker, Grace & Favour: A handbook of who lived where in Hampton Court Palace 1750 to 1950, Historic Royal Palaces 2005, p.30
  16. ^ Joseph Haydn and Horace Ockerby, The Book of Dignities, London 1894, reprinted Bath 1969, p. 229
  17. ^ 'Alphabetical list of officials', Office-Holders in Modern Britain: Volume 8: Foreign Office Officials 1782-1870 (1979), pp. 58-82. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=16902 Date accessed: 25 June 2011.
  18. ^ "No. 16609". The London Gazette. 2 June 1812. p. 1055. 
  19. ^ "No. 17429". The London Gazette. 8 December 1818. p. 2200. 
  20. ^ "No. 17429". The London Gazette. 8 December 1818. p. 2199. 
  21. ^ "No. 17625". The London Gazette. 19 August 1820. p. 1585. 
  22. ^ "No. 18328". The London Gazette. 24 January 1827. p. 179. 
  23. ^ Haydn and Ockerby, p. 277
  24. ^ "No. 19221". The London Gazette. 16 December 1834. p. 2265. 
  25. ^ "No. 21388". The London Gazette. 6 December 1852. p. 3559. 
  26. ^ "No. 21388". The London Gazette. 6 December 1852. p. 3562.