Charles Francis Adams IV

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Charles Francis Adams IV (May 2, 1910 – January 5, 1999)[1] was a United States Naval Officer and electronics industrialist.

He was the son of Charles Francis Adams III, great-great-great grandson of United States President John Adams, and great-great grandson of President John Quincy Adams. Adams was born in Boston, attended St. Mark's School, graduated from Harvard College in 1932 and attended Harvard Graduate School of Business Administration. Adams was a sixth generation Harvard legacy student (his great-great-great-grandfather, President John Adams graduated from Harvard in 1755).

Adams married twice. His first marriage was to Margaret Stockton Adams by whom he had four children: Abigail, Alison, Charles Francis, and Timothy.[2] He had a total of ten grandchildren and 18 great grandchildren.

Adams was commissioned as an ensign in the Naval Reserve on 23 June 1932 and was promoted to lieutenant (junior grade) on 23 June 1937. He served on active duty during World War II. Adams was promoted to the rank of lieutenant commander on 1 May 1943 and to commander on 1 March 1944. He took command of the destroyer escort USS William Seiverling when she was commissioned on 1 June 1944. The Seiverling conducted anti-submarine operations in the Pacific Theater, was under air attack off Okinawa and supported the liberation of the Philippines.

He served as the first president of the Raytheon Company between 1948 and 1960, and again from 1962 to 1964. He served as its chairman between 1960 and 1962, and again from 1964 until 1972.

Adams was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1959.[3] He was awarded honorary degrees by Suffolk University, Northeastern University, Bates College and Tufts University.

Family tree[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Deaths Elsewhere". St. Louis Post-Dispatch. 1999-01-07. 
  2. ^ "Biography" (PDF). Raytheon. Retrieved 2010-12-05. 
  3. ^ "Book of Members, 1780-2010: Chapter A" (PDF). American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Retrieved 1 April 2011.