Charles Harvey (Indian Army officer)

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Sir Charles Harvey
Born16 July 1888
Eastbourne, Sussex, England
Died11 October 1969 (aged 81)
Allegiance United Kingdom
Service/branch British Army
 British Indian Army
Years of service1908–1946
RankMajor-General
UnitHighland Light Infantry
Central India Horse
Commands heldCentral India Horse (1933–1936)
Wana Brigade (1939–1940)
8th Indian Infantry Division (1940–1942)
Battles/warsWorld War I
World War II
* Anglo-Soviet invasion of Persia
AwardsKnight Bachelor
Companion of the Order of the Bath
Commander of the Royal Victorian Order
Commander of the Order of the British Empire
Military Cross

Major-General Sir Charles Offley Harvey, CB, CVO, CBE, MC (16 July 1888 – 11 October 1969) was an officer in the British Indian Army during World War I and World War II.

He was appointed CVO in 1922 for performing the duties of Assistant Military Secretary to the Prince of Wales during His Royal Highness's Indian Tour.

In the Anglo-Soviet invasion of Persia he commanded 8th Indian Infantry Division, part of Paiforce.

He was knighted in 1946 for his services as Military Adviser in Chief to the Indian State Forces.[1]

He was assistant managing director of the Guinness Brewery with responsibility for personnel 1946-1961 and the founding chairman of the Irish Management Institute 1952-1956. He is commemorated in the IMI's Sir Charles Harvey Awards, conferred on leading MBA graduates in Irish universities.[2]

Army career[edit]

Business career[edit]

He was assistant managing director of the Guinness Brewery with responsibility for personnel from 1946-1961 and the founding chairman of the Irish Management Institute from 1952-1956. He is commemorated in the IMI's Sir Charles Harvey Awards, conferred on leading MBA graduates in Irish universities.[2]

Further reading[edit]

  • Duffy, Martin (2012) The Trade Union Pint: The Unlikely Union of Guinness and the Larkins. Dublin: Liberties Press. ISBN 9781907593468

References[edit]

  • Anon (1946). One More River: The Story of The Eighth Indian Division. Bombay: H.W. Smith, Times of India Press.
  • MacKenzie, Compton (1951). Eastern Epic. Chatto & Windus, London. pp. 623 pages.
  • "Orders of Battle.com". Archived from the original on 2007-07-17. Retrieved 2007-07-28.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "No. 37407". The London Gazette (Supplement). 28 December 1945. p. 3.
  2. ^ Cox, Tom (2002). The Making of Managers: A History of the Irish Management Institute1952-2002. Cork: Oak Tree Press. p. 35. ISBN 9781860762406.

External links[edit]