Charles Hatchett

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Charles Hatchett
Charles Hatchett 2.jpg
Born (1765-01-02)2 January 1765
Died 10 March 1847(1847-03-10) (aged 82)
Chelsea, London
Institutions British Museum
Known for Discovery of niobium

Charles Hatchett FRS FRSE (2 January 1765 – 10 March 1847[1]) was an English chemist who discovered the element niobium.[2]

Life[edit]

Hatchett was born in Long Acre, London the son of John Hatchett, a coach-builder.

In 1800 he founded a chemical works at Chiswick in London.

In 1801 while working for the British Museum in London, Hatchett analyzed a piece of columbite in the museum's collection. Columbite turned out to be a very complex mineral, and Hachett discovered that it contained a "new earth" which implied the existence of a new element. Hatchett called this new element columbium (Cb) in honour of Christopher Columbus, the discoverer of America.[3] On 26 November of that year he announced his discovery before the Royal Society.[4][5] The element was later rediscovered and renamed niobium (its current name).

Later in life, Hatchett quit his job as a chemist to work full-time in his family's coach fabrication business.

Mount Clare, front view

He lived at Mount Clare, Roehampton from 1807-19.[6]

Hatchett died at Bellevue House in Chelsea, London,[7] and is buried at St Laurence's Church, Upton, Slough, the same church where William Herschel is interred.

Publications[edit]

  • Analysis of Magnetical Pyrites (1804)
  • Treatise on Spikenard of the Ancients (1836)

Recognition[edit]

Since 1979, the Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining ("IOM3") (London) has given the Charles Hatchett Award yearly to a noted metallurgist. The award is given to the "author of the best paper on the science and technology of niobium and its alloys."

Family[edit]

On 24 March 1787, he married Elizabeth Collick at St Martin's-in-the-Fields. Their children included:

  1. John Charles Hatchett (bapt 27 January 1788 St Martin's-in-the-Fields)
  2. His daughter, Anna Frederica Hatchett, married the chemist William Thomas Brande.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ GRO Register of Deaths: MAR 1847 III 40 CHELSEA - Charles Hatchett, age unknown
  2. ^ William P. Griffith and Peter J. T. Morris (2003). "Charles Hatchett FRS (1765-1847), Chemist and Discoverer of Niobium". Notes and Records of the Royal Society of London. 57 (3): 299. doi:10.1098/rsnr.2003.0216. JSTOR 3557720. 
  3. ^ Jameson, Robert (1805). "System of Mineralogy, Vol. II.". Edinburgh: Bell and Bradfute (et al.). p. 582. Retrieved 15 February 2015. ... Mr Hatchett found it to contain a metal, which, from its properties, could not be referred to any hitherto known; hence he was of opinion that it should be considered as a new genus, to which he gave the name Columbium, in honour of the discoverer of America. ...' 
  4. ^ Charles Hatchett (1802). "An Analysis of a Mineral Substance from North America, Containing a Metal Hitherto Unknown". Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. 92: 49–66. doi:10.1098/rstl.1802.0005. JSTOR 107114. 
  5. ^ Charles Hatchett (1802). "Eigenschaften und chemisches Verhalten des von Charles Hatchett entdeckten neuen Metalls, Columbium" [Properties and chemical behavior of the new metal, columbium, (that was) discovered by Charles Hatchett]. Annalen der Physik. 11 (5): 120–122. Bibcode:1802AnP....11..120H. doi:10.1002/andp.18020110507. 
  6. ^ Gerhold, Dorian (1997). Villas and Mansions of Roehampton and Putney Heath. Wandsworth Historical Society. pp. 31–33. ISBN 0 905121 05 8. 
  7. ^ http://archives.wellcomelibrary.org/DServe/dserve.exe?dsqIni=Dserve.ini&dsqApp=Archive&dsqCmd=Show.tcl&dsqDb=Catalog&dsqPos=33&dsqSearch=(Sources_guides_used%3D'Tropical%20Medicine')
  8. ^ http://www.royalsoced.org.uk/cms/files/fellows/biographical_index/fells_indexp1.pdf

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]