Charles Hommann

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Charles Hommann (July 25, 1803-?1872) was an American composer. A native of Philadelphia, he was among the first American born composers to produce chamber and orchestral music successfully.[1]

Life[edit]

Charles Hommann was the son of John C. Hommann and his wife Constantia. His father, who had immigrated to the United States from Germany in the 1790s, worked as a music promoter and publisher in Philadelphia.[2] Charles Hommann was one of the first American composers to be trained exclusively in the United States, though his musical training likely came mostly from his German father.[3] Early in his career, Charles held positions at St James's Church and the Third Dutch Reformed Church in Philadelphia.[4]

As a violinist and violist for the Musical Fund Society of Philadelphia, Hommann was exposed to the works of the major European composers of his time.[5] His own music was performed by the Bethlehem Philharmonic Society as well as the Philadelphia Philharmonic Society, and he won a gold medal prize from the latter for his overture in D in 1835.[4]

Hommann moved to New York around 1854, where his music was performed at chamber music concerts given by the New York American-Music Association.[6] Although his music was relatively unknown by the time of his death, he left behind a significant body of orchestral, chamber, and church music that is important for the early history of American musical composition.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Swenson-Eldridge, Joanne, ed. Charles Hommann: Surviving Orchestral Music. Music of the United States of America (MUSA) vol. 17. Madison, Wisconsin: A-R Editions (2007).
  2. ^ Swenson-Eldridge, Joanne, ed. Charles Hommann: Surviving Orchestral Music. Music of the United States of America (MUSA) vol. 17. Madison, Wisconsin: A-R Editions (2007), p. xviii.
  3. ^ Swenson-Eldridge, Joanne, ed. Charles Hommann: Surviving Orchestral Music. Music of the United States of America (MUSA) vol. 17. Madison, Wisconsin: A-R Editions (2007), xix-xx.
  4. ^ a b Swenson-Eldridge, Joanne. Hommann, Charles Grove Music Online. Oxford Music Online (accessed July 25, 2013).
  5. ^ Swenson-Eldridge, Joanne, ed. Charles Hommann: Surviving Orchestral Music. Music of the United States of America (MUSA) vol. 17. Madison, Wisconsin: A-R Editions (2007), p. xxvii.
  6. ^ Swenson-Eldridge, Joanne, ed. Charles Hommann: Surviving Orchestral Music. Music of the United States of America (MUSA) vol. 17. Madison, Wisconsin: A-R Editions (2007), p. li.
  7. ^ Swenson-Eldridge, Joanne, ed. Charles Hommann: Surviving Orchestral Music. Music of the United States of America (MUSA) vol. 17. Madison, Wisconsin: A-R Editions (2007), p. lvii.

External links[edit]