Charles Jones (composer)

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Charles Jones (June 21, 1910 – June 6, 1997) was a Canadian-born music educator and composer of contemporary classical music who lived and worked mainly in the United States.

Early life and education[edit]

Jones was born in Tamworth, Lennox and Addington County, Ontario, Canada. He moved to Toronto at the age of ten, eventually traveling to New York City in 1928. He studied at The Juilliard School, where his primary instructor was Bernard Wagenaar.

Career[edit]

By 1937 Jones had composed a number of classical works; that year a concert by Francis James and his string quartet, consisting entirely of Jones' compositions, was held in Toronto at the Eaton Auditorium.[1]

Jones began teaching at Mills College in California in 1939,[2] where he met and worked with Darius Milhaud. After 1944 he began teaching at The Juilliard School and in 1951 began teaching at the Aspen School of Music in Colorado.[3] During the 1970s he taught composition at the Mannes College of Music.[4][5] His works have been performed by the New York Philharmonic and the National Symphony Orchestra.

The music critic Tim Page and composer Walter Buczynski were among Jones's notable students.

Discography[edit]

  • Charles Jones: New & Historial Recordings, 2005, Albany Music Distribution [6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Lazarevǐc, Gordana (1988). The Musical World of Frances James and Murray Adaskin. University of Toronto Press. p. 141. ISBN 978-0-8020-5738-9.
  2. ^ Jeannie Gayle Pool (19 December 2008). American Composer Zenobia Powell Perry: Race and Gender in the 20th Century. Scarecrow Press. pp. 129, 133. ISBN 978-0-8108-6377-4.
  3. ^ "Music of the United States of America". The Canadian Encyclopedia. by Helmut Kallmann, April 6, 2008
  4. ^ "Charles Jones, a Composer, 86". The New York Times, Jun 10, 1997. by Anthony Tommasini
  5. ^ Careers & opportunities in music. 1964. p. 155.
  6. ^ "Teacher-Composers in a Class by Themselves". The Washington Post. Oct 9, 2005

External links[edit]