Charles McKeen

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Charles Milton McKeen
Charles McKeen - (ca. 1921 - 1935) (16680978570).jpg
Member of the Legislative Assembly of Alberta
In office
July 18, 1921 – August 22, 1935
Preceded by George Barker
Succeeded by Albert Bourcier
Constituency Lac Ste. Anne
Personal details
Born May 10, 1885
Fredericton, New Brunswick
Died November 7, 1972(1972-11-07) (aged 87)
Mayerthorpe, Alberta
Political party United Farmers
Occupation politician

Charles Milton McKeen (May 10, 1885 – November 7, 1972) was a provincial politician from Alberta, Canada. He served as a member of the Legislative Assembly of Alberta from 1921 to 1935 sitting with the United Farmers caucus in government.

Political career[edit]

McKeen ran for a seat to the Alberta Legislature in the Lac Ste. Anne electoral district as a United Farmers of Alberta candidate in the 1921 Alberta general election. He defeated two other candidates with a landslide majority to pick up the seat for his party.[1]

McKeen ran for a second term in the 1926 Alberta general election. He faced two other candidates including former MLA George Barker. McKeen held his seat with another landslide majority.[2]

The 1930 Alberta general election would see McKeen returned to office for his third term by acclamation.[3]

McKeen ran for a fourth term in the 1935 Alberta general election. He would be defeated finishing second by Social Credit candidate Albert Bourcier in a very close four way race that was decided on the fourth vote count.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Lac Ste. Anne Official Results 1921 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved April 29, 2010. 
  2. ^ "Lac Ste. Anne Official Results 1926 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved April 29, 2010. 
  3. ^ "Lac Ste. Anne Official Results 1930 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved April 29, 2010. 
  4. ^ "Lac Ste. Anne Official Results 1935 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved April 29, 2010. 

External links[edit]