Charles Merrill Hough

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Charles Merrill Hough
Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit
In office
August 21, 1916 – April 22, 1927
Appointed byWoodrow Wilson
Preceded byEmile Henry Lacombe
Succeeded byAugustus Noble Hand
Judge of the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York
In office
June 27, 1906 – September 5, 1916
Appointed byTheodore Roosevelt
Preceded bySeat established by 34 Stat. 202
Succeeded byMartin Thomas Manton
Personal details
Born
Charles Merrill Hough

(1858-05-18)May 18, 1858
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
DiedApril 22, 1927(1927-04-22) (aged 68)
New York City, New York
EducationDartmouth College (A.B.)
read law

Charles Merrill Hough (May 18, 1858 – April 22, 1927) was a United States Circuit Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit and previously was a United States District Judge of the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York. He was the son of brigadier general Alfred Lacey Hough (1826-1908) and Mary Jane Merrill. He married Ethel Powers in 1906. They bore two children: Helen Anastasia Hough (1905-1978) and John Newbold Hough (1906-2000). Hough's most historically memorable judicial ruling came in 1908 when he quashed a libel suit brought by U.S. government for President Theodore Roosevelt against a newspaper critical of the way the administration handled Panama Canal startup. U.S. Supreme court upheld Hough’s ruling unanimously in 1911.


Education and career[edit]

Born on May 18, 1858, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Hough received an Artium Baccalaureus degree in 1879 from Dartmouth College and read law in 1883. He entered private practice in New York City, New York from 1884 to 1906.[1]

Federal judicial service[edit]

Hough was nominated by President Theodore Roosevelt on June 20, 1906, to the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York, to a new seat authorized by 34 Stat. 202. He was confirmed by the United States Senate on June 27, 1906, and received his commission the same day. His service terminated on September 5, 1916, due to his elevation to the Second Circuit.[1]

Hough was nominated by President Woodrow Wilson on August 15, 1916, to a seat on the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit vacated by Judge Emile Henry Lacombe. He was confirmed by the Senate on August 21, 1916, and received his commission the same day. He was a member of the Conference of Senior Circuit Judges (now the Judicial Conference of the United States) in 1926. His service terminated on April 22, 1927, due to his death in New York City.[1]

References[edit]

Sources[edit]

Legal offices
Preceded by
Seat established by 34 Stat. 202
Judge of the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York
1906–1916
Succeeded by
Martin Thomas Manton
Preceded by
Emile Henry Lacombe
Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit
1916–1927
Succeeded by
Augustus Noble Hand