Charles Tilly

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Charles Tilly
Charles Tilly (1929).jpg
BornMay 27, 1929
DiedApril 29, 2008 (2008-04-30) (aged 78)
Alma mater
SpouseLouise A. Tilly
Children4
Scientific career
FieldsSocial Science
Sociology
Political science
History
InstitutionsUniversity of Delaware
Harvard University
University of Toronto
University of Michigan
The New School
Columbia University
Institute for Social and Economic Research and Policy
Academic advisorsBarrington Moore Jr.
Doctoral studentsBarry Wellman, Ann Mische, Daniel Nexon. John M. Merriman

Charles Tilly (May 27, 1929 – April 29, 2008[1]) was an American sociologist, political scientist, and historian who wrote on the relationship between politics and society. He was a professor of history, sociology, and social science at the University of Michigan from 1969 to 1984 before becoming the Joseph L. Buttenwieser Professor of Social Science at Columbia University.

He has been described as "the founding father of 21st-century sociology"[1] and "one of the world's preeminent sociologists and historians."[2] He published widely across topics such as urban sociology, state formation, democracy, social movements, labor, and inequality.[3] He was an influential proponent of large-scale historical social science research. The title of Tilly's 1984 book Big Structures, Large Processes, Huge Comparisons is characteristic of his particular approach to social science research.

Early life and education[edit]

Tilly was born in Lombard, Illinois (near Chicago). His parents were Naneth and Otto Tilly, Welsh-German immigrants.[3] He graduated from York Community High School in 1946.[3] He graduated from Harvard University in 1950 with a Bachelor of Arts magna cum laude. He served in the U.S. Navy as a paymaster of an amphibious squadron during the Korean War. Tilly completed his Doctor of Philosophy in Sociology at Harvard in 1958.[4][3]

While at Harvard, he was a student in the Department of Social Relations during the "Harvard revolution" in social network analysis.[5][6] Tilly was a teaching assistant to Pitirim Sorokin, who along with Talcott Parsons and George C. Homans was considered by many in the profession to be among the world's leading sociologists.[7] But every time Sorokin heard Tilly's ideas he would say something like "Very interesting Mr. Tilly but I do think Plato said it better."[8]

Tilly eventually turned to Barrington Moore Jr. and George C. Homans to supervise his dissertation. But Tilly never failed to say that Sorokin was a great person even though Tilly eschewed any great person theory of history.[7]

Academic career[edit]

Charles Tilly taught at the University of Delaware (1956-1962), Harvard University (1963-1966), the University of Toronto (1965-1969), the University of Michigan (1969-1984), The New School (1984-1996), and Columbia University (1996-2008). At Michigan, Tilly was professor of history 1969–1984, professor of sociology 1969–1981, and the Theodore M. Newcomb Professor of Social Science 1981–1984. At the New School from 1984 to 1996 he was Distinguished Professor of sociology and history 1984-1990 and University Distinguished Professor 1990-1996. in 1996, he was the Joseph L. Buttenwieser Professor of Social Science.[9]

Over the course of his career, Tilly wrote more than 600 articles and 51 books and monographs.[10][11] His most highly cited books are: the edited volume The Formation of National States in Western Europe (1975), From Mobilization to Revolution (1978), Coercion, Capital, and European States, AD 990-1990 (1990), Durable Inequality (1998), and Dynamics of Contention (2001).[12]

Academic work[edit]

Tilly's academic work covered multiple topics in the social sciences and influenced scholarship in disciplines outside of sociology, including history and political science. He is considered a major figure in the development of historical sociology, the early use of quantitative methods in historical analysis, the methodology of event cataloging, the turn towards relational and social-network modes of inquiry, the development of process- and mechanism-based analysis, as well as the study of: contentious politics, social movements, the history of labor, state formation, revolutions, democratization, inequality, and urban sociology.

At Columbia, along with Harrison White, Tilly played a key role in the emergence of the New York School of relational sociology.[9]

Urban sociology[edit]

In the 1960s and 1970s, Tilly studied migration to cities, and was an influential theorist about urban phenomena and treating communities as social networks.[13] In 1968 Tilly presented his report on European collective violence to the Eisenhower Commission, a body formed under the Johnson administration to assess urban unrest amidst the Civil Rights Movement. The report was included in Vol. 1 of Violence in America, a collection edited by scholars on the staff of the commission.[14] As informed by his studies of contentious politics in 19th-century Europe, and the present violence in the U.S., his interest in cities and communities became closely linked with his passion for the study of both social movements and collective violence.[15]

An approach to the study of societies[edit]

Tilly outlined the distinctive approach he would use in his research on the state and capitalism in Big Structures, Large Processes, Huge Comparisons (1984).[16]

In this work, he argued against eight common ideas in social theory:[17]

  • The view that societies are not connected with each other
  • The view that collective behavior can be explained in terms of the mental state of individuals
  • The view that societies can be understood as blocs, lacking parts or components
  • The view that societies evolve through a fixed stages (an assumption common in modernization theory)
  • The view that differentiation is a master process, common to all societies as they modernize
  • The view that quick differentiation generates disorder
  • The view that rapid social change causes behaviors that are not considered normal, such as crime
  • The view that "illegitimate" and "legitimate" kinds of conflict originate in different processes

On the positive side, he argued in favor of "historically grounded huge comparisons of big structures and large processes", while being careful to consider the temporal and spatial context of explanations.[18] The approach Tilly laid out has sometimes been called historical sociology or comparative historical analysis.[19] More substantively, Tilly sketched a research program focused on two broad macro processes, capitalism development and the formation of modern states.[20]

Social movements and contentious politics[edit]

One of the themes that runs through a large number of Tilly's work is the collective actions of groups that challenge the status quo. Tilly dedicated two books, on France and Great Britain, to the topics: The Contentious French. Four Centuries of Popular Struggle (1986) and Popular Contention in Great Britain, 1758–1834 (1995).[21]

Later on, he co-authored two influential books on social movements: Dynamics of Contention (2001), with Doug McAdam and Sidney Tarrow; and Contentious Politics (2006) with Sidney Tarrow.[22] Tilly also provided an overview of social movement, from their origins in the eighteen century to the early twenty-first century, in Social Movements, 1768-2004 (2004).[23]

Tilly argues that social movements were a new novel phenomenon that emerged in the West in the mid-nineteenth century and that social movements are characterized by three features: (1) a campaign - a "sustained, organized public effort" aimed at making collective demands from public authorities; (2) a repertoire of contention - the use of various forms of action, such as public meetings, demonstrations, and so on; and (3) a public display of certain qualities, specifically worthiness, unity, numbers, and commitment.[24]

In his work with McAdam and Tarrow, Tilly seeks to advance a new agenda for the study of social movements. First, he and his co-authors claim that various of forms of contention politics, including revolutions, ethnic mobilization, democratization should be connected to each other. Second, he argued for an analysis that puts the focus squarely on causal mechanisms and that the goal of research should be the identification of "recurrent mechanisms and processes." Specifically, in Dynamics of Contention Tilly and his co-authors focus on mechanism such as brokerage, category formation, and elite defection.[25]

State formation[edit]

Tilly's 1975 edited volume The Formation of National States in Western Europe was influential in the state formation literature.[26] In the volume and in subsequent works, including the 1990 book Coercion, Capital, and European States, Tilly advances a theory of state formation whereby warfare and competition prompted state formation.[27][28][29] Tilly famously remarked, "War made the state, and the state made war." Per Tilly, the state developed largely as a result of "state-makers" who sought to extract resources from the people under their control so they could continue fighting wars. Rulers who were better able to extract the means of warfare were more likely to survive and conquer the territory of other rulers whereas rulers who were unable to effectively extract resources were more likely to see their political units decline.[30] Thus, the modern state emerged as the dominant organizational form through natural selection and competition.[31] Tilly's theory of state formation is considered dominant in the state formation literature.[31][32][33]

Tilly's work on state formation was influenced by Otto Hintze, as well as Tilly's long-time friend Stein Rokkan.[26] According to Tilly, through war-making the state is able to monopolize physical violence, enabling the state to title any other entity practicing violence as unlawful. Tilly's theories however have been claimed to hold a Eurocentric syntax, as such a monopolization did not take place in the post-colonial world due to the heavy interference of foreign actors.

Other scholars have disputed this theory,[34] and argued that his argument does not extend to Africa[35][36] or East Asia.[37] He has also been criticized for not specifying what he considers to be a state.[38]

Democracy and democratization[edit]

Tilly wrote several books on democracy late in his career. These include Contention and Democracy in Europe, 1650-2000 (2004) and Democracy (2007).[39]

In these works, Tilly argued that political regimes should be evaluated in terms of four criteria:[40]

  • Breadth: the extent to which citizens enjoy rights
  • Equality: the extent of inequality within the citizenry
  • Protection: the extent to which citizens are protected from arbitrary state action
  • Mutually binding consultation: the extent to which state agents are obligated to deliver benefits to citizens

The more a regime had these qualities, the more democratic it is.

In his work on democracy, Tilly showed an interest in exploring the link between state capacity and democratization.[41] He distinguished between different paths countries followed, based on whether they developed state capacity before, at the same time, or after they democratized.[42] He concluded that powerful states can block or subvert democracy, and that weak states run the danger of civil war and fragmentation. Thus, he thought that a middle path, in which steps to build the state and democracy were matched, as exemplified by the United States, is the more feasible one.[43]

Awards and honors[edit]

Tilly received several awards, including:

He also received honorary doctorates from Erasmus University of Rotterdam in 1983, the Institut d'Etudes Politiques of University of Paris in 1993, the University of Toronto in 1995, the University of Strasbourg in 1996, the University of Geneva in 1999, the University of Crete in 2002, the University of Quebec at Montreal in 2004 and the University of Michigan in 2007.[46]

He was awarded the Chevalier de l'Ordre des Palmes Académiques (Knight of the Order of Academic Palms) by the French government.

In 2001, Columbia's sociology graduate students named Tilly the Professor of the Year.

The Charles Tilly Award for Best Book, of the Collective Behavior and Social Movements section of the American Sociological Association was names after Tilly in 1986.[47]

The Charles Tilly Best Article Award has been awarded by the Section on Comparative and Historical Sociology of the American Sociological Association since 2005.[48]

After his death, numerous special journal issues, conferences, awards and obituaries appeared in his honor.[49] The Social Science Research Council hosted a 2008 conference, co-sponsored with Columbia University and the Institute for Social and Economic Research and Policy, in his honor: "A Celebration of the Life and Works of Charles Tilly"[50][51] At this conference the SSRC announced the Charles Tilly and Louise Tilly Fund for Social Science History.[52] The conference had presentations from notable sociologists including: Craig Calhoun, Harrison White, Doug McAdam, Immanuel Wallerstein, William Sewell, Jack Goldstone, Sidney Tarrow, Barry Wellman and Viviana Zelizer. A 2010 special issue of Social Science History was dedicated to (the work of) Charles Tilly,[53] as was a 2010 special issue of The American Sociologist.[54] The latter was edited by Andreas Koller, and included contributions by George Steinmetz, Neil Gross, Jack A. Goldstone, Kim Voss, Rogers Brubaker, Mustafa Emirbayer, and Viviana Zelizer. In 2010, the journal Theory and Society also published a special issue on "Cities, States, Trust, and Rule" dedicated to the work of Tilly.[55]

Death[edit]

Charles Tilly died in the Bronx on April 29, 2008, from lymphoma.[1] As he was fading in the hospital, he got one characteristic sentence out to early student Barry Wellman: "It's a complex situation."[13] In a statement after Tilly's death, Columbia University president Lee C. Bollinger stated that Tilly "literally wrote the book on the contentious dynamics and the ethnographic foundations of political history".[11] Adam Ashforth of The University of Michigan described Tilly as "the founding father of 21st-century sociology".[1]

See also[edit]

Partial bibliography[edit]

  • The Vendée: A Sociological Analysis of the Counter-revolution of 1793 (1964)
  • "Collective Violence in European Perspective." Pp. 4–45 in Violence in America: Historical and Comparative Perspectives. A report to the National Commission on the Causes and Prevention of Violence. Volume 1. Eds. Hugh Davis Graham and Ted Robert Gurr. (1969)
  • "Clio and Minerva." Pp. 433–66 in Theoretical Sociology, eds. John McKinney and Edward Tiryakian. (1970)
  • "Do Communities Act?" Sociological Inquiry 43: 209–40. (1973)
  • An Urban World. (ed.) (1974).
  • The Formation of National States in Western Europe (ed.) (1975)
  • From Mobilization to Revolution (1978)
  • As Sociology Meets History (1981)
External video
video icon Charles Tilly interview: origins, Vendee 1 - part of interview with Charles Tilly by Daniel Little, at University of Michigan - Dearborn, December 15, 2007.
video icon Charles Tilly interview: origins, Vendee 2 - part of interview with Charles Tilly by Daniel Little, at University of Michigan - Dearborn, December 15, 2007.
video icon Charles Tilly interview: causal mechanisms - part of interview with Charles Tilly by Daniel Little, at University of Michigan - Dearborn, December 15, 2007.
video icon Charles Tilly interview: concepts and state formation - part of interview with Charles Tilly by Daniel Little, at University of Michigan - Dearborn, December 15, 2007.
video icon Charles Tilly interview: new issues in historical sociology - part of interview with Charles Tilly by Daniel Little, at University of Michigan - Dearborn, December 15, 2007.
video icon Charles Tilly interview: social science "paradigm" - part of interview with Charles Tilly by Daniel Little, at University of Michigan - Dearborn, December 15, 2007.
video icon Charles Tilly interview: individualism and cognitive science - part of interview with Charles Tilly by Daniel Little, at University of Michigan - Dearborn, December 15, 2007.
video icon Charles Tilly interview: big questions - part of interview with Charles Tilly by Daniel Little, at University of Michigan - Dearborn, December 15, 2007.
  • Big Structures, Large Processes, Huge Comparisons (1984)
  • War Making and State Making as Organized Crime, In Bringing the State Back In, edited by Peter Evans, et al., 169–87. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 1985, PDF Online
  • The Contentious French (1986)
  • Coercion, Capital, and European States, AD 990–1990 (1990)
  • Coercion, Capital, and European States, AD 990–1992 (1992)
  • European Revolutions, 1492–1992 (1993)
  • Cities and the Rise of States in Europe, A.D. 1000 to 1800 (1994)
  • Popular Contention in Great Britain, 1758–1834 (1995)
  • Roads from Past to Future (1997)
  • Work Under Capitalism (with Chris Tilly, 1998)
  • Durable Inequality (1998)
  • Transforming Post-Communist Political Economies (1998)
  • Dynamics of Contention (with Doug McAdam and Sidney Tarrow) (2001)
  • The Politics of Collective Violence (2003)
  • Contention & Democracy in Europe, 1650–2000 (2004)
  • Social Movements, 1768–2004 (2004)
  • From Contentions to Democracy (2005)
  • Identities, Boundaries, and Social Ties (2005)
  • Trust and Rule (2005)
  • Why? (2006)
  • Oxford Handbook of Contextual Political Analysis (2006)
  • Contentious Politics (with Sidney Tarrow) (2006)
  • Regimes and Repertoires (2006)
  • Democracy (2007)
  • Credit and Blame (2008)
  • Contentious Performances (2008)
  • Social Movements, 1768–2008, 2nd edition (with Lesley Wood, 2009)

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Martin, Douglas (May 2, 2008). "Charles Tilly, 78, Writer and a Social Scientist, Is Dead". New York Times. Retrieved March 3, 2013.
  2. ^ "Paid Notice: Deaths – Tilly, Charles". query.nytimes.com. Retrieved June 23, 2015.
  3. ^ a b c d Walsh-Russo, Cecelia; Castañeda, Ernesto (September 25, 2018). "Charles Tilly". Oxford Bibliographies: 9780199756384–0156. doi:10.1093/obo/9780199756384-0156.
  4. ^ Martin, Douglas. "Charles Tilly, 78, Writer and a Social Scientist, Is Dead". The New York Times. Retrieved February 8, 2016.
  5. ^ "Institute of Latin American Studies at Columbia University - ILAS Tribute - Charles Tilly". Archived from the original on July 26, 2014. Retrieved June 23, 2015.
  6. ^ Derman, J. (2012). Max Weber in Politics and Social Thought: From Charisma to Canonization. Cambridge University Press. p. 225. ISBN 9781139577076. Retrieved June 23, 2015.
  7. ^ a b Castañeda, Ernesto, and Cathy Lisa Schneider. “Introduction,” pp. 1-22,in Ernesto Castañeda and Cathy Lisa Schneider (eds.), Collective Violence, Contentious Politics, and Social Change: A Charles Tilly Reader. New York, NY: Routledge, p. 2.
  8. ^ Charles Tilly, Big Structures, Large Processes, Huge Comparisons. New York: Russell Sage Foundation, 1984, p 28.
  9. ^ a b c d "Archived copy" (PDF). hsr-trans.zhsf.uni-koeln.de. Archived from the original (PDF) on September 27, 2013. Retrieved August 1, 2022.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  10. ^ Castañeda, Ernesto, and Cathy Lisa Schneider. “Introduction,” pp. 1-22,in Ernesto Castañeda and Cathy Lisa Schneider (eds.), Collective Violence, Contentious Politics, and Social Change: A Charles Tilly Reader. New York, NY: Routledge, pp. 2-3; Mack, Arien. "Charles Tilly, 1929–2008." Social Research: An International Quarterly 75, 2 (2008): v-vi.
  11. ^ a b Bollinger, Lee C. (April 29, 2008). "President Bollinger's Statement on the Passing of Professor Charles Tilly". Columbia University. Retrieved June 22, 2014.
  12. ^ Based on Google Scholar (July 16, 2022); Charles Tilly (ed.), The Formation of National States in Western Europe. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1975; Charles Tilly, From Mobilization to Revolution. Reading, Mass.: Addison Wesley, 1978; Charles Tilly, Coercion, Capital, and European States, AD 990-1990. Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1990; Charles Tilly, Durable Inequality. Berkeley, Calif.: University of California Press, 1998; McAdam, Doug, Sidney Tarrow and Charles Tilly, Dynamics of Contention. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2001.
  13. ^ a b Barry Wellman (May 1, 2008). "Chuck Tilly, the urbanist". SOCNET Archives. Retrieved June 22, 2014.
  14. ^ Tilly, Charles. 1969. "Collective Violence in European Perspective." Pp. 4–45 in Violence in America, edited by Hugh Graham and Tedd Gurr. Washington: U.S. Government Printing Office
  15. ^ Tilly, Charles. 1988. "Misreading, then Rereading, Nineteenth-Century Social Change." Pp. 332–58 in Social Structures: A Network Approach, edited by Barry Wellman and SD Berkowitz. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  16. ^ Charles Tilly, Big Structures, Large Processes, Huge Comparisons. New York: Russell Sage Foundation, 1984.
  17. ^ Charles Tilly, Big Structures, Large Processes, Huge Comparisons. New York: Russell Sage Foundation, 1984, pp. 11-12, Chs. 2 and 3.
  18. ^ Charles Tilly, Big Structures, Large Processes, Huge Comparisons. New York: Russell Sage Foundation, 1984, p. 145.
  19. ^ Philip Abrams, Historical Sociology. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1982, p. 303; Lynn Hunt, “Charles Tilly’s Collective Action,” pp. 244-75, in Theda Skocpol (ed.), Vision and Method in Historical Sociology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1984; J. Goldstone, "Comparative historical analysis and knowledge accumulation in the study of revolutions," pp. 41-90, n J. Mahoney & D. Rueschemeyer (eds.), Comparative Historical Analysis in the Social Sciences. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003.
  20. ^ Charles Tilly, Big Structures, Large Processes, Huge Comparisons. New York: Russell Sage Foundation, 1984, p. 15.
  21. ^ Tilly, Charles, The Contentious French. Four Centuries of Popular Struggle. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1986; Tilly, Charles, Popular Contention in Great Britain, 1758–1834. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1995.
  22. ^ McAdam, Doug, Sidney Tarrow and Charles Tilly, Dynamics of Contention. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2001; Tilly, Charles and Sidney Tarrow, Contentious Politics. Boulder, Col.: Paradigm Publisher, 2006.
  23. ^ Charles Tilly, Social Movements, 1768-2004. Boulder, Col.: Paradigm Publishers, 2004.
  24. ^ Charles Tilly, Social Movements, 1768-2004. Boulder, Col.: Paradigm Publishers, 2004, pp. 3-4.
  25. ^ McAdam, Doug, Sidney Tarrow and Charles Tilly, Dynamics of Contention. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2001.
  26. ^ a b Ertman, Thomas (2017), Strandsbjerg, Jeppe; Kaspersen, Lars Bo (eds.), "Otto Hintze, Stein Rokkan and Charles Tilly's Theory of European State-building", Does War Make States?: Investigations of Charles Tilly's Historical Sociology, Cambridge University Press, pp. 52–70, ISBN 978-1-107-14150-6
  27. ^ Kaspersen, Lars Bo; Strandsbjerg, Jeppe, eds. (2017). Does War Make States?: Investigations of Charles Tilly's Historical Sociology. Cambridge University Press. doi:10.1017/9781316493694. ISBN 978-1-107-14150-6.
  28. ^ Tilly, Charles (1990). Coercion, Capital, and European States, AD 990–1990. Cambridge, Mass., USA: B. Blackwell. ISBN 978-1-55786-368-3.
  29. ^ Spruyt, Hendrik (1994). The Sovereign State and Its Competitors: An Analysis of Systems Change. Princeton University Press. pp. 30–33. ISBN 9780691029108.
  30. ^ Schenoni, Luis L. (2021). "Bringing War Back in: Victory and State Formation in Latin America". American Journal of Political Science. 65 (2): 405–421. doi:10.1111/ajps.12552. ISSN 1540-5907. S2CID 221552058.
  31. ^ a b Gorski, Philip; Sharma, Vivek Swaroop (2017), Strandsbjerg, Jeppe; Kaspersen, Lars Bo (eds.), "Beyond the Tilly Thesis: "Family Values" and State Formation in Latin Christendom", Does War Make States?: Investigations of Charles Tilly's Historical Sociology, Cambridge University Press, pp. 98–124, ISBN 978-1-107-14150-6
  32. ^ Ertman, Thomas (1997). Birth of the Leviathan: Building States and Regimes in Medieval and Early Modern Europe. Cambridge University Press. p. 4. ISBN 978-0-521-48427-5.
  33. ^ Bagge, Sverre (2014). Cross and Scepter: The Rise of the Scandinavian Kingdoms from the Vikings to the Reformation. Princeton University Press. p. 4. ISBN 978-1-4008-5010-5.
  34. ^ Abramson, Scott F. (2017). "The Economic Origins of the Territorial State". International Organization. 71 (1): 97–130. doi:10.1017/S0020818316000308. ISSN 0020-8183.
  35. ^ Herbst, Jeffrey (1990). "War and the State in Africa". International Security. 14 (4): 117–139. doi:10.2307/2538753. ISSN 0162-2889. JSTOR 2538753. S2CID 153804691.
  36. ^ Herbst, Jeffry (2000). States and Power in Africa. Princeton University Press. ISBN 0-691-01027-7.
  37. ^ Huang, Chin-Hao; Kang, David (2021). "State Formation in Korea and Japan, 400-800 CE: Emulation and Learning, not Bellicist Competition". International Organization. 76: 1–31. doi:10.1017/S0020818321000254. S2CID 236554884. SSRN 3776268.
  38. ^ Bagge, Sverre (2019). State Formation in Europe, 843–1789: A Divided World. Routledge. p. 22. ISBN 978-0-429-58953-9. Tilly never specifies exactly what he regards as a state or how he arrives at the numbers respectively of 1,000 and 500, but he clearly regards the various fiefs in which large parts of continental Europe were divided as states.
  39. ^ Charles Tilly, Contention and Democracy in Europe, 1650-2000. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2004; Charles Tilly, Democracy. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2007.
  40. ^ Charles Tilly, Democracy. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2007, pp. 14-15.
  41. ^ Charles Tilly, Contention and Democracy in Europe, 1650-2000. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2004, pp. 45-54; Charles Tilly, Democracy. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2007, pp. 15-23.
  42. ^ Charles Tilly, Democracy. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2007, pp. 161-65.
  43. ^ Charles Tilly, Democracy. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2007, pp. 184, 163-64.
  44. ^ "Charles Tilly".
  45. ^ "2009 | Charles Tilly".
  46. ^ ISERP. "Charles Tilly Remembered". Archived from the original on October 5, 2008. (Archived 29 April 2008 press release from ISERP, Columbia University.)
  47. ^ "Awards – Collective Behavior & Social Movements".
  48. ^ "Charles Tilly Best Article Award – Comparative and Historical Sociology".
  49. ^ "Tributes to Charles Tilly -- Memorials to Credit & Blame » Annotated Links to Charles Tilly Resources". essays.ssrc.org. Retrieved June 23, 2015.
  50. ^ "SSRC » Albert O. Hirschman Prize » Award Ceremonies". ssrc.org. Retrieved June 23, 2015.
  51. ^ "Contention, Change, and Explanation: A Conference in Honor of Charles Tilly". h-net.org. Retrieved June 23, 2015.
  52. ^ "Tilly Fund for Social Science History — Fellowships & Grants — Social Science Research Council". ssrc.org. Archived from the original on July 25, 2014. Retrieved June 23, 2015.
  53. ^ Social Science History Volume 34, Number 3, Fall 2010 http://ssh.dukejournals.org/content/34/3.toc
  54. ^ "Remembering Charles Tilly". The American Sociologist. Springer. 41 (4). December 2010. JSTOR i40044197.
  55. ^ "Theory and Society, Volume 39, Issue 3 - Springer". link.springer.com. Retrieved June 23, 2015.

Further reading[edit]

  • Funes, María J. (ed.), Regarding Tilly: Conflict, Power, and Collective Action. Lanham, MD: University Press of America, 2016.
  • Gentile, Antonina, and Sidney Tarrow. "Charles Tilly, globalization, and labor's citizen rights." European Political Science Review 1#3 (2009): 465–493.
  • Hunt, Lynn. "Charles Tilly's Collective Action," pp. 244–275, in Theda Skocpol (ed.), Vision and Method in Historical Sociology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1984.
  • Kaspersen, Lars Bo and Jeppe Strandsbjerg (eds.). Does War Make States? Investigations of Charles Tilly's Historical Sociology New York: Cambridge University Press, 2017.
  • Krinsky, John, and Ann Mische. "Formations and formalisms: Charles Tilly and the paradox of the actor." Annual Review of Sociology 39 (2013): 1-26.
  • Lichbach, Mark. “Charles Tilly’s Problem Situations: From Class and Revolution to Mechanisms and Contentious Politics.” Perspectives on Politics 8, 2(2010)L 543–49
  • Tarrow, Sidney. "The people's two rhythms: Charles Tilly and the study of contentious politics. A review article." Comparative Studies in Society and History 38:3 (1996): 586–600.
  • Tarrow, Sidney. "Charles Tilly and the Practice of Contentious Politics." Social Movement Studies 7:3 (2008): 225-46.

External links[edit]