Charles Trieschmann

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Charles Raymond Trieschmann (October 2, 1920 - February 23, 2015) was an American author, photographer, movie producer and attorney.

Biography[edit]

Born in Crossett, Arkansas, Trieschmann's parents Adam and Laura moved the family to Evanston, where he attended grade school and high school. He attended Stanford University where he was included in the 1940-41 Yearbook of Stanford Writing[1] and graduated from the School of Social Sciences in 1942.

He later attended John Marshall Law School and qualified as an attorney.

During World War II he enlisted in the U.S. Naval Reserve and was honourably discharged as Captain.

His fiction writing appeared in magazines including Collier’s[2] and Esquire[3]

Photographer[edit]

He was a keen traveler and freelanced as a member of the Black Star photo agency. Life magazine of May 1953 included his imagery of sufferers of yaws in an essay ’Dreadful diseases: some progress is made in healing Africa’s sick’.[4] His photograph of an amputee youth with a crutch playing football on a beach in Morocco[5] was chosen in 1955 by Edward Steichen for the world-touring Museum of Modern Art exhibition The Family of Man,[6] seen by 9 million visitors.

He contributed photographs to books including The World Children Live In (1957),[7] Emerging African Nations and Their Leaders: Volume II Malawi to Zambia (1964)”[8] Holidays and customs (1976)[9] and Disabled village children : a guide for community health workers, rehabilitation workers, and families (1987).[10]

Cinema[edit]

Trieschmann directed and produced the 1974 American drama film Two, starring Sara Venable, which was adapted from a previously unpublished novel written by him. A book of the movie was released in the same year by Dell.

Death[edit]

Retired to Cincinnati, Trieschmann died in Chicago of brain cancer. His parents Adam and Laura and brother Ralph had pre-deceased him.

References[edit]

  1. ^ The Stanford Daily Wednesday April 30, 1941 Stanford University, California. p.2
  2. ^ Charles Trieschmann "The Warrior”. In Collier’s Magazine June 24, 1944
  3. ^ Charles Trieschmann “Nina Polka” Esquire November, 1951; VOL. XXXVI No. 5.
  4. ^ ’Dreadful diseases: some progress is made in healing Africa’s sick’ LIFE, 4 May 1953, Vol. 34, No. 18, ISSN 0024-3019, Time Inc.
  5. ^ Baldwinson, Tony (2012), Unacknowledged traces : exploring through photographic records the self-organisation of disabled people in England from the 1920s to the 1970s, TBR Consulting, p. 65, ISBN 978-0-9572606-2-7
  6. ^ DU, November 1955, Zürich, Switzerland: Conzett & Huber
  7. ^ Kathryn Jackson, Alda Raulin The World children live in. Morristown, N.J: Silver Burdett., 1957. p.143
  8. ^ Evans, L. ., & Varela, H. (1964). Emerging African Nations and Their Leaders: Volume II (Malawi to Zambia). Yonkers: Educational Heritage, Inc.
  9. ^ Holidays and customs. Chicago: World Book-Childcraft International, 1976
  10. ^ Werner, David (1987), Disabled village children : a guide for community health workers, rehabilitation workers, and families (1st ed.), Hesperian Foundation, ISBN 978-0-942364-06-4