Charles Turner (water polo)

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Charles Turner
Personal information
Born (1953-09-03) 3 September 1953 (age 63)
Ardrossan, North Ayrshire, Scotland
Height 186 cm (73 in) (1984)
Weight 92 kg (203 lb) (1984)
Sport
Sport Water polo
Event(s) Men's team
Achievements and titles
Olympic finals 1976 Summer Olympics
1984 Summer Olympics
1984 Summer Olympics

Charles Turner (born 9 September 1953) is an Australian water polo player. He represented Australia as a member of the Australia men's national water polo team at three Olympics: 1976 Summer Olympics, 1980 Summer Olympics and 1984 Summer Olympics. He later became a sport administrator working for the New South Wales Institute of Sport.

Personal[edit]

Charles has two children named Francesca and Harry, and his favourite niece is Grace. Turner was born in Ardrossan in North Ayrshire, Scotland, on 9 September 1953.[1][2] He later moved to Adelaide, South Australia.[1] He has a brother, Michael Turner, who also represented Australia in water polo at the 1980 Summer Olympics and 1984 Summer Olympics.[2][3][4] He is 186 centimetres (73 in) tall and weighs 92 kilograms (203 lb).[2]

Water polo[edit]

Turner became a member of the South Australia state representative team in 1968.[1] He later joined the New South Wales representative team.[5] In 1970, he was a member of the Adelaide-based Payneham water polo team.[6]

Turner was a member of the Australia men's national water polo team. He had 504 caps with the team.[5] He competed but did not win a medal at the 1976 Summer Olympics, 1980 Summer Olympics and 1984 Summer Olympics.[3] At the 1976 Games, his team finished 11th, and only had two matches, a 4–4 draw against Mexico and an 8–2 defeat of Iraq, that did not end in a loss.[7] At the 1980 Games, his team finished seventh, beating Bulgaria 9–5, Italy 5–4, Greece 4–2 and Sweden 9–2, and drawing Romania 4–4 along the way.[7] At the 1984 Games, his team finished fifth, beating Japan 15–2, drawing Italy 8–8, losing to Germany 10–6 and Yugoslavia 9–6, drawing Spain 10–10, beating the Netherlands 8–7 and losing to the United States 12–7 along the way.[7] He represented Australia at the 1993 World Cup, where Australia finished third and earned their first medal of any kind at a major men's international tournament.[5]

Turner coached the Australian Institute of Sport men's water polo team from 1985 to 1996.[5][8] He was the first top-level water polo coach to work at the Australian Institute of Sport.[9] In this role, he coached future women's national water polo team coach Greg McFadden. After two years on the team, Turner named McFadden as his assistant coach.[8]

Sport administration[edit]

Turner has served the chief executive of the New South Wales Institute of Sport[10] since 2003.[5] He has also served as the New South Wales Institute of Sport's Deputy Directory and Group Manager for High Performance Sport.[5] In 1996, he became the vice president of the World Coaches Association.[5] In 2004, he became a member of the Carbine Club of New South Wales, a water polo club, and would go on to become the organisation's secretary.[5]

Recognition[edit]

Turner was inducted into the Australian Water Polo Hall of Fame in 2009.[11] He has also been inducted into the New South Wales Hall of Fame and Path of Champions.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Hall of Fame Induction: Charles Turner" (PDF). Australia: Australian Water Polo. Archived from the original (PDF) on 24 April 2012. Retrieved 20 February 2012. 
  2. ^ a b c "Charles Turner Biography and Olympic Results | Olympics at". Sports-reference.com. Retrieved 2012-02-19. 
  3. ^ a b "Australian Olympic Committee: Water Polo". Corporate.olympics.com.au. Retrieved 2012-02-19. 
  4. ^ "Michael Turner Biography and Olympic Results | Olympics at". Sports-reference.com. Retrieved 2012-02-19. 
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Charles Turner" (PDF). New South Wales, Australia: The Carbine Club of NSW. Retrieved 20 February 2012. [permanent dead link]
  6. ^ "SA Water Polo Inc – SAWPI History". Sawaterpolo.asn.au. 2008-04-04. Archived from the original on 17 March 2012. Retrieved 2012-02-19. 
  7. ^ a b c "Australian Olympic Committee: Charles Turner". Corporate.olympics.com.au. Retrieved 2012-02-19. 
  8. ^ a b "Sports Coach :: Greg McFadden: No watering down coach's approach". Ausport.gov.au. Archived from the original on 27 March 2012. Retrieved 2012-02-19. 
  9. ^ Bloomfield, John (2004). Australia's Sporting Success : the inside Story. Sydney: UNSW Press. p. 153. ISBN 0-86840-582-5. OCLC 476327215. 
  10. ^ Forrest, Brad (4 February 2010). "Prince takes a bow". St. George and Sutherland Shire Leader. New South Wales, Australia. dc6b2aafea477c58c248837ba9dc21b26d0598b.  He held this position in 2010.
  11. ^ "Australian Water Polo Inc.: Hall of Fame & Service Awards". Australianwaterpolo.com.au. Archived from the original on 17 March 2012. Retrieved 2012-02-19.