Charlie Oatway

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Charlie Oatway
Charlie Oatway.JPG
Personal information
Full name Anthony Philip David Terry Frank Donald Stanley Gerry Gordon Stephen James Oatway[1]
Date of birth (1973-11-28) 28 November 1973 (age 43)[1]
Place of birth Hammersmith, England
Height 5 ft 7 in (1.70 m)
Playing position Midfielder
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1993–1994 Yeading ? (?)
1994–1995 Cardiff City 32 (0)
1995–1997 Torquay United 67 (1)
1997–1999 Brentford 57 (0)
1998 Lincoln City (loan) 3 (0)
1999–2007 Brighton & Hove Albion 224 (8)
2007–2009 Havant & Waterlooville 6 (0)
Total 389 (9)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.

Anthony Philip David Terry Frank Donald Stanley Gerry Gordon Stephen James Oatway (born 28 November 1973), more commonly known as Charlie Oatway, is an English former footballer. Oatway retired from the professional game in August 2007. He was assistant manager and a player at Havant & Waterlooville but departed the club in June 2009. He is currently an analyst with Shanghai Shenhua, continuing his integral role within Gus Poyet's management team having previously worked with him at Brighton, Sunderland, AEK Athens and Real Betis Balompié.

Career[edit]

Born in Hammersmith, London,[1] Oatway spent eight years at Brighton & Hove Albion and eventually became club captain. He has also played for Cardiff City, Torquay United and Brentford, (at all three clubs he played under manager Eddie May) as well as a brief loan spell at Lincoln City. At Brentford he scored once, his strike coming in a 3-0 win over West Bromwich Albion in the League Cup.[2]

Following yet another serious injury, Oatway retired from playing with immediate effect on 2 August 2007. Oatway's career at Brighton was successful. He won the Third Division championship in 2001, the Second Division championship in 2002 and was a Second Division play-off champion in 2004.[3] Oatway currently acts as a sporting liaison for "Albion in the Community" offering coaching sessions at Brighton Hove & Sussex Sixth Form College.

Following his professional retirement, Oatway joined Conference South team Havant & Waterlooville as a player and assistant manager. He departed the Hawks in June 2009[4] following disagreements about his financial agreement with the club: the club ceased payments for his playing contract at the end of the 2008–09 season though a new contract solely as assistant manager was offered.[5] Oatway was appointed first team coach at Brighton & Hove Albion by manager Gus Poyet on 1 December 2009.

On 29 November 2016, Oatway joined Chinese Super League side Shanghai Greenland Shenhua, as a member of coaching staff to Gus Poyet.[6]

Personal life[edit]

Oatway's full name is Anthony Philip David Terry Frank Donald Stanley Gerry Gordon Stephen James Oatway. The reason behind this rather unusual name is the fact that both his parents were Queens Park Rangers fans, and decided to give their son the names of QPR's entire 1973 first team squad.[7] When his parents told his aunt the proposed name, she said "he'd look a right Charlie", and the name stuck.[8] His 17-year-old son, also called Charlie, currently plays for Brighton's development squad joining prior to the 2012/13 season.[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Hugman, Barry J. (2005). The PFA Premier & Football League Players' Records 1946–2005. Queen Anne Press. p. 463. ISBN 1-85291-665-6. 
  2. ^ "Off colour Albion get stung by killer Bees; Brentford 3 West Bromwich Albion 0 (Brentford win 4-2 on aggregate).". thefreelibrary.com. 19 August 1998. Retrieved 12 August 2013. 
  3. ^ "Oatway Forced To Retire". Brighton & Hove Albion F.C. Retrieved 4 August 2007. [dead link]
  4. ^ "Oatway leaves Hawks". The News. 25 June 2009. Retrieved 24 July 2009. 
  5. ^ "Hawks hit back after Oatway exit shock". The News. 25 July 2009. Retrieved 24 July 2009. 
  6. ^ "古斯塔沃·波耶特(Gustavo Poyet)正式出任上海绿地申花足球队主教练". (in Chinese) Shanghai Greenland Shenhua Official Website. 29 November 2016. 
  7. ^ Bandini, Paolo; Dart, James (11 April 2007). "The most unusual footballer names ever". The Guardian. Retrieved 4 August 2007. 
  8. ^ "Quotes; Lewis/Ranieri". BBC Sport. 26 April 2004. Retrieved 6 August 2007. 
  9. ^ "Two more young guns help Rocks shape up for season". Chichester Observer. 15 July 2009. Retrieved 24 July 2009. 

External links[edit]