Charm City Circulator

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Charm City Circulator
Charm City Circulator logo.svg
CCC Orion VII 1206 Purple.jpg
A 2011-model OBI Orion VII 07.501 EPA10 HEV "BRT"
ParentBaltimore City Department of Transportation
Commenced operationJanuary 11, 2010
LocaleBaltimore, Maryland
Service areaDowntown Baltimore
Service typeDowntown circulator bus service
RoutesBus: 4
Water Taxi: 3
StopsBus: 101
Water Taxi: 3
Fleet26
See fleet roster below
Fuel typeClean diesel, Hybrid
WebsiteOfficial website

The Charm City Circulator (CCC or Downtown Circulator) is a privately funded, public transit downtown circulator shuttle service giving riders connection to historic sites, parking, and businesses throughout downtown Baltimore for free. The newest system in Maryland was established in 2008, but did not begin inaugural service until January 11, 2010 because of funding issues. The system operates four routes on major streets throughout downtown. The system also connects to the city's water taxi and MTA Maryland.

History[edit]

The Charm City Circulator started as a plan by former mayor Sheila Dixon to make Baltimore an eco-friendly city and utilize transport throughout Downtown without the patron spending a dime. The plan was to launch three routes connecting across the inner-city, but delays in bus delivery caused routes to be implemented over 18 months rather than all at once. Service is seven days-a-week, with ten-minute intervals between buses. On January 11, 2010; the Orange Route became the pilot service for the Charm City Circulator travelling east-west via Pratt Street/Lombard Street, Central Avenue, and Baltimore Street. As soon as three months after service of the first line begin, the "CCC" reached the 100,000 riders milestone. Nearly six months later on June 4, the Purple Route began service travelling north-south via Charles Street & St. Paul/Light Streets. The much anticipated Green Route recently began service just outside downtown connecting City Hall to Johns Hopkins Medical Center via Broadway, Fleet Street, and President Street. On August 15, 2011, the city of Baltimore received $1.6 million in federal funds to expand service to Fort McHenry in early 2012. The "Banner Route" or Blue Route was intended to relieve congestion and make it easier for visitors to get to/from the famous landmark in time for the War of 1812 bicentennial celebration.

Bus routes[edit]

Route Numbered stops Major streets Tourist connection MTA connection Began service
Green: Johns Hopkins to City Hall via Fells Point 101–126
  • Rail: (M)
  • Bus: 5, 7, 8, 10, 13, 15, 19, 20, 23, 26, 31, qb40, qb46, qb47, qb48, 91, 104, 105, 110, 115, 119, 120, 150, 160, 410, 411, 420
November 1, 2011
Orange: Harbor East to Hollins Market 201–228
  • Rail: (L), (M), (MARC/Camden Line)
  • Bus: 1, 7, 8, 10, 11, 14, 17, 19, 20, 27, 31, 35, qb46, qb48, 61, 64, 110, 119, 120, 160, 310, 320, 410, 411, 420
January 11, 2010
Purple: Federal Hill to 33rd Street via Penn Station 301–327
  • Rail: (L), (M), (MARC/Penn Line)
  • Bus: 1, 3, 5, 7, 8, 10, 11, 13, 15, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 26, 31, 35, 36, qb40, qb46, qb48, 61, 64, 91, 103, 105, 110, 115, 119, 120, 150, 160, 164, 310, 320, 410, 411, 420
June 4, 2010 (33rd Street Expansion October 5, 2015)
Banner: Inner Harbor to Fort McHenry 401–420
  • Bus: 1, 3, 7, 10, 11, 19, 31, 35, 61, 64, 103, 119, 164
June 4, 2012
Legend = (L): Light Rail, (M): Metro Subway

Water taxi harbor connector routes[edit]

Destinations Bus connection Frequency Year begin
  • Maritime Park to Tide Point
  • Canton Waterfront Park to Tide Point
  • CCC: Green
  • MTA: 13
  • Maritime Park to Tide Point
    • 15 minutes
  • Canton Waterfront Park to Tide Point
    • 30 minutes
2011
  • Harbor East to Harbor View
  • CCC: Banner, Green
2012 (TBD)[needs update]

Bus fleet roster[edit]

Year Photo Manufacturer Model Length Fuel or propulsion Powertrain Fleet series
(qty.)
Notes
Active Roster
2011-12 CCC Orion VII 1206 Purple.jpg OBI
[1][2][3]
Orion VII 07.501 EPA10 HEV "BRT" 40 feet (12 m) Diesel-electric hybrid Cummins ISB6.7 BAE Systems HybriDrive system 1201–1213
(13)
  • Arrived November 2011
  • Replaced 0901-0913
  • 1209-1213 wrapped in "Banner Route" decals
2020 Nova Bus[4] LFS TL40102A Diesel CumminsL9 Allison B3400xFE (12)
  • 6 buses from NovaBus entering into service as of February 2020.
  • 6 additional buses from NovaBus to enter service in Fall 2020.[4]
Retired Roster
2009 CCC Designline 0913.jpg DesignLine ECOSaver IV 30 feet (9.1 m) Hybrid Capstone C30 BRI AC motor 0901–0913
(13)
  • Retired in spring 2012 due to reliability issues[5][6]
2011 CCC Vanhool A300.jpg Van Hool A300L 40 feet (12 m) Diesel Cummins ISL9 Voith D864.5 1101–1105
(5)
  • Bus #1105 has three doors
  • Engine compartment placed in left-center of vehicle
  • As of 2020, all Van Hool buses are retired.
  • All current and future buses in fleet are hybrid or clean-diesel vehicles under the Cleaner, Greener Baltimore Initiative's plan.
  • Charm City Circulator (formerly operated by Veolia) bus yard located at 1400 Cherry Hill Road. Two blocks from Cherry Hill light rail stop and connection to MTA bus routes 27, 29, and 51.
  • As of February 2020, the Charm City Circulator is putting new buses into service manufactured by NovaBus, according to the Baltimore Sun, the City of Baltimore plans to order new buses to fully replace the Orion buses that was put into service in 2012.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Circulator marks a year on the streets". Baltimore Sun. January 11, 2011. Retrieved October 9, 2011.
  2. ^ "Preview!: Charm City Circulator (City of Baltimore) 2011 Orion VII NG BRT #1202". WMATAvids. September 25, 2011. Retrieved October 14, 2011.
  3. ^ "Daimler showcases Orion buses with added features, technology". metro-magazine. October 5, 2011. Retrieved October 14, 2011.
  4. ^ a b c Campbell, Colin. "Baltimore's Charm City Circulator adding six new buses next week to remedy persistent service issues". baltimoresun.com. Retrieved 2020-02-04.
  5. ^ "For the Charm City Circulator, 'growing pains are inevitable'". Baltimore Business Journal. August 26, 2010. Retrieved October 9, 2011.
  6. ^ "Circulator marks a year on the streets". Baltimore Sun. January 11, 2011. Retrieved October 9, 2011.

External links[edit]