Chasmosaurinae

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Chasmosaurines
Temporal range: Late Cretaceous, 78–66 Ma
Chasmosaurus belli RTM 01.jpg
Chasmosaurus belli skeleton, Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology
Scientific classification e
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Clade: Dinosauria
Order: Ornithischia
Family: Ceratopsidae
Subfamily: Chasmosaurinae
Lambe, 1915
Type species
Chasmosaurus belli
Lambe, 1902
Subgroups
Synonyms
  • Ceratopsinae?
    Marsh, 1888 sensu Abel, 1919
  • Eoceratopsinae
    Lambe, 1915

Chasmosaurinae is a subfamily of ceratopsid dinosaurs. They were one of the most successful groups of herbivores of their time. Chasmosaurines appeared in the early Campanian, and became extinct, along with all other non-avian dinosaurs, during the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event. Broadly, the most distinguishing features of chasmosaurinae are prominent brow horns and long frills lacking long spines; centrosaurines generally had short brow horns and relatively shorter frills, and often had long spines projecting from their frills. Chasmosaurines are currently known definitively from rocks in western Canada, the western United States, and northern Mexico.

Classification[edit]

Below is the phylogeny of Caleb Brown and Donald Henderson (2015):[1]

Chasmosaurinae

Vagaceratops irvinensis

Kosmoceratops richardsoni

Chasmosaurus belli

Chasmosaurus russeli

Mojoceratops perifania

Agujaceratops mariscalensis

Utahceratops gettyi

Pentaceratops sternbergii

Bravoceratops polyphemus

Coahuilaceratops magnacuerna

Anchiceratops ornatus

Arrhinoceratops brachyops

Triceratopsini

Regaliceratops peterhewsi

Eotriceratops xerinsularis

Ojoceratops fowleri

Titanoceratops ouranos

Nedoceratops hatcheri

Torosaurus latus

Torosaurus utahensis

Triceratops prorsus

Triceratops horridus

Below is the result of a phylogenetic analysis by Mallon et al., following the traditional epiparietal homology scheme from their description of Spiclypeus shipporum. Bravoceratops and Eotriceratops were removed because it was found that they decrease resolution in their analysis because of the authors' new interpretation of epiparietal configurations. Regaliceratops was not resolved as a member of the Triceratopsini.[2]

Chasmosaurinae

Kosmoceratops richardsoni

Vagaceratops irvinensis

Spiclypeus shipporum

Pentaceratops sternbergii

Utahceratops gettyi

Agujaceratops mariscalensis

Mojoceratops perifania

Chasmosaurus belli

Chasmosaurus russelli

Coahuilaceratops magnacuerna

Anchiceratops ornatus

Regaliceratops peterhewsi

Arrhinoceratops brachyops

Triceratopsini

Ojoceratops fowleri

Titanoceratops ouranos

Nedoceratops hatcheri

Torosaurus latus

"Torosaurus" utahensis

Triceratops prorsus

Triceratops horridus

Timeline[edit]

21st century in paleontology20th century in paleontology19th century in paleontology2030s in paleontology2020s in paleontology2010s in paleontology2000s in paleontology1990s in paleontology1980s in paleontology1970s in paleontology1960s in paleontology1950s in paleontology1940s in paleontology1930s in paleontology1920s in paleontology1910s in paleontology1900s in paleontology1890s in paleontology1880s in paleontology1870s in paleontology1860s in paleontologySpiclypeusRegaliceratopsTorosaurusPolyonaxAgathaumasTriceratopsTitanoceratopsNedoceratopsTatankaceratopsOjoceratopsEotriceratopsVagaceratopsUtahceratopsEoceratopsPentaceratopsMojoceratopsMercuriceratopsKosmoceratopsJudiceratopsCoahuilaceratopsChasmosaurusBravoceratopsArrhinoceratopsAnchiceratopsAgujaceratops21st century in paleontology20th century in paleontology19th century in paleontology2030s in paleontology2020s in paleontology2010s in paleontology2000s in paleontology1990s in paleontology1980s in paleontology1970s in paleontology1960s in paleontology1950s in paleontology1940s in paleontology1930s in paleontology1920s in paleontology1910s in paleontology1900s in paleontology1890s in paleontology1880s in paleontology1870s in paleontology1860s in paleontology

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Brown, Caleb M.; Henderson, Donald M. (June 4, 2015). "A new horned dinosaur reveals convergent evolution in cranial ornamentation in ceratopsidae". Current Biology. 25 (online): 1641–8. doi:10.1016/j.cub.2015.04.041. PMID 26051892. 
  2. ^ Jordan C. Mallon, Christopher J. Ott, Peter L. Larson, Edward M. Iuliano and David C. Evans (2016). "Spiclypeus shipporum gen. et sp. nov., a Boldly Audacious New Chasmosaurine Ceratopsid (Dinosauria: Ornithischia) from the Judith River Formation (Upper Cretaceous: Campanian) of Montana, USA". PLoS ONE. 11 (5): e0154218. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0154218. PMC 4871577Freely accessible. PMID 27191389. 

External links[edit]