List of Lucky Luke albums

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A list of comics albums featuring the character Lucky Luke, written and drawn by Morris.

La Mine d'or de Dick Digger[edit]

La Mine d'or de Dick Digger
(Dick Digger's Gold Mine)
Cover of the Belgian edition
Date1949
SeriesLucky Luke
PublisherDupuis
Creative team
WritersMorris
ArtistsMorris
Original publication
Published inLe Journal de Spirou
Issues
  1. 478 - #502
    #505 - #527
Date of publication1947
LanguageFrench
ISBN2-8001-1441-X

La Mine d'or de Dick Digger, written and drawn by Morris, is an album containing two stories from serial publication in Le Journal de Spirou during the year 1947, namely La Mine d'or de Dick Digger and Le Sosie de Lucky Luke. Together they were released as the first official Lucky Luke hardcover album in 1949 and in English by Cinebook in 2014 as Dick Digger's Gold Mine.

Stories[edit]

La Mine d'or de Dick Digger[edit]

Lucky Luke and Jolly Jumper meet an old friend, the prospector Dick Digger in ecstasy over a recent gold ore discovery in the West Hills, en route to register his gold mine claim in Nugget City. He has hidden his map in a bottle of rum. Celebrating loudly at a saloon, Digger is identified as a target of robbery by two hardened criminals. During the night while sleeping in a room above a saloon, he has his gold and his plan stolen by two bandits. He tries to defend himself but he gets a bad blow on the head and loses his memory. The following day, Lucky Luke and Jolly Jumper take up pursuit following their trail. Luke finds the bandits' trail and manages to steal the bottle containing the plan. The bandits launch themselves on its track and, after a mad chase, take again the bottle. But Lucky Luke played a trick on them: he drew a false map that sent the desperados in a trap. He and the Nugget City Sheriff capture the bandits. Dick Digger recovers his memory during a face-to-face meeting with the band leader and goes off with his family to dig for the gold.

Le Sosie de Lucky Luke[edit]

Luke discovers he causes fear in the inhabitants of a town, because he is remarkably similar to a notorious felon named Mad Jim, currently in prison and scheduled for hanging. Spotted by two thugs, Luke is ambushed and knocked out, with the thugs replacing him with the doppelgänger in a drunken sheriff's jail cell, in order to get a share of Mad Jim's loot. Lucky Luke, awake, tries to persuade the sheriff's sheriff that he is not Mad Jim but it is a waste of time. Fortunately, the executor fails when he has to hang him and Lucky Luke just manages to escape. He gets on the trail of Mad Jim and his accomplices, Stan Strangler and Charley Chick. He succeeds quite easily in capturing them but they manage to escape thanks to two Indians who do not like Lucky Luke's present (a harmonica) and make him prisoner. Fortunately, Lucky Luke escapes following an argument between the two acolytes. He manages to capture the three bandits again and brings them back to Silverbrook. Again, Mad Jim manages to escape. The final confrontation between him and Lucky Luke takes place at the local saloon. This confrontation ends in the death of Mad Jim, who is therefore one of the rare people that Luke kills during a duel. In the following albums, he never again kills a single man during a duel, contenting himself with disarming his adversaries using his colt or by putting them in a state of harm in another way.

Rodéo[edit]

Rodéo
(Rodeo)
Date1951
SeriesLucky Luke
PublisherDupuis
Creative team
WritersMorris
ArtistsMorris
Original publication
Published inSpirou magazine
Issues
  1. 528 - #545
    #546 - #566
    #567 - #584
Date of publication1948 - 1949
LanguageFrench
ISBN2-8001-0141-5

Rodéo, written and drawn by Morris, is an album containing three stories from serial publication in Spirou magazine during 1948–49, namely Grand rodéo ("Grand Rodeo"), Lucky Luke à Desperado City ("Lucky Luke in Desperado City") and La ruée vers l'or de Buffalo Creek ("The Buffalo Creek Gold Rush"). Together they were released as the second Lucky Luke hardcover album in 1951, and in English by Cinebook as the 54th in 2015.

Stories[edit]

Grand Rodéo[edit]

Lucky Luke arrives in Navajo City, a town about to stage a rodeo. In the saloon of the place he meets Cactus Kid, a thug who attacks him, but is no match for Luke. The rodeo takes place the next day. Presumed the favourite to win by the town and himself, Cactus Kid realises he may have met his match in Lucky Luke, and resorts to foul play, sabotaging Luke's lasso and then trying to cut the strap of his saddle. This time, Lucky Luke takes him by the wayside and beats him up. Luke wins the rodeo but Cactus Kid takes revenge by grabbing the prize money. The sheriff and several men run after him, but it is Lucky Luke who succeeds in capturing him.

Lucky Luke à Desperado City[edit]

Lucky Luke arrives in Desperado City, where two desperados, the Pistol Brothers, appear to be the source of local terror. They quickly confront Luke who captures them during a stagecoach attack. However, the town is flooded with bandits, unwilling to accept the enforcement of the law, and Lucky Luke finds himself attacked from every direction. The undertaker is the boss of all these people who free the Pistol brothers and succeed in capturing Lucky Luke. He was barely saved from hanging by a panicked herd of cattle. Lucky Luke then succeeds in neutralizing the undertaker (who benefits from the lawlessness), then the Pistol brothers. He then renames the city "Justice City".

La ruée vers l'or de Buffalo Creek[edit]

Lucky Luke spots a sleeping prospector, and decides to play a practical joke on him, planting a little gold nugget in the pan. The prospector awakes to his greatest dream come true, and when Lucky Luke chases the euphoric gold digger and tries to reveal the joke, the prospector shoots at him, speeding into town to stake his claim and shout the news. The madness of a gold rush follows, bringing changes to Buffalo Creek of a greater scale than Lucky Luke expects, and when he makes a final attempt to explain the truth, he finds himself arrested. Unable to remedy the situation from inside a jail cell, Luke must let the situation run its course, a change coming undone as quickly as it started, as an expert examines the gold nugget and realizes that it was discovered in California fifty years ago. Buffalo Creek then empties of its inhabitants, becoming a ghost town.

Arizona[edit]

Arizona
Date1949
SeriesLucky Luke
PublisherDupuis
Creative team
WritersMorris
ArtistsMorris
Original publication
Published inSpirou magazine
Date of publication1951
LanguageFrench
ISBN978-2800114439

Arizona is a Lucky Luke comic by Morris, it was the third album in the series and was printed by Dupuis in 1951 and in English by Cinebook in 2015. It contains two stories - Arizona 1880 and Lucky Luke contre Cigarette Cæsar.

Stories[edit]

Arizona 1880[edit]

Two bandits attack a stagecoach. Lucky Luke immediately sets out on their trail. In the Nugget City saloon, he faces a tough guy, Big Belly, who cheats at cards. The fat man, defeated, runs away leaving a spur, proving that he would probably be one of the stagecoach's attackers. Lucky Luke follows him and arrives at a hut guarded by a sentinel of Mexican origin. Luke easily neutralizes him and then attacks the two men (including Big Belly) who held the stagecoach up. The fight is tough, but the two bandits end up defeating him and taking him prisoner. Immediately afterwards, Cheat, who appears to be the chief, betrays Big Belly and his Mexican accomplice and flees after having tied them up. Luke manages to break away thanks to Jolly Jumper and immediately sets off in pursuit of Cheat which he succeeds (not without difficulty) in capturing.

Lucky Luke contre Cigarette Cæsar[edit]

Lucky Luke sets off in pursuit of Cigarette Cæsar, who has just escaped from prison and who has crossed the Mexican border. Cigarette Cæsar is charged with, among other things, armed robbery and murder. In Mexico, the bandit is struggling to get rid of his pursuer who still manages to find him. However, he manages to arm himself and find an accomplice, a Mexican knife thrower. This one sends to Lucky Luke a message on the door of his room signed by Cigarette Cæsar. He gives him an appointment the next day at 5 a.m. in the plaza where the settlement of accounts will take place. The next day, Lucky Luke goes to the plaza where bullfights take place. The competitors are particularly incompetent. Lucky Luke also enters the arena. Cigarette Cæsar takes the opportunity to shoot him in the back but Luke was careful to make himself a bulletproof. Unarmed, Cæsar is captured by Lucky Luke, who brings him back to the American border.

Sous le ciel de l'Ouest[edit]

Sous le ciel de l'Ouest
(Under the Western Sky)
Cover of the Belgian edition
Date1952
SeriesLucky Luke
PublisherDupuis
Creative team
WritersMorris
ArtistsMorris
Original publication
Published inSpirou magazine
Date of publication1952
LanguageFrench
ISBN978-2800114446

Sous le ciel de l'Ouest is a Lucky Luke comic by Morris. It is the fourth album in the series and was printed by Dupuis in 1952 and in English by Cinebook in 2015 as Under a Western Sky. It contains three short stories - Le Retour de Joe la Gachette ("The Return of Joe the Trigger"), Jours de round–up ("Round-up days"), and Le Grand combat ("The Great Fight").

Stories[edit]

Le Retour de Joe la Gachette[edit]

Lucky Luke meets a man calling himself John the Philanthropist. When he arrives in town, he hears of a horse race with $5,000 prize money. He enrolls Jolly Jumper in it, but is robbed on the day of the race. In the race, John the Philanthropist somehow escapes his competitors, passing one after the other, but the rain falls and John's black horse is shown to be in reality Jolly Jumper painted black. On his faithful horse, Lucky Luke chases after John, who has meanwhile fled with the money from the race bets and catches him, having him shaved by the barber of the city, which reveals that it is in fact by Joe the Trigger, famous bandit. Finally, all is well which ends well.

Jours de round-up[edit]

Arriving near a ranch, Lucky Luke hears about the round-up, a custom of cattle ranches where the best cowboys capture the oxen. But when an entire herd is captured, the owner of the "-3" brand ranch is missing 200 heads. Lucky Luke investigates and learn that two associated bandits have stolen these heads and changed the brands on them to "4B" to go unnoticed. But he stops them and the missing cattle are brought back to the ranch.

Le Grand combat[edit]

A strong, illiterate man escapes the wrath of a bull and meets Lucky Luke. The latter then offers to put him in boxing combat against a formidable champion, known for "killing" his victims by beating them up, Killer Kelly. The challenger, called by Lucky Luke "Battling Belden", trains hard for the match, and the fight quickly becomes event-driven. Bets on Belden are increasing, so that a dishonest bookmaker, Slippery Nelson, wants to make Belden lose the match by kidnapping Rosita, his fiancée. Luke finds her and brings her back to the boxer who wins the match and the 10,000 dollar reward. As for Nelson, he ends up incarcerated.

Lucky Luke contre Pat Poker[edit]

Lucky Luke contre Pat Poker
(Lucky Luke versus Pat Poker)
Cover of the Belgian edition
Date1953
SeriesLucky Luke
PublisherDupuis
Creative team
WritersMorris
ArtistsMorris
Original publication
Published inSpirou magazine
Date of publication1953
LanguageFrench
ISBN978-2800114453

Lucky Luke contre Pat Poker is a Lucky Luke comic by Morris, it was the fifth album in the series and was printed by Dupuis in 1953 and by Cinebook in English in 2013 as Lucky Luke versus Pat Poker. The album contains two stories of Pat Poker - Nettoyage à Red City ("Cleanup in Red City") and Tumulte à Tumbleweed ("Tumult in Tumbleweed").

Stories[edit]

Nettoyage à Red City[edit]

Named Sheriff of Red City, Lucky Luke is not at his best when he arrives in the city. Shortly before, he had his clothes and Jolly Jumper stolen while going for a swim in a river. He must ride in the accustomed stagecoach dressed in the clothes of a 10-year-old child. Red City is a lawless city dominated by Pat Poker, a professional card player (cheater) who leads a gang of outlaws. They receive Luke like a kid, offer him a sheriff's badge, a toy gun and a small wooden horse. Luke is a bit distraught but he quickly picks up. Thanks to a skunk, it helps a citizen not to be hanged by the men of Pat Poker. Then he finds his horse and realizes that it has been stolen by Pat Poker. He plays for it in cards and, against all odds, wins it. Poker advises him to leave before sunset otherwise his skin will not be worth anything. Luke does but he returns at night, hidden in a cart of hay. He first captures two men from Pat Poker as they rob the vault of the breeder’s bank. Then he tackles Pat Poker himself in his own saloon. Poker manages to escape thanks to another accomplice, the undertaker of the city, but Luke manages quite easily to catch him.

Tumulte à Tumbleweed[edit]

Lucky Luke arrives at Tumbleweed after a rough ride. He enters the local saloon and is well received there until the arrival of Angelface, a tough guy who hates foreigners, shepherds and sheep. He threatens Lucky Luke if he does not leave the place. Angelface is distracted by the arrival of a dog in the village. At Tumbleweed, the arrival of a dog heralds the arrival of a shepherd. The mobster follows the dog which leads him to the shepherd who makes his flock of sheep cross the valley. Angry, Angelface tries to hang the shepherd but he is prevented by Lucky Luke who temporarily puts him out of harm's way. The shepherd is quick to leave with his sheep.

Meanwhile, Pat Poker, recently released from prison, arrives at Tumbleweed after crossing the desert. He succeeds playing cards, plucking the owner of the saloon and becomes the new master of the place. When he sees Lucky Luke, he gets scared and tries to trap him. The confrontation does not end to his advantage but Lucky Luke does not have an arrest warrant against him and lets him go. Angelface, who has seen it all, decides to ally himself with Pat Poker. The latter pays him to kill his enemy. A first try in a hotel room ends in failure. Pat Poker then invites Lucky Luke to a game of cards. Angelface will have to shoot him by shooting him in the back of the window of his hotel room. Again, Lucky Luke survives because he suspected something and he took advantage of a moment of inattention from Angelface to sabotage his rifle.

Later, a sheriff arrives at Tumbleweed to catch Pat Poker. At the saloon, he is beaten up by Angelface who seriously injures him, throwing him outside. Lucky Luke searches him and finds an arrest warrant for Pat Poker. He takes the place of the sheriff offside and enters the saloon where he whips Angelface. Pat Poker flees but Luke manages to catch and capture him.

Hors-la-loi[edit]

Hors-la-loi
(Outlaws)
Cover of the Belgian edition
Date1954
SeriesLucky Luke
PublisherDupuis
Creative team
WritersMorris
ArtistsMorris
Original publication
Published inSpirou magazine
Date of publication1954
LanguageFrench

Hors-la-loi is a Lucky Luke comic by Morris, it was the sixth album in the series and was printed by Dupuis in 1954 and by Cinebook in English in 2014 as Outlaws. The story pits Lucky Luke against a fictionalized version of the Dalton brothers.[1]

Synopsis[edit]

The story begins with a quick presentation of the four Dalton brothers: Bob, Great, Bill and Emmet Dalton. Their first bank attack in 1889 in El Reno, Oklahoma, marked the start of their criminal careers, followed by a stagecoach attack. The Daltons' growing reputation worries the government, sending Lucky Luke to stop them. This ensures the transport of money of a train. Luke later meets the bandits in a saloon where he gives them a show of force. The Dalton escape under the noses of the villagers. Once released, the Dalton continue their misdeeds and their reputation forces them to remain on their guard. They find Lucky Luke in a saloon and flee. They then try to have cosmetic surgery without success. Believing Lucky Luke removed for good, they decide to attack Coffeyville, on October 5, 1892, at 9 o'clock. There, Lucky Luke finds them and ambushes them in front of the bank, an ambush which will be fatal for them since they will be imprisoned then hanged.

Notes[edit]

It is the first Lucky Luke story that was based (loosely) on real historical events from the Old West.[2]

L'Élixir du Dr Doxey[edit]

L'Élixir du Dr Doxey
(Dr Doxey's Elixir)
Cover of the German edition
Date1955
SeriesLucky Luke
PublisherDupuis
Creative team
WritersMorris
ArtistsMorris
Original publication
Published inSpirou magazine
Date of publication1955
LanguageFrench

L'Élixir du Dr Doxey is a Lucky Luke adventure in French, written and illustrated by Morris. It is the seventh title in the original series and was published by Dupuis in 1955, and by Cinebook in English in 2012 as Doc Doxey's Elixir. The album contains two stories of Doc Doxey - Lucky Luke et le Docteur Doxey ("Lucky Luke and Doctor Doxey") and Chasse à l'homme ("Manhunt"). The story is about quackery.

Stories[edit]

Lucky Luke et le Docteur Doxey[edit]

Doctor Doxey is an unscrupulous charlatan ready to do anything to sell his worthless elixir. With the help of his henchman, Scraggy, he tries to persuade people in the many cities where he stops that his medicine cures everything. Scraggy disguises himself as a helpless old man or a disabled old woman, swallows the elixir then starts to frolic and jump like a young man of 20 years. Gullible people buy the elixir. Doxey does not hesitate to poison the water of a village to make its inhabitants sick, so that he can cure them with his elixir. Another time, he kidnaps a sheriff who wanted to stop him from doing his "job". The first time Doxey and Scraggy meet Lucky Luke, they steal Jolly Jumper from him. Luke, who sees a dishonest man in Doxey, decides to trap him. He publishes an article in a newspaper saying that the sheriff had $5,000 with him when he disappeared. Doxey and Scraggy go to the cabin where they put him to take the money from him. But Lucky Luke follows them and catches them in the act.

Chasse à l'homme[edit]

Doctor Doxey escapes from prison, and Lucky Luke sets off in pursuit. After a rough crossing of the desert during which he loses his horse, Doxey arrives at Coyoteville. After quenching his thirst (with a whole keg of beer), he shaves his beard to go unnoticed. In fact, Lucky Luke does not recognize him when he arrives in Coyoteville. Doxey begins again quietly to make his quack trade under the name of Doctor Oxide in front of Luke, who continues not to recognize him. However, when a child draws a false beard on the portrait of his poster, Luke immediately makes the link. He goes to arrest Doxey, but Doxey manages to escape thanks to an explosive. Momentarily rid of Luke, Doxey tries to sell his elixir to the inhabitants of La Siesta but circumstances and the sheriff prevent him. It is in the neighboring village that Luke manages to catch him and neutralize him.

Phil Defer[edit]

Lucky Luke contre Phil Defer
(Lucky Luke versus Phil Wire)
Cover of the German edition
Date1956
SeriesLucky Luke
PublisherDupuis
Creative team
WritersMorris
ArtistsMorris
Original publication
Published inLe Moustique magazine
Date of publication1954
LanguageFrench

Phil Defer is a Lucky Luke adventure in French, written and illustrated by Morris. It was the eighth title in the original series and was published by Dupuis in 1956 and in English by Cinebook in 2013 as Phil Wire. The album contains two stories - Lucky Luke contre Phil Defer "the Faucheux" ("Lucky Luke versus Phil Wire 'The Spider'") and Lucky Luke et Pilule ("Lucky Luke and Pill").

Stories[edit]

Lucky Luke contre Phil Defer[edit]

In the town of Bottleneck Gulch, the only saloon for miles around is the "Ace of Spades". It belongs to a crook, O'Sullivan, who sells adulterated whiskey. But as it is the only bar in the area, "Ace of Spades" does good business thanks to thirsty cowboys passing by. But one day, a certain O'Hara opens his own "Ace of Hearts" saloon. Failing to take over his rival and being on the verge of bankruptcy, O'Sullivan decides to hire a professional hitman, Phil Wire, to rid him of O'Hara, dead or alive. Lucky Luke, who is a friend of O'Hara, decides to impersonate Phil Wire. With O'Hara, they put on a production to make believe the death of Phil Wire. As O'Sullivan prepares to leave, the real Phil Wire arrives in town. Together, they try by all means to get rid of Luke and O'Hara. But Lucky Luke is watching. Finally, Phil Wire provokes Lucky Luke into a final duel. Lucky Luke wins the duel and shoots Phil Defer on the shoulder which will end his career as a hitman. Because of this injury, Phil can no longer use a weapon. Afterwards, O'Sullivan is chased away. O'Hara takes his rival's saloon and unites it with his to form the "2 Aces Saloon" (spades and hearts), with "the longest bar in the west".

Lucky Luke et Pilule[edit]

Lucky Luke tells other cowboys the story of a little man nicknamed Pill (because he regularly consumes pills) and who looked like a weed from big cities and who had, at first sight, nothing of a hero of the West. He arrives in a city infested by criminals and revolver fights, "Smokey Town". After having contributed (involuntarily) to the arrest of a bandit, Pill is named Sheriff. Thereafter, Pill must arrest the whole gang of criminals. Luckily, his clumsiness and myopia (having lost his glasses at that time) which made him deviate from the target he was aiming at, help Pill to kill all the criminals. The gang leader almost killed him, but the bullet was stopped by the pill box the Sheriff was carrying.

Des rails sur la Prairie[edit]

Des rails sur la Prairie
(Rails on the Prairie)
Cover of the Belgian edition
Date1957
SeriesLucky Luke
PublisherDupuis
Creative team
WritersGoscinny
Morris
ArtistsMorris
Original publication
Date of publication1957
LanguageFrench

Des rails sur la Prairie is a Lucky Luke comic written by Goscinny and Morris. It is the ninth album in the series and the first on which Goscinny worked. It is also the first in which Lucky Luke, moving away towards the setting sun at the last box, sings his song "I'm a poor lonesome cowboy ..." The comic was printed by Dupuis in 1957 and in English by Cinebook in 2011 as Rails on the Prairie.

Synopsis[edit]

Lucky Luke must protect the construction of the railway to the West against the threats of a crooked shareholder of the stagecoaches who sees in the arrival of the train the end of his business.

Alerte aux Pieds Bleus[edit]

Alerte aux Pieds-Bleus
(The Bluefeet are coming!)
Date1958
SeriesLucky Luke
PublisherDupuis
Creative team
WritersMorris
ArtistsMorris
Original publication
Published inSpirou magazine
Date of publication1958
LanguageFrench

Alerte aux Pieds Bleus is a Lucky Luke adventure in French, written and illustrated by Morris it was the tenth title in the original series and was published by Dupuis in 1958 and by Cinebook in English as The Bluefeet are coming!. It is unique in the sense that it was the only story published solo by Morris after starting a collaboration with René Goscinny.

Plot summary[edit]

Convinced that they will find firewater among the palefaces, blue-foot (like the Blackfoot) Indians besiege the town ... Lucky Luke will see all the colors! [3]

In Rattlesnake Valley, Arizona, Pedro Cucaracha is causing a stir by defrauding the locals in poker. Lucky Luke, who had stopped there by chance, catches him playing against the city's peacekeeper, Sheriff Jerry Grindstone. Thanks to his dexterity with regard to persuasion by arms, the cowboy has no trouble scaring the cheater of Mexican origin who runs away quickly. To take revenge, he appeals to the Bluefeet, an Indian tribe of the valley, for compensation in kind (alcohol). The latter besiege the city, which they eventually lose, trying to attack as the cavalry arrives to settle the situation.

Ruée sur l'Oklahoma[edit]

Ruée sur l'Oklahoma
(The Oklahoma Land Rush)
Cover of the French edition
Date1960
SeriesLucky Luke
PublisherDupuis
Creative team
WritersGoscinny
Morris
ArtistsMorris
Original publication
Date of publication1960
LanguageFrench
Chronology
Preceded byLe Juge (1959)
Followed byL'Évasion des Dalton (1960)

Ruée sur l'Oklahoma is a Lucky Luke comic written by Morris. It is the fourteenth album in the Lucky Luke series. The comic was printed by Dupuis in 1960 and by Cinebook in 2009 as The Oklahoma Land Rush. The story is based on the historical Land Run of 1889.

Synopsis[edit]

By 1830, the American government had given Oklahoma to the Indians where they were bored. Several years later, they bought the land back for some glass beads to promote colonization. It was decided that on April 22, 1889, the territory would be open to colonization and, to be sure that there will be no one installed before the rush, Lucky Luke is responsible for monitoring the operation. The adventure begins by emptying the territory of the inhabitants who had ventured there without legal authorization, then watching the candidates with the rush with the border. Some, including Beastly Blubber, do not hesitate to try to cross the border but they are easily detected by Lucky Luke. Coyote Will, who has a simple-minded accomplice called Dopey, is also trying to cross the border, but he is quickly overtaken by Luke.

The day before the rush, everyone seems ready. Some have doped their horse to leave faster, others have sabotaged the carriage of a possible competitor.

The next day at noon, the signal is given and it's the rush. The settlers enter Oklahoma and take over the land in a rather anarchic way. A city is created, Boomville, where houses are built at full speed. The speculation is going well and some do business in gold. It is in this context that Coyote Will, Beastly Blubber and Dopey arrive. After taking over the saloon, they sell alcohol despite the ban and form a secret gambling den. Lucky Luke stops them.

Then elections for the town hall are organized and three quarters of the population are candidates. The three bandits are released to vote and Dopey decides to also campaign. To the surprise of all and first of all his accomplices, he is elected mayor. And, to the great satisfaction of all and thanks to the help of Lucky Luke, he makes a good mayor. But misery sets in because of drought. Coyote Will organizes a demonstration against the mayor but a sandstorm ruins everything. People leave Oklahoma; it's the end of Boomville. Dopey chases his two former accomplices, declaring that he now leads an honest life. Finally, Oklahoma is returned to the Indians for the same glass beads they had accepted at the beginning.

L'Évasion des Dalton[edit]

L'Évasion des Dalton
(The Daltons' Escape)
Cover of the French edition
Date1960
SeriesLucky Luke
PublisherDupuis
Creative team
WritersGoscinny
Morris
ArtistsMorris
Original publication
Date of publication1960
LanguageFrench
Chronology
Preceded byRuée sur l'Oklahoma (1960)
Followed byEn remontant le Mississippi (1961)

L'Évasion des Dalton is a Lucky Luke comic written by Goscinny and Morris. It is the fifteenth album in the series. The comic was printed by Dupuis in 1960 and Cinebook in English in 2011 as The Daltons' Escape.

Synopsis[edit]

The Daltons manage to escape the penitentiary. Lucky Luke is set on their trail. The four brothers, eager to avenge Lucky Luke, place fake search notices and publish fake newspaper articles to make Luke a criminal.

Fortunately for Lucky Luke, people are, for the most part, far too afraid to dare to attack him. Finally, Luke finds the Daltons and is captured. They force the cowboy to serve as a stooge by doing a lot of chores.

Finally, Lucky Luke manages to escape with the help of the cavalry and assault the Daltons. Joe and Luke duel, with Joe putting oil in his holster hoping to draw faster. But his own trick turns against him and Lucky Luke succeeds in bringing back the four brothers to the penitentiary... while waiting for the next escape.

En remontant le Mississippi[edit]

En remontant le Mississippi
(Travelling up the Mississippi)
Cover of the French edition
Date1961
SeriesLucky Luke
PublisherDupuis
Creative team
WritersGoscinny
Morris
ArtistsMorris
Original publication
Date of publication1961
LanguageFrench
Chronology
Preceded byL'Évasion des Dalton, 1960
Followed bySur la piste des Dalton, 1962

En remontant le Mississippi is a Lucky Luke comic written by Goscinny and Morris. It is the sixteenth title in the Lucky Luke Series. The comic was printed by Dupuis in 1961 and by Cinebook in English in 2021 as Steaming Up the Mississippi. Both Goscinny and Morris were avid readers of frontier tales and particularly Mark Twain books. This album is culturally significant as it is connected with Mark Twain's experience as a Mississippi steamboat pilot before the American Civil War.

The plot and many details like safety-last style of sailing, card sharks aboard, tampering with safety valves, unloading passengers to speed up the ship, etc. are borrowed from the famous (or infamous) 1870 race between paddle steamers Robert E. Lee under the command of Captain John Cannon and Natchez IV, under Captain Thomas Leathers.

Plot[edit]

Competition is fierce among steamboats captains plying the Mississippi river. Sleazy and devious Captain Lowriver, master of paddle steamer Abestos D. Plover is trying to establish a monopoly on the New Orleans-Minneapolis line and wants his arch rival Captain Barrows, master of the Daisy Belle out of the way. Both captains finally devise a race from New Orleans to Minneapolis to settle the matter: whoever wins the race remains sole operator of steamboats on the Mississippi. Confident in his ship and crew capabilities but fearing foul play from his opponent part Captain Barrows hires Lucky Luke as a supervisor and bodyguard.

And foul play there is: Lowriver hires a professional gambler who almost manages to win Barrows' ship in a rigged-up poker game, an attempt foiled at the last minute by the wiser Lucky Luke.

The voyage goes on, with the floods, droughts and snag tree-trunks constantly impairing both ship's progress up Mississippi. Lucky Luke is a helpful hand on board as a pilot, constantly gauging the river depth and avoiding the Daisy Belle being stranded after the ship has lost the main river bed during a flood. His task aboard is loosely modelled on Mark Twain's job on Mississippi steamboats, which inspired his famous pen-name.

Lowriver keeps trying to cheat his opponent out of the race: he hires a gunman (who however skilled is no match for Lucky Luke) and later a big bald-headed bully brute called Ironhead Wilson whose bullet-proof cranium is a deadly weapon. Ironhead Wilson methodically batters the ship's boiler to pieces with his head and allows Lowriver's ship (aboard which passengers have been disembarked at gunpoint to lighten the craft) take the lead during the final stage to Minneapolis.

Unable to get rid of him with bullets, Lucky Luke punches his opponent's ribcage with his fists, which Ironhead Wilson feels like a mere tickling and bursts in an uncontrollable laughter that makes him jump overboard, only to be attacked by alligators.

While Wilson mashes the alligators to a pitiful condition and escapes unscathed, Barrows and his crew patch up the boiler and start gaining fast on the rival ship as the finish line in Minneapolis is in sight. Aboard both ships, engineers and stokers try to raise more steam pressure and pelt more wood into the boilers, only to have the safety valves opening.

Infuriated and half crazy Lowriver then sits atop the valve counterweight, allowing his ship to regain the lead, while Barrows, concerned with his passengers' and crews' safety, admits defeat. In a final twist, the boiler of Lowriver's ship explodes in a spectacular fashion, destroying everything and sending Lowriver and his crew in the water where hungry and smiling alligators are awaiting them.

A rather dejected and alligator-bitten Lowriver is fished out by Lucky Luke and admits his defeat, but a magnanimous Barrows tells him that "There is plenty of space for everybody on this old river" and proceeds to the Minneapolis greeting ceremony, while Lucky Luke slips out and makes his trademark exit into the sunset, singing his favorite song.

Sur la piste des Dalton[edit]

Sur la piste des Dalton
(On the Daltons' Trail)
Cover of the French edition
Date1962
SeriesLucky Luke
PublisherDupuis
Creative team
WritersGoscinny
Morris
ArtistsMorris
Original publication
Date of publication1962
LanguageFrench
Chronology
Preceded byEn remontant le Mississippi (1961)
Followed byÀ l'ombre des derricks (1962)

Sur la piste des Dalton is a Lucky Luke comic written by Goscinny and Morris. It is the seventeenth title in the Lucky Luke series. The comic was printed by Dupuis in 1962 and by Cinebook in English in 2009 as On the Daltons' Trail.

Synopsis[edit]

The Daltons escape. They are followed by Rintincan. After refusing to take charge of them again, Lucky Luke is forced to do so after they steal horses and a cow from a friend's house. Aided by Rintincan, he manages to catch up with them. In an unfortunate combination of circumstances and because of Rintincan, Luke is taken prisoner by the Daltons, who use it as a bargaining chip against the release of Joe Dalton, who had previously been arrested at Rightful Bend. Averell Dalton, who is fond of the dog, goes looking for it, which will be the cause of his capture as well as those of his brothers.

Les Rivaux de Painful Gulch[edit]

Les Rivaux de Painful Gulch
(The Rivals of Painful Gulch)
Cover of the English edition
Date1962
SeriesLucky Luke
PublisherDupuis
Creative team
WritersGoscinny
Morris
ArtistsMorris
Original publication
LanguageFrench
Chronology
Preceded byÀ l'ombre des derricks (1962)
Followed byBilly the Kid (1962)

Les Rivaux de Painful Gulch is a Lucky Luke adventure written by Goscinny and illustrated by Morris. It is the nineteenth book in the series and it was originally published in French in 1962 . English editions of this French series have been published by Dargaud and Cinebook Ltd as The Rivals of Painful Gulch.

In this adventure Lucky Luke tries to sort out a bitter feud between two warring families: the big-eared O'Haras and the big-nosed O'Timmins, whose rivalry causes endless mayhem in the town of Painful Gulch and has ruined the local economy. The inspiration was the Hatfield-McCoy feud.

Synopsis[edit]

In the town of Painful Gulch, the families O'Timmins (big red nose) and O'Hara (big ears) have been fighting for decades, and do not even know why. Lucky Luke is named mayor of the city to try to solve this problem.

Lucky Luke tries to reconcile the two families through a big party with competitions where everything is programmed so that only O'Timmins and O'Hara win. But this party ends in a fist fight. Lucky Luke finally decides to put the men of both families in prison until they decide to make peace. The women of the two families who are tired of this war speed up the rapprochement when they force the two to work together to put out a fire on the O'Hara ranch. Painful Gulch finally knows peace and the two families become great friends.

Les Dalton dans le blizzard[edit]

Les Dalton dans le blizzard
(The Daltons in the Blizzard)
Cover of the French edition
Date1963
SeriesLucky Luke
PublisherDupuis
Creative team
WritersGoscinny
Morris
ArtistsMorris
Original publication
Date of publication1963
LanguageFrench
Chronology
Preceded byLes Collines noires (1963)
Followed byLes Dalton courent toujours (1964)

Les Dalton dans le blizzard is a Lucky Luke adventure written by Goscinny and illustrated by Morris. It is the twenty-second book in the series and it was originally published in French in 1963 and in English by Cinebook in 2009 as The Daltons in the Blizzard.

Synopsis[edit]

Once more, the Daltons escape. This time, Joe has an idea to avoid Lucky Luke. They will cross the border and settle in Canada. To be sure that Luke will not follow their lead, they pretend to be the Jones brothers: Frank, Louis, Robert and Jim Jones (the latter, for a simplistic reason, will turn into Imbecile Jones). The trouble is that everyone recognizes the Daltons and Lucky Luke has no trouble following their lead, especially since a witness told him they were going to Canada. The Daltons manage to cross the border. They arrive in the middle of winter: it is cold and there is snow on the ground.

On the day of their arrival, they attack a local saloon and learn that there is only one policeman in the area, Corporal Winston Pendergast. The latter, who lives with a certain Grospierre, has just met Lucky Luke who, in turn, has just crossed the Canadian border. Both men learn about the inn's attack, which makes Daltons criminals in Canada. They decide to join forces to stop them. They get themselves on their track, which is easy because it is punctuated by attacks from banks. In a town, Lucky Luke manages to arrest William, Jack and Averell who are released soon after by Joe. The Daltons decide to flee to the north.

They arrive in Golden Glow where the night lasts six months. Joe's first goal is to buy the saloon where prospectors come to spend their gold. For this, they organize a boxing bout arranged between Joe and Averell. Jack and William will bet for Joe and he will win. Averell, however, does not agree and knocks out Joe during the fight. When William succeeds in making him listen to reason and Joe wins, the spectators ransack the saloon. The owner decides to leave the country, disgusted, and the property eventually becomes property of the Daltons. That's when Lucky Luke and Corporal Pendergast arrive in town. After having successfully mounted the local population against them, the Daltons flee. Surrounded by wolves in the forest, they surrender to Lucky Luke, who returns them to the U.S..

Les Dalton courent toujours[edit]

Les Dalton courent toujours
(The Daltons always on the run)
Cover of the French edition
Date1964
SeriesLucky Luke
PublisherDupuis
Creative team
WritersGoscinny
Morris
ArtistsMorris
Original publication
Date of publication1964
LanguageFrench
Chronology
Preceded byLes Dalton dans le blizzard (1963)
Followed byLa Caravane (1964)

Les Dalton courent toujours is a Lucky Luke adventure written by Goscinny and illustrated by Morris. It is the 23rd book in the series and it was originally published in French in 1964 and by Cinebook in English in 2012 as The Daltons Always On The Run.

Synopsis[edit]

The new President of the United States decrees a general amnesty. All prisoners are released, including the Daltons. They settle in a nearby town, Awful Gulch, and rent a space next to the bank, so they can tunnel to this establishment and steal the money. But Lucky Luke quickly moves the bank and installs the sheriff's office there instead.

Joe Dalton then changes his mind and attacks the stagecoach after Averell knocks out Lucky Luke. They then spend a little time in Pocopoco Pueblo and then, after their crimes have been known in this city, try to cross the desert. This is where Lucky Luke catches them and brings them back to the penitentiary.

La Caravane[edit]

La Caravane
(The Wagon Train)
Cover of the English edition
Date1964
SeriesLucky Luke
PublisherDupuis
Creative team
WritersGoscinny
Morris
ArtistsMorris
Original publication
LanguageFrench
Chronology
Preceded byLes Dalton courent toujours, (1964)
Followed byLa Ville fantôme (1965)

La Caravane is a Lucky Luke adventure written by Goscinny and illustrated by Morris. It was originally published in French by Dupuis in 1964. English editions of this French series titled The Wagon Train have been published by Dargaud and Cinebook. The story was loosely adapted into the film Go West: A Lucky Luke Adventure.

Synopsis[edit]

A caravan arrives at Nothing Gulch. The guide, Frank Malone, does not want to drive it further if he is not given $1000 more. He is prevented from shooting by Lucky Luke who was just stopping at Nothing Gulch. Andrew Boston, the leader of the caravan, manages to persuade him to take the place of Malone and become captain of the caravan.

While waiting for the departure, Luke meets the most eminent members of the caravan: Miss Littletown, Mr. Pierre, Ugly Barrow, Zachary Martins and others. Then it is the departure. From then on, weird events begin to happen. The day after departure, the wheel of a wagon is sawn off. The next day, the harness of Andrew Boston's horses is cut. The pioneers face the facts: there is a traitor in the caravan. When they arrive in the desert, all the water barrels of the carriages are pierced. Thanks to the tenacity of Lucky Luke, the caravan manages to cross anyway.

After a stop in Crazy Town (a city of vice and gambling that the women of the caravan burn before their men lose everything to cards), the expedition enters the territory of the Sioux. As soon as it arrives, the convoy of weapons explodes mysteriously. There are almost no more weapons to counter a possible Indian attack. The next night, a fire is lit in the camp while Lucky Luke had expressly forbidden it. The next day, Luke and Ugly Barrow catch a Sioux, Head of Calf, but he does not want to talk. The next night, the mysterious saboteur frees him after knocking out Andrew Boston. The Indian immediately reports to his boss, Enraged Dog. The Sioux soon besiege the caravan and, after enjoying a hearty meal, the Sioux follow with a good sleep, the people of the caravan take the opportunity to besiege in turn the Indians. Enraged Dog decides to parley and promises to stop the war if Mr. Pierre, the French hairdresser, will hand over his 'scalps' - wigs.

On the eve of arriving in California, an impotent old woman disappears from the caravan. Lucky Luke guesses that this is Frank Malone disguised and that he is the saboteur of the expedition. He goes to meet him and the duel is won by Luke. In California, on the Pacific Rim, the pioneers celebrate the end of their journey.

La Ville fantôme[edit]

La Ville fantôme
(Ghost Town)
Cover of the English edition
SeriesLucky Luke
PublisherDargaud
Creative team
WritersGoscinny
Morris
ArtistsMorris
Original publication
Published inSpirou magazine
Date of publication1965
LanguageFrench
Chronology
Preceded byLa Caravane (1964)
Followed byLes Dalton se rachètent (1965)

La Ville fantôme is a Lucky Luke comic written by Goscinny and illustrated by Morris. The original French-language version was printed in 1965 by Dupuis. English editions of this comic have been published by Dargaud, and Cinebook in 2006, under the title Ghost Town.

Plot[edit]

While trekking through a mountain, Lucky Luke encounters two men, Denver Miles and Colorado Bill, who accompany him in his journey. They eventually come across Gold Hill, a town that has been abandoned for years. Its only resident is Powell, an old, bitter and delusional miner, who threatens them with a shotgun. It is later revealed that in his young days, Powell was tricked into buying a gold mine that was salted by its previous owner. When the rumors spread that there was gold in the mountain, people rushed there and built the town of Gold Hill. But when no gold was found the people left as soon as they came. Powell refused to accept the fact and still believes that there is gold in his obviously worthless mine. Luke, Miles and Bill leave for another town, Bingo Creek.

Miles and Bill are revealed to be con artists, who plan on buying Powell's mine, salt it and sell it back for a high price. Luke meanwhile begins to feel sympathy for Powell and decides to help him in his hard times. The con men are thwarted at every turn, but eventually Powell realizes the futility of his pursuit and agrees to sell the mine to them in a few days when the relevant authorities arrive in Bingo Creek. Miles and Bill proceed to salt the mine, however Bill gets hasty and has an article published in newspapers about the value of the mine causing another gold rush to begin. Powell is similarly excited and returns to his mine. However, as expected, no one finds anything and people believe that Powell is hiding all the gold for himself. Luke eventually forces Miles and Bill to confess the truth of their actions and they are tar-and-feathered and run out of town. The people prepare to leave Gold Hill once more, but Luke presents a passionate speech about true value of the land being more than the riches it could hold. Powell agrees with Luke and convinces many of the people to stay and help Gold Hill return to its former glory, albeit without the focus of gold mining.

Shortly before Luke leaves to continue his travels, Powell reveals that he has actually discovered a real vein of gold in his mine. Luke points out that should this information be revealed to the public, Gold Hill would return to its old ways and would most probably never revive this time. Powell eventually agrees and blows up his mine with dynamite, ensuring that no one will ever know the truth and allowing Gold Hill to prosper as a normal town.

Les Dalton se rachètent[edit]

Les Dalton se rachètent
(The Daltons redeem themselves)
Cover of the French edition
Date1965
SeriesLucky Luke
PublisherDupuis
Creative team
WritersGoscinny
Morris
ArtistsMorris
Original publication
Date of publication1965
LanguageFrench
Chronology
Preceded byLa Ville fantôme (1965)
Followed byLe Vingtième de cavalerie (1965)

Les Dalton se rachètent is a Lucky Luke adventure written by Goscinny and illustrated by Morris. It is the 26th book in the series and it was originally published in French in 1965 and in English by Cinebook in 2012 as The Daltons Redeem Themselves.

Synopsis[edit]

Following the enactment of a new law, the Daltons are paroled. If they commit a single offense within 30 days of release, they are immediately returned to prison. The Daltons then settle in the town of Tortilla Gulch to start their new life. Lucky Luke is responsible for checking that the Daltons remain really quiet during this probationary period.

Le Vingtième de cavalerie[edit]

Le Vingtième de cavalerie
(The Twentieth Cavalry)
Cover of the French edition
Date1965
SeriesLucky Luke
PublisherDupuis
Creative team
WritersGoscinny
Morris
ArtistsMorris
Original publication
Date of publication1965
LanguageFrench
Chronology
Preceded byLes Dalton se rachètent (1965)
Followed byL'Escorte (1966)

Le Vingtième de cavalerie is a Lucky Luke adventure written by Goscinny and illustrated by Morris. It is the twenty-seventh book in the series and it was originally published in French in 1965 and English in 2010 as The Twentieth Cavalry. The character of Colonel McStraggle is a nod on actor Randolph Scott.

Plot[edit]

Buffaloes having been illegally hunted on their territory, which the Cheyenne need for their survival, the Cheyenne break the treaty authorizing the free movement of whites on it. Worse than that is that someone has even provided the Indians with firearms! Lucky Luke is sent to find a solution to the crisis and do everything to get a new pact signed between Yellow Dog and McStraggle, colonel of the 20th Cavalry Regiment.

Lucky Luke volunteers as scout for the 20th Cavalry and, visiting Yellow Dog, quickly finds out that Derek Flood, a renegade cavalrist, is hatching a plot against McStraggle for having kicked him out of the army. The situation for the beleaguered soldiers becomes more desperate as Flood exploits his insider knowledge of the fort to starve out his ex-comrades. Lucky Luke and Grover escape the siege to fetch reinforcements to rescue their comrades. The reinforcements arrive just as McStraggle leads a potentially suicidal charge out the fort, forcing the Indians to surrender. Flood is arrested.

L'Escorte[edit]

L'Escort
(The Escort)
Cover of the French edition
Date1966
SeriesLucky Luke
PublisherDupuis
Creative team
WritersGoscinny
Morris
ArtistsMorris
Original publication
Date of publication1966
LanguageFrench
Chronology
Preceded byLe Vingtième de cavalerie (1965)
Followed byDes barbelés sur la prairie, (1967)

L'Escorte is a Lucky Luke adventure written by Goscinny and illustrated by Morris. It is the twenty eighth book in the series and It was originally published in French in 1966. It was published in English in 2009 by Cinebook under the title The Escort.

Plot[edit]

Four years after the great clash between Lucky Luke and Billy the Kid resulting in a 1,247 year prison sentence for Billy, Luke is asked to escort Billy to New Mexico to face trial for the crimes he committed there. However, Billy's enduring reputation and his repeated attempts at escape - mostly with the inept assistance of felon Bert Malloy - offer Luke and Jolly Jumper their fair share of excitement on the way.[4][5]

Des barbelés sur la prairie[edit]

Des barbelés sur la prairie
(Barbed Wire on the Prairie)
Cover of the English edition
SeriesLucky Luke
PublisherDargaud
Creative team
WritersGoscinny
Morris
ArtistsMorris
Original publication
Published inSpirou magazine
Date of publication1967
LanguageFrench
Chronology
Preceded byL'Escorte (1966)
Followed byCalamity Jane (1967)

Des barbelés sur la prairie is a Lucky Luke comic written by Goscinny and illustrated by Morris. It was originally published in French by Dupuis in 1967. English editions titled Barbed wire on the Prairie were published by Cinebook Ltd in 2007.

Plot[edit]

Lucky Luke involves himself in a quarrel between peaceful farmers and unscrupulous (and fattened-up) ranchers led by Cass Casey who indiscriminately drive their cattle right across the farmers' crops in search of new pastures. The only way the farmers can see to stop this continual rampage is to use the titular material to fence off and protect their land: barbed wire. With the assistance of Lucky Luke, both sides eventually come to realize that without greens there can be no meat, and the matter is settled in the usual happy-end manner.

Tortillas pour les Daltons[edit]

Tortillas pour les Daltons
(Tortillas for the Daltons)
Cover of the English edition
Date1967
SeriesLucky Luke
PublisherDupuis
Creative team
WritersGoscinny
Morris
ArtistsMorris
Original publication
LanguageFrench
Chronology
Preceded byCalamity Jane (1967)
Followed byLa Diligence (1967)

Tortillas pour les Daltons is a Lucky Luke adventure written by Goscinny and illustrated by Morris, published by Dupuis in 1967. It was translated into English as Tortillas for the Daltons, published by Cinebook in 2008.

Plot[edit]

While being moved from their regular prison to a newer prison, situated near the Rio Grande, the wagon containing the Dalton gang is hijacked by the infamous Mexican bandit Emílio Espuelas and his men. The two gangs team up to kidnap the local mayor, disguising the Daltons as mariachi musicians.

Meanwhile, the Mexican ambassador to The United States of America has threatened with decreased diplomatic relations and, ultimately, war, unless the Daltons are returned to the US. Lucky Luke departs to Mexico by direct order of the president.

Ultimately the grand scheme is foiled by Lucky Luke switching places with the mayor and Averell revealing the Daltons plan of double-crossing the Mexicans while drunk on tequila.

Back across the border Luke is awarded a medal and Averell flaunts his new expression: "¿Cuando se come aqui?".

La Diligence[edit]

La Diligence
(The Stagecoach)
Cover of the French edition
Date1968
SeriesLucky Luke
PublisherDargaud
Creative team
WritersGoscinny
Morris
ArtistsMorris
Original publication
Date of publication1968
LanguageFrench
Chronology
Preceded byTortillas pour les Dalton (1967)
Followed byLe Pied-tendre (1968)

La Diligence is a Lucky Luke adventure written by Goscinny and illustrated by Morris. It is the 32nd book in the series and was originally published in French in 1968, and in English by Cinebook in 2010 as The Stagecoach.

Synopsis[edit]

Due to an increasing rate of stagecoach holdups, Wells Fargo & Co. decides to organize and conduct a special trip with a load of gold from Denver to San Francisco, with Lucky Luke participating as an escort, to reboost the company's failing public image. Also, the company decides to demonstrate the safety of its transport by ensuring the transport of a cargo of gold between Denver and San Francisco. A large advertising campaign is organized around the event. Some passengers join the trip: a photographer, a professional player, a priest, a couple and a gold digger.

As expected, the stagecoach becomes the target for various hold-up attempts, in addition to an Indian attack, an encounter with the bandit poet Black Bart, various on-board gambling sessions, a traitor - Reverend Rawlins - among the passengers, and (as prescribed by the company) a continuous diet of potatoes and lard (bacon and beans in some earlier translations). In the end the gold not only arrives safely in San Francisco, but the passengers have also gained some new personal insights from that trip.

Cultural references[edit]

  • The story was inspired by John Ford's 1939 film, Stagecoach. The poker player in the story, Scat Thumbs, was modelled after actor John Carradine who appeared in the film.
  • The character of Hank Bully, the coach driver, is a caricature of actor Wallace Beery. This character resurfaces in volume 54, La Fiancée de Lucky Luke.
  • Film director Alfred Hitchcock has a small cameo as a saloon bartender.

Le Pied-tendre[edit]

Le Pied-tendre
(The Tenderfoot)
Cover of the English edition
SeriesLucky Luke
PublisherDargaud
Creative team
WritersGoscinny
Morris
ArtistsMorris
Original publication
Published inSpirou magazine
Date of publication1968
LanguageFrench
Translation
PublisherGeïllustreerde Pers
Date1970
Chronology
Preceded byLa Diligence (1968)
Followed byDalton City, (1969)

Le Pied-tendre is a Lucky Luke comic written by Goscinny and illustrated by Morris. The original comic in French was published by Dargaud in 1968. English translations titled The Tenderfoot have been published by Dargaud and Cinebook Ltd.

Plot[edit]

When Baddy, the owner of a naturally-rich piece of land, dies, his heir, Waldo Badminton, a tenderfoot, leaves from England to take possession of his ranch. This newcomer is not to the liking of Jack Ready, who was waiting to buy Baddy's ranch, a good reason to try to bully the newcomer! This one, contrary to expectations, makes his way in the Far West, aided by Lucky Luke, his butler Jasper and Sam, an Indian who served Baddy after he saved him from a massacre. Jack Ready then fakes his death and has Waldo accused. The ruse is quickly discovered by Lucky Luke, giving the opportunity to hold a pistol duel in European style. Defeated, Ready and his sidekick leave town. Another tenderfoot then arrives from England, who Waldo dislikes, and gives the same tenderfoot treatment as he was given.

Dalton City[edit]

Dalton City
Cover of the English edition
SeriesLucky Luke
PublisherDargaud
Creative team
WritersGoscinny
Morris
ArtistsMorris
Original publication
Published inPilote magazine
Date of publication1969; 55 years ago (1969)
LanguageFrench
Chronology
Preceded byLe Pied-tendre, (1968)
Followed byJesse James, (1969)

Dalton City is a Lucky Luke comic written by Goscinny and illustrated by Morris. The original Belgian/French comic was published by Dargaud in 1969. English editions of this Belgian/French series have been published by Dargaud, and by Cinebook in 2006.

Plot[edit]

Lucky Luke closes down the corrupt settlement of Fenton Town, Texas and arrests the owner, Dean Fenton. Fenton brags about his town to the Daltons while in prison. A mix-up with the newly installed telegraph results in Joe Dalton being released for 'good behavior'. He breaks out the others and they decide to fix up Fenton Town, renaming it Dalton City. They capture Lucky Luke, who agrees to help them with the town. They hire some dancing girls and Lucky Luke plants the idea of staging a wedding to lure people. The wedding is between Joe and Lulu Breechloader, the singer. The guests arrive, but when the wedding is announced, it turns out that Lulu was unaware and is already married to the pianist, Wallace. Initially the guests shoot at Lucky Luke, but turn on Joe. The Cavalry arrives to round the criminals up, having been tipped off by Wild Trout, an Indian who won at roulette, having bet a vase, and expecting 36 other vases. After everyone has left, Belle, one of the dancing girls, manages to jump out of the (abnormally hard) cake.

Dalton City eventually becomes Angel Junction, a town of 243,000 people.

Jesse James[edit]

Jesse James
Cover of the English edition
SeriesLucky Luke
PublisherDargaud
Creative team
WritersGoscinny
Morris
ArtistsMorris
Original publication
Published inPilote magazine
Date of publication1969
LanguageFrench
Chronology
Preceded byDalton City (1969)
Followed byWestern Circus (1970)

Jesse James is a Lucky Luke comic written by Goscinny and illustrated by Morris. The original French edition was printed in 1969 by Dargaud. English editions of this French series have been published by Dargaud, Cinebook. Brockhampton Press and Tara Press. It is based on the true story of Jesse James (1847–1882).

Plot[edit]

In 1880, the story begins with Jesse James, who idolizes and tries to emulate Robin Hood, but somehow he is not able to clearly define the line between the rich he is supposed to rob and the poor he is supposed to help. With the help of his Shakespeare aficionado brother Frank, he therefore simply redefines the term "poor" for his own benefit, and along with Cole Younger the two begin robbing trains en masse, forcing Lucky Luke to move out and stop them with the somewhat inept assistance of two Pinkerton detectives.

Western Circus[edit]

Lucky Luke #36
Western Circus
Cover of the English edition
SeriesLucky Luke
PublisherDargaud
Creative team
WritersGoscinny
Morris
ArtistsMorris
Original publication
Published inPilote
Date of publication1970
LanguageFrench
Chronology
Preceded byJesse James (1969)
Followed byCanyon Apache (1971)

Western Circus is a Lucky Luke comic written by Goscinny and illustrated by Morris. It was originally published in French by Dargaud in the year 1970. English editions of this French series have been published by Dargaud.

Synopsis[edit]

Circus performers left New York City due to an enmity with real-life circus entrepreneur P.T. Barnum; but gambling drunkard (yet lovable) manager Captain Mulligan lost more and more of the circus in their tour, until they coincidentially meet Lucky Luke.

Zilch, rich organizer of a great annual rodeo, sees in the arrival of the Western Circus a harmful competition. He hires Rattlesnake Joe, a hit man, to put an end to it. In the end, the villainous Zilch and the kind director of the circus become partners and make a successful tour of Europe.

Canyon Apache[edit]

Canyon Apache
(Apache Canyon)
Cover of the French-language version
SeriesLucky Luke
PublisherDargaud
Creative team
WritersGoscinny
Morris
ArtistsMorris
Original publication
Published inPilote
LanguageFrench
Chronology
Preceded byWestern Circus, (1970)
Followed byMa Dalton, (1971)

Canyon Apache is a Lucky Luke comic written by Goscinny and Morris. It was first published by Dargaud in French in the year 1971. English editions have been published by Knight Books, in 1977, and Cinebook in 2009, under the title Apache Canyon.

Synopsis[edit]

Lucky Luke is responsible for bringing peace between Colonel O'Nolan's cavalry and Patronimo's Apache tribe. There has been war ever since the Apaches kidnapped his son. Being considered a traitor to the cavalry, he joins the Apaches to prevent war that way, taking on the name of 'Lucky Luko'. However, he is soon considered a traitor to the Apaches too. When Colonel O'Nolan is captured, they find out, just before they are to be executed, that the medicine man, who is to be killing them, is O'Nolan's son, and Patronimo is not a real Apache - his father, Bisteco, the previous chief who disappeared years ago, is Lazlo Bystek, who lives in New York.

Ma Dalton[edit]

Ma Dalton
Cover of the English edition
SeriesLucky Luke
PublisherDargaud
Creative team
WritersGoscinny
Morris
ArtistsMorris
Original publication
Published inPilote magazine
Date of publication1971
LanguageFrench
Chronology
Preceded byCanyon Apache (1972)
Followed byChasseur de primes (1971)

Ma Dalton is a Lucky Luke comic written by Goscinny and illustrated by Morris. It was first published in French in the year 1971 by Dargaud. English editions of this French series have been published by Cinebooks and Tara Press. Ma Dalton was inspired by real-life Ma Barker.[citation needed]

Plot[edit]

Mrs. Dalton, the mother of the Dalton Brothers, spends a relatively quiet life in retirement until she invites her four sons for a visit. At first, Joe uses Ma's reputation among the fellow citizens to commit robberies — and later, Mum, for the love of her sons (Averell in particular), decides to return to family business once more, presenting Lucky Luke with an additional headache: How to deal with a reckless old lady shootist?

Chasseur de primes[edit]

Chasseur de primes
(The Bounty Hunter)
Cover of the French-language version
Date1972
SeriesLucky Luke
PublisherDargaud
Creative team
WritersGoscinny
Morris
ArtistsMorris
Original publication
Published inPilote
Date of publication1972
LanguageFrench
Chronology
Preceded byMa Dalton (1971)
Followed byLe Grand Duc (1973)

Chasseur de primes is a Lucky Luke adventure written by Goscinny and illustrated by Morris. It is the thirty-ninth book in the series and it was originally published in French in 1972 and in English by Cinebook in 2010 as The Bounty Hunter.

Plot[edit]

Following a short introduction on the general status of bounty hunters in the Old West, we get introduced to the titular character, Elliot Belt, a notorious and unscrupulous representative of his trade.

Lucky Luke decides to find His Highness, a prime stallion belonging to wealthy horse rancher Bronco Fortworth to avoid the risk of an injustice. But Fortworth, convinced that the Cheyenne Wet Blanket (a former farmhand of his) is the thief, launches a wanted notice and a reward of 100,000 dollars to who will bring the Indian. Belt is interested in the offer ande repeatedly offers Lucky Luke to join, but the lone cowboy declines his offer.

While Luke seeks to find Wet Blanket first, fearing that this hunt could lead to an Indian war, Elliot Belt is obsessed with the reward he could receive. He brings together several other bounty hunters to attack the Cheyenne village and find Wet Blanket. This incident nearly causes an Indian war and gets Luke captured by the Cheyenne, but Wet Blanket, proclaiming his innocence, frees Luke, interrupts the war before it can begin, and willingly agrees to stand trial. A protest by Fortworth and the bounty hunters is deflected by Luke, and when Belt kidnaps the Indian to collect the bounty, Wet Blanket simply walks away when the other bounty hunters ambush Belt, and is collected by Luke.

On the way back to the town of Cheyenne Pass, where the trial is to be held, Luke and Wet Blanket discover His Highness in the wild, and bring him along to the courthouse. Another dramatic change takes place when Thelma, Fortworth's estranged wife, comes to testify at the trial and admits that it was she who released the stallion, jealous of the affection that Fortworth had for the animal. The Fortworth couple, who had separated, reconciles. Wet Blanket is exonerated, and Fortworth gives the reward to the Cheyennes.

As Luke leaves the court, Belt attempts to kill him for revenge, but his plan fails. Upon seizing him, Luke learns that Belt is wanted for "trying to cause an Indian war". Instead of delivering him to the sheriff, Luke persuades the latter to release Belt; but in turn, the federal warrant is still posted, leaving Belt to be chased by bounty hunters himself. The story ends with the Cheyenne using Fortworth's money to open an amusement park.

Notes[edit]

  • Elliot Belt's appearance is an obvious nod on Lee Van Cleef, particularly his acting roles as merciless bounty hunter.
  • The scene where Elliot as a child denounces himself to his father (for a reward) for having chopped down a cherry tree is inspired by the myth concerning George Washington.
  • In one scene, the story makes a humorous pass at the Lone Ranger character Tonto.

Le Grand Duc[edit]

Le Grand Duc
(The Grand Duke)
Cover of the French edition
Date1973
SeriesLucky Luke
PublisherDargaud
Creative team
WritersGoscinny
Morris
ArtistsMorris
Original publication
Published inPilote
Date of publication1973
LanguageFrench
Chronology
Preceded byChasseur de primes (1972)
Followed byL'Héritage de Rantanplan (1973)

Le Grand Duc is a Lucky Luke adventure written by Goscinny and illustrated by Morris. It is the fortieth book in the series and it was originally published in French in the year 1973 and by Cinebook in 2011 under the title of The Grand Duke. The story is loosely based on the Grand Duke Alexei Alexandrovich of Russia, who undertook a tour of America in 1870–1871. This fictional character is most likely inspired by the real Grand Duke Alexis Alexandrovich of Russia, son of Emperor Alexander II and ambassador to the United States, whose trip to America from 1871 to 1872 left a picturesque memory, especially when he distinguished himself during a buffalo hunt with the famous Buffalo Bill.

Plot[edit]

The Russian Grand Duke Leonid pays a diplomatic visit to the United States. However, a great reader of James Fenimore Cooper, in order for an important treaty to be completed, he first wants to have a recreational trip through the West, complete with bandits and Indian attacks! Lucky Luke is assigned as a bodyguard to the duke, who is quickly targeted by all sorts of villainous persons — first and foremost a Russian anarchist who tries his best (or his worst) to assassinate the Grand Duke. With the interpreter of the Grand Duke, they travel the country, chased by the mysterious terrorist trying to assassinate the diplomat. Their journey begins in Abilene, the city where cowboys meet.

L'Héritage de Rantanplan[edit]

L'Héritage de Rantanplan
(The Inheritance of Rantanplan)
Cover of the French edition
Date1973
SeriesLucky Luke
PublisherDargaud
Creative team
WritersGoscinny
Morris
ArtistsMorris
Original publication
Published inPilote
Date of publication1973
LanguageFrench
Chronology
Preceded byLe Grand Duc (1973)
Followed by7 histoires complètes (1974)

L'Héritage de Rantanplan is a Lucky Luke adventure written by Goscinny and illustrated by Morris. It is the forty first book in the series and was originally published in French in the year 1973 and in English by Cinebook in 2020 as Rin Tin Can's Inheritance. Mark Twain appears in two panels on page 13.

Synopsis[edit]

A former prisoner of the penitentiary where Rantanplan is located, the late Oggie Svenson, bequeaths his vast fortune in real estate to the latter, who leaves prison to live in his hotel under the protection of Lucky Luke in Virginia City. But the will states that if the dog dies, everything would go to Joe Dalton. Learning of this, the Daltons escape and attempt to kill Rantanplan.

Le Cavalier blanc[edit]

Le Cavalier blanc
(The Dashing White Cowboy)
Cover of the French edition
SeriesLucky Luke
PublisherDargaud
Creative team
WritersGoscinny
Morris
ArtistsMorris
Original publication
Published in1975
LanguageFrench
Chronology
Preceded by7 histoires complètes - série 1 (1974)
Followed byLa Guérison des Dalton (1975)

Le Cavalier blanc is a Lucky Luke comic written by Goscinny and Morris. English translations of this French comic titled The Dashing White Cowboy have been published by Dargaud and Cinebook.

Plot[edit]

Lucky encounters a wandering theater troupe, whose specialty play is the titular drama, The Dashing White Cowboy. But in each town where they perform, a major robbery takes place right during the climactic end scene. His suspicions aroused, Lucky Luke decides to keep a sharp eye on the group, but in the course of his investigation nearly ends up being framed as the culprit twice. Only with the help of a repentant member of the troupe, Gladys, can he bring the culprits to justice.

La Guérison des Dalton[edit]

La Guérison des Dalton
(A Cure for the Daltons)
Cover of the French edition
Date1975
SeriesLucky Luke
PublisherDargaud
Creative team
WritersGoscinny
Morris
ArtistsMorris
Original publication
Date of publication1975
LanguageFrench
Chronology
Preceded byLe Cavalier blanc (1974)
Followed byL'Empereur Smith (1976)

La Guérison des Dalton is a Lucky Luke adventure written by Goscinny and illustrated by Morris. It is the forty fourth book in the series and It was originally published in French in the year 1975 and in English by Cinebook in 2010 as A Cure for the Daltons.

Synopsis[edit]

Professor Otto Von Himbeergeist, a famed psychologist, announces that crime is a psychologically based personal inefficiency which can be cured by therapy, and he chooses the Dalton Brothers as his test subjects. The doctor takes the Daltons to a farm to be in a better environment for treatment. Lucky Luke has to watch them. Nevertheless, the Daltons escapes with the professor who rallies to them. They then resort to a special method for their robberies: Otto psychoanalyses the director of the bank who gives them the money themselves. But the treatment really worked on Averell who does not want to commit crimes anymore. Using this feature against the Daltons, Luke manages to capture the entire gang and take them to jail.

Cultural references[edit]

  • The psychologist is a caricature of German film actor Emil Jannings.
  • Near the end of the story it is hinted that the psychologist's ideas will have an influence on a little boy born in Austria around the same time. This is of course a nod to Sigmund Freud, whom the nurse even directly references when she says: "Mrs. Freud! Mrs. Freud! Just hear what little Sigi wanted to do with me!"

Le Fil qui chante[edit]

Le Fil qui chante
(The Singing Wire)
Cover of the French edition
Date1977
SeriesLucky Luke
PublisherDargaud
Creative team
WritersGoscinny
Morris
ArtistsMorris
Original publication
Date of publication1977
LanguageFrench
Chronology
Preceded byL'Empereur Smith (1976)
Followed byLa Ballade des Dalton (1978)

Le Fil qui chante is a Lucky Luke adventure written by Goscinny and illustrated by Morris. It is the forty sixth book in the series and was originally published in French in 1977 by Dargaud and in English by Cinebook in 2012. The story is based on the historical feat of constructing the First Transcontinental Telegraph line connecting the West Coast of the United States and the East Coast of the United States in 1861. The title in English is The Singing Wire, referring both to "singing" of wires (caused by vortex shedding), and the transmission of communication (later voice) across electric cables.

This album was adapted from the animated series Lucky Luke, released for the first time in 1984.

Synopsis[edit]

One hundred thousand dollars will be offered to the city which will build the telegraph line to Salt Lake City the quickest. Carson City in the west and Omaha in the east are up to the challenge. But the sabotage of the opposing team and the attacks of Indians will somewhat slow down the pioneers of the singing wire, of which Lucky Luke is a part, having resigned from the Pony Express to join the team.

Historical figures include:

Sarah Bernhardt[edit]

Sarah Bernhardt
Date1981
SeriesLucky Luke
PublisherDargaud
Creative team
WritersXavier Fauche and Jean Léturgie
Morris
ArtistsMorris
Original publication
Date of publication1982
LanguageFrench
Chronology
Preceded byLe Bandit manchot (1981)
Followed byLa Corde du pendu (1981)

Sarah Bernhardt is a Lucky Luke adventure written by Xavier Fauche and Jean Léturgie and illustrated by Morris.[6] It was the first Lucky Luke story by these script writers after René Goscinny's death. It was originally published in French in the year 1982 and by Cinebook in English in 2017. The plot features real-life actress Sarah Bernhardt.[7][8]

The story was also adapted as an episode of the animated series Lucky Luke, but instead of Bernhardt it used a fictional singer and actress.

Plot[edit]

In 1880 French actress Sarah Bernhardt plans a visit to the United States. U.S. President Rutherford Hayes asks Lucky Luke to protect her during her tour against the league for virtue and especially against the wife of the US president.

Historical background[edit]

Bernhardt indeed visited the United States in 1880.[9] The story that certain preachers warned people against her debauchery is also authentic, as is the plot element were Bernhardt posed on top of a dead whale in Boston to have her picture taken.[9][10][11] In the story Bernhardt quotes the first lines from the poem Le Vase Brisé (The Broken Vase) by Sully Prudhomme.

La Corde du pendu[edit]

La Corde du pendu et autres histoires
(The Rope of the Hanged)
Cover of the French edition
Date1982
SeriesLucky Luke
PublisherDargaud
Creative team
WritersGoscinny
Morris
ArtistsMorris
Original publication
Date of publication1982
LanguageFrench
Chronology
Preceded bySarah Benhardt (1982)
Followed byDaisy Town (1983)

La Corde du pendu et autres histoires (lit.: The Hangman's Rope and Other Stories) is a Lucky Luke adventure written by Goscinny with Morris and illustrated by Morris. It was originally published in French in the year 1982. The album contains seven short stories.

The name recalls La Corde du Pendu (1870), the last and incomplete novel featuring Rocambole.

Stories[edit]

La Corde du pendu ("The Hangman's Rope")[edit]

In a small town, a rope seller named Ropey regularly instigates the local mob into hanging every culprit for even the smallest of offenses - a practice Lucky Luke decides to put to an end to.

Les Dalton prennent le train ("The Daltons Take the Train")[edit]

The Daltons escape again and decide to rob trains, only to be hindered by more bandit competition and, in the end, Lucky Luke.

Le Justicier ("The Justiciary")[edit]

Lucky Luke arrives at Coyote Gulch and meets Zozzo, a clumsy vigilante who is not able to bring justice. After failing to train him, Luke then disguises himself as Zozzo and walks around the town to scare passing troublemakers, which helps Zozzo gain a reputation as a great hero.

La Mine du chameau ("The Camel Mine")[edit]

Lucky Luke meets Hadji Ali, a Muslim who tries to prove the worth of his camels and becomes a legend in Arizona after having come across a gold mine but willingly relinquishing it to the locals. This story is inspired by a real, failed attempt by the American army to use camels for convoys crossing the American deserts.

Règlement de comptes ("Gunfight")[edit]

Lucky Luke re-encounters saloon dancer Laura Legs (from Le Grand Duc). This makes the son of a rich rancher, who has a crush on Laura, jealous and compels him to duel the cowboy. However, he eventually finds his true match with the blacksmith's daughter, who is genuinely in love with him.

La Bonne parole ("The Good Word")[edit]

Absestos Misbeliever, a dedicated but stubborn preacher, travels to the territory of the Apaches to bring them the word of God to them. With his incautious approach, Lucky Luke finds himself compelled to act as the preacher's escort.

Li-Chi's Story[edit]

This story describes the rise of Li-Chi, a Chinese acquaintance of Lucky Luke's, from becoming sheriff in a Chinese immigrant town to an unsuccessful candidate for US presidency.

Daisy Town[edit]

Daisy Town
Cover of the French edition
Date1983
SeriesLucky Luke
PublisherDargaud
Creative team
WritersGoscinny
Morris
ArtistsMorris
Original publication
Date of publication1983
LanguageFrench
Chronology
Preceded byLa Corde du pendu (1981)
Followed byFingers (1983)

Daisy Town is a Lucky Luke adventure written by Goscinny with Morris and illustrated by Morris. It was originally published in French in the year 1983 and in English, by Cinebook in 2016. The comic is an adaptation of the 1971 film Daisy Town.

In one panel at the beginning of the album, an error appears in the drawing. Lucky Luke's revolver is no longer in his belt, but he also does not have it in hand.

Panel 23B nods to the album Ghost Town through the teacher from Daisy Town who stops in the middle of a triangle to watch the showdown between Lucky and the Daltons. The Gold Hill school in Plate 17A of Ghost Town presents the same design after it was also abandoned for the same reasons. The title of the lesson "The triangle" is however inscribed there.

Summary[edit]

A young town in the Far West, Daisy Town, attracts many criminals who spread fear and chaos in its streets. Barely arrived in town, and preceded by his reputation, Lucky Luke agrees to take on the role of sheriff in order to combat the crime. Shortly after having fulfilled this task with flying colors, the Dalton brothers arrive and decide to make this city their own, and for that they would resort to numerous ploys essentially aimed at terrorizing the population. They are however systematically defeated by Luke, who ends up driving them out of the city, covered in tar and feathers. It is then that the Daltons are captured by the Indians. Seizing the opportunity, Joe Dalton then tries to inspire the Indian chief's hatred of Daisy Town, so that he digs up the hatchet. The Indians therefore decide to go into battle against the city, while keeping the Daltons prisoners. Lucky Luke decides to take matters into his own hands to defend Daisy Town, and the intervention of the cavalry (just in time) makes it possible to stop the fight and make the Indians flee. The story ends with the discovery of gold in the mountains; gold towards which all the inhabitants rush, making Daisy Town a ghost town.

Sources[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Pasamonik, Didier (26 July 2013). "Comment les Dalton ont failli disparaître !". Le Point (in French). Retrieved 20 January 2023.
  2. ^ Renault, Jean-Michel (2006). Censure et caricatures: les images interdites et de combat de l'histoire de la presse en France et dans le monde. Pat à Pan. ISBN 9782952405034.
  3. ^ The original from Amazon.fr: Alerte aux pieds-bleus : Persuadés qu'ils trouveront de l'eau de feu chez les visages pâles, les Peaux-rouges aux pieds-bleus assiègent la ville... Lucky Luke va en voir de toutes les couleurs ! [1]
  4. ^ Goscinny, René; Goscinny; Morris (2009). The Escort. Cinebook. ISBN 978-1-905460-98-4.
  5. ^ Achdé; Pennac, Daniel; Benacquista, Tonino (2013). Lone Riders. Cinebook. ISBN 978-1-84918-168-6.
  6. ^ "Détail de l'album : Sarah Bernhardt" (in French). Bang Bang Lucky Luke. 1982.
  7. ^ "Lucky Luke 50. Sarah Bernhardt" (in French). BD Cest'. 1982.
  8. ^ "Morris". Lambiek Comiclopedia. n.d.
  9. ^ a b McArthur, Benjamin (1984). Actors and American Culture, 1880-1920. p. 130.
  10. ^ "Sarah Bernhardt and the Whale". Mataura Ensign. 1887-02-11. Retrieved 2022-08-10.
  11. ^ Silverthorne, Elizabeth (2003). Sarah Bernhardt. Infobase. p. 42. ISBN 9781438124162.

External links[edit]