Chatham Arch, Indianapolis

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Chatham-Arch Historic District
Arch and Broadway in Indianapolis.jpg
Houses on the north side of the 600 block of E. Arch St
Chatham Arch, Indianapolis is located in Indianapolis
Chatham Arch, Indianapolis
Chatham Arch, Indianapolis is located in Indianapolis
Chatham Arch, Indianapolis
Chatham Arch, Indianapolis is located in Indiana
Chatham Arch, Indianapolis
Chatham Arch, Indianapolis is located in the US
Chatham Arch, Indianapolis
Location Roughly bounded by I-65, College Ave., 10th, 11th, North, New Jersey, Cleveland and East Sts., Indianapolis, Indiana
Coordinates 39°46′42″N 86°8′48″W / 39.77833°N 86.14667°W / 39.77833; -86.14667Coordinates: 39°46′42″N 86°8′48″W / 39.77833°N 86.14667°W / 39.77833; -86.14667
Area 54.5 acres (22.1 ha)
Built 1836
Architectural style Italianate, Queen Anne, Gothic Revival
NRHP Reference # 80000057[1]
Added to NRHP March 13, 1980

Chatham Arch is a neighborhood located immediately east of Downtown Indianapolis, Indiana, United States. This neighborhood is one of the oldest in Indianapolis, dating back to the mid 19th century. Chatham Arch contains many of Indianapolis's historic homes.

The Chatham-Arch Historic District is a 54.5-acre (22.1 ha) national historic district in the neighborhood that was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1980.[1] In 1980 it included 112 contributing buildings that were deemed to contribute to the historic character of the area. It developed between about 1836 and 1930, and includes representative examples of Italianate, Gothic Revival, and Queen Anne style architecture. Notable buildings include the Allen Methodist Episcopal Church (1927), Christian Hornberger House (1886), Mary Jefferson House (1875-1880), Rev. William Armstrong House (1881), Joseph Wernsing House (1868), Sarah Dye House (1890), Thomas Fiscus House (1865-1866), The Richelieu (1905), August Buschmann Building (1894), St. Joseph's Catholic Church (1879), Park Avenue Church (1909), First United Brethren Church (1922), Chatham Place (1878), The Argyle (1911), Wallace Block (1880), and Knauf-Smith Block (1886).[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b National Park Service (2009-03-13). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 
  2. ^ "Indiana State Historic Architectural and Archaeological Research Database (SHAARD)" (Searchable database). Department of Natural Resources, Division of Historic Preservation and Archaeology. Retrieved 2016-08-01.  Note: This includes Judith Burd (August 1979). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory Nomination Form: Chatham-Arch Historic District" (PDF). Retrieved 2016-08-01.  and Accompanying photographs

External links[edit]