Chatton

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Chatton
Chatton is located in Northumberland
Chatton
Chatton
Chatton shown within Northumberland
Population338 (2011 census)[1]
OS grid referenceNU054281
Unitary authority
Ceremonial county
Region
CountryEngland
Sovereign stateUnited Kingdom
Post townALNWICK
Postcode districtNE66
Dialling code01668
PoliceNorthumbria
FireNorthumberland
AmbulanceNorth East
EU ParliamentNorth East England
UK Parliament
List of places
UK
England
Northumberland
55°32′49″N 1°54′50″W / 55.547°N 1.914°W / 55.547; -1.914Coordinates: 55°32′49″N 1°54′50″W / 55.547°N 1.914°W / 55.547; -1.914

Chatton is a village in Northumberland, in England. It is roughly 6 km (3.7 mi) to the east of Wooler.

History[edit]

Chatton has been occupied for many centuries. There has been a church on the site since the twelfth century.[2] There is evidence of occupation in prehistoric times: a rock overhang at nearby Ketley Crag has examples of pre-historic rock art petroglyphs, including a profusion of cup and ring marks, which have been described as "stunning".[3]

Writing in 2003, local historian Joy Palmer-Cooper described Chatton as an "'estate' village", mainly from the nineteenth century. Palmer-Cooper identified five Grade II listed buildings in Chatton: "Chatton Park House ..., Chatton Bridge, the former Chatton United Reformed Church, the Blacksmith's Shop, and Broomhouse Farmhouse."[4] In 2013, Grade II listed building status was also awarded to the Parish Church.[5]

Nearby, though not within the main village itself, there are former tower houses such as Fowberry Tower and Hetton Hall, Grade II* listed fifteenth century tower houses later incorporated in country houses.[6][7] (Both these houses are privately owned, and not open to the general public.)

Economy[edit]

The village has amenities which include a pub (the Percy Arms) and village shop.

Religious sites[edit]

The present-day Holy Cross Church on Church Hill Road is a Grade II listed building. It replaced an earlier thirteenth century building, and was constructed between 1763 and 1770 with later extensions.[5] The church - which belongs to the Church of England - holds regular services and is part of the southern benefice of Glendale.[8]

From 1850 to 1980, the Presbyterian Church of Chatton (from 1972, a United Reformed Church) stood on New Road. In 1979, serious structural damage was found and the building closed, with the congregation conducting services in Holy Cross Church's building. The old Presbyterian Church building passed into private ownership; since 1995, it has housed the Chatton Gallery.[9]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Parish population 2011". Retrieved 3 July 2015.
  2. ^ "Northumberland Communities - Chatton". Northumberland County Council. Retrieved 3 June 2018.
  3. ^ "Ketley Crag Rock Shelter" at rockart.ncl.ac.uk Archived April 15, 2012, at the Wayback Machine
  4. ^ Palmer-Cooper, Joy A., ed. (2003). Chatton: A Portrait; A Celebration of Life Past and Present in a North Northumberland Village (1st ed.). ABE. p. 131. ISBN 0-9546474-0-8.
  5. ^ a b "Holy Cross Church, Chatton - 1415535" (list entry from the National Heritage List for England). Historic England. Retrieved 3 June 2018.
  6. ^ "Fowberry Tower - 1370883" (list entry summary from the National Heritage List for England). Historic England. Retrieved 6 June 2018.
  7. ^ "Hetton Hall, Chatton - 1277031" (list entry summary from the National Heritage List for England). Historic England. Retrieved 3 June 2018.
  8. ^ "Holy Cross - Chatton" (church website). Self-published. Retrieved 3 June 2018.
  9. ^ Palmer-Cooper, Joy A., ed. (2003). Chatton: A Portrait; A Celebration of Life Past and Present in a North Northumberland Village (1st ed.). ABE. pp. 175–177. ISBN 0-9546474-0-8.

Further reading[edit]

  • Palmer-Cooper, Joy A., ed. (2003). Chatton: A Portrait; A Celebration of Life Past and Present in a North Northumberland Village (1st ed.). ABE. ISBN 0-9546474-0-8.

External links[edit]