Chelidonic acid

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Chelidonic acid
Chelidonic acid Structural Formula V.1.svg
Names
Systematic IUPAC name
4-Oxo-4H-pyran-2,6-dicarboxylic acid
Other names
Jerva acid; Jervaic acid; Jervasic acid; γ-Pyrone-2,6-dicarboxylic acid
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.002.499
Properties
C7H4O6
Molar mass 184.10 g·mol−1
Melting point 257 °C (495 °F; 530 K)[1] (decomposes)
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
Infobox references

Chelidonic acid is a heterocyclic organic acid with a pyran skeleton.

Preparation[edit]

Chelidonic acid can be prepared in two steps from diethyl oxalate and acetone:[1][2]

SynthChelidon.png

Uses[edit]

Chelidonic acid is used to synthesize 4-Pyrone via thermal decarboxylation.[3]

Natural occurrence[edit]

Chelidonic acid was first discovered in extracts of Chelidonium majus.[4][5][6] It occurs naturally in plants of the Asparagales order.[7] Potassium chelidonate has been found to be responsible for nyctinasty in some plants; specifically, it has been found to regulate the closing of leaves of Cassia mimosoides at nightfall.[8]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b E. Raymond Riegel and F. Zwilgmeyer (1937). "Chelidonic acid". Org. Synth. 17: 40. ; Coll. Vol., 2, p. 126 
  2. ^ G. Horvath; C. Russa; Z. Koentoes; J. Gerencser (1999). "A new Efficient Method for the Preparation of 2,6-Pyridinedihiethyl Ditosylates from Dimethyl 2,60-Pyridinedicarboxylates". Synth. Comm. 29 (21): 3719–3732. doi:10.1080/00397919908086011. 
  3. ^ Weygand, Conrad (1972). Hilgetag, G.; Martini, A., eds. Weygand/Hilgetag Preparative Organic Chemistry (4th ed.). New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. p. 1009. ISBN 0471937495. 
  4. ^ Roscoe, H.E.; Schorlemmer, C. (1890). A Treatise on Chemistry, Volume 3, Part 2 (1st ed.). New York: D Appleton and Company. p. 624. 
  5. ^ Probst, Joseph M. A. (1839) "Beschreibung und Darstellungsweise einiger bei der Analyse des Chelidonium majus aufgefundenen Stoffe" (Description and methods of preparation of some substances found during the analysis of Chelidonium majus), Annalen der Chemie und Pharmacie, 29 (2) : 113–131 ; see especially pp. 116–118.
  6. ^ See also: Lerch, Joseph Udo (1846) "Untersuchung der Chelidonsäure" (Investigation of chelidonic acid), Annalen der Chemie und Pharmacie, 57 : 273–318.
  7. ^ Angiosperm Phylogeny Website. Angiosperm Phylogeny Group http://www.mobot.org/MOBOT/research/APweb/orders/asparagalesweb.htm#Asparagales. Retrieved 30 August 2017.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  8. ^ See:
    • Ueda, Minoru ; Ohnuki, Takashi ; Yamamura, Shosuke (1998) "Leaf-opening substance of a nyctinastic plant, Cassia mimosoides," Phytochemistry, 49 (3) : 633–635. Abstract available at: Science Direct
    • Ueda, Minoru ; Yamamura, Shosuke (July 1998) "Chemical studies on plant movement," Current Organic Chemistry, 2 (4) : 437–461.