Cheng Tin Hung

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鄭天熊
Cheng Tin Hung
Born 1930 (1930)
Hong Kong, China
Died 7 May 2005 (aged 74–75)
Nationality Chinese
Style Founder of Wudang taijiquan
Notable students Cheng Kam Yan (鄭鑑恩)
Cheng Tin Hung
Chinese

Cheng Tin Hung or Zheng Tianxiong (1930–2005) was an influential taijiquan master and the founder of "Wudang taijiquan". He was based in Hong Kong, China, and sometimes attracted controversy for his attitude and approach to the teaching and practice of his martial art. Also known as the "Tai Chi Bodyguard" for his enthusiastic defence of Taijiquan as a martial art, he took part in full contact competitions as a young man and also trained some of his students to do the same during the 1960s, '70s and '80s.

Though closely associated with the Wu school of taijiquan, he founded a separate organisation called the Hong Kong Tai Chi Association (香港太極總會) which is now run by his wife Chan Lai Ping(陳麗平).

Cheng Tin Hung produced a series of books and VCDs on the subject of Taijiquan and was also involved in the production of the 1974 Hong Kong movie called The Shadow Boxer (Shaw Brothers). He appears in the opening scenes and some of his techniques were also used within the fight scenes of the movie proper.

During the 1980s, Cheng Tin Hung travelled to the UK to promote Taijiquan with one of his students Dan Docherty, and also produced a joint publication with him called Wutan Tai Chi Chuan.

During the 1990s Cheng Tin Hung's taijiquan career slowly drew to a close with the onset of diabetes and its debilitating effects; he finally passed from this world in 2005.

Some career highlights of note[edit]

  • 1950: Established the Cheng Tin Hung Tai Chi Academy in Hong Kong
  • 1957: Won the Hong Kong Macau Taiwan boxing competition held in Taiwan
  • 1972: Established the Hong Kong Tai Chi Association
  • 1975: In conjunction with the Hong Kong government, established Taijiquan classes throughout Hong Kong
  • 1980s: started construction of Tai Chi Heights, part retirement home and part Taijiquan resource centre in his hometown in Guangdong, China.

T'ai chi ch'uan lineage tree with Wu-style focus[edit]

Note:

  • This lineage tree is not comprehensive, but depicts those considered the 'gate-keepers' & most recognised individuals in each generation of Wu-style.
  • Although many styles were passed down to respective descendants of the same family, the lineage focused on is that of the Wu style & not necessarily that of the family.


Key: NEIJIA
Solid lines Direct teacher-student.
Dot lines Partial influence
/taught informally
/limited time.
TAIJIQUAN
Dash lines Individual(s) omitted.
Dash cross Branch continues. CHEN-STYLE Zhaobao-style
YANG-STYLE
(王蘭亭)
Wang Lanting
1840–?
2nd gen. Yang
(杨健侯)
Yang Jianhou
1839–1917
2nd gen. Yang
2nd gen. Yangjia Michuan
(杨班侯)
Yang Banhou
1837–1892
2nd gen. Yang
2nd gen.
Guang Ping Yang
Yang Small Frame
WU (HAO)-STYLE Zhaobao He-style
Li-style (杨少侯)
Yang Shaohou
1862–1930
3rd gen. Yang
Yang Small Frame
(吴全佑)
Wu Quanyou
1834–1902
1st gen. Wu
(齊閣臣)
Qi Gechen
2nd gen. Wu
(夏公甫)
Xia Gongfu
2nd gen. Wu
(吴鉴泉)
Wu Jianquan
1870–1942
2nd gen. Wu
WU-STYLE
108 Form
(常遠亭)
Chang Yuanting
1860–1918
2nd gen. Wu
(郭松亭)
Guo Songting
2nd gen. Wu
(王茂齋)
Wang Maozhai
1862–1940
2nd gen. Wu
SUN-STYLE
(董英杰)
Dong Yingjie
1891–1960
4th gen. Yang
(齊敏軒)
Qi Minxuan
3rd gen. Wu
(鄭榮光)
Cheng Wing Kwong
1903–1967
3rd gen. Wu
(吴英华)
Wu Yinghua
1907–1997
3rd gen. Wu
(吴公儀)
Wu Gongyi
1900–1970
3rd gen. Wu
(吴公藻)
Wu Gongzao
1903–1983
3rd gen. Wu
(马岳梁)
Ma Yueliang
1901–1998
3rd gen. Wu
(杨禹廷)
Yang Yuting
1887–1982
3rd gen. Wu
(鄭天熊)
Zheng Tianxiong
1930–2005
Wudang-style
(吴大揆)
Wu Dakui
1923–1972
4th gen. Wu
(吴雁霞)
Wu Yanxia
1930–2001
4th gen. Wu
(吴大新)
Wu Daxin
1933–2005
4th gen. Wu
Li Liqun
1924–2013
4th gen. Wu
(王培生)
Wang Peisheng
1919–2004
4th gen. Wu
(吴光宇)
Wu Guangyu
1946–Present
5th gen. Wu
(骆舒焕)
Luo Shuhuan
1935–1987
5th gen. Wu
CHEN-STYLE YANG-STYLE WU-STYLE SUN-STYLE WU (HAO)-STYLE

Notes[edit]

References[edit]