Chennupati Jagadish

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Chennupati Jagadish
AC
Born India
Nationality Australian
Alma mater
Occupation Physicist; academic
Known for Nanotechnology; Optoelectronics; Semiconductors
Spouse(s) Vidya Jagadish

Chennupati Jagadish AC, an Indian-Australian physicist and academic, is a Distinguished Professor of Physics at the Australian National University Research School of Physics and Engineering. He is head of the Semiconductor Optoelectronics and Nanotechnology Group which he established in 1990. He is the Convener of the Australian Nanotechnology Network and Director of Australian National Fabrication Facility ACT Node.[1]

Education[edit]

Jagadish obtained his BSc degree in Physics from Acharya Nagarjuna University (VSR College, Tenali) in 1977, MSc(Tech) Applied Physics (Electronics) degree from Andhra University in 1980 and MPhil and PhD degrees in Physics (Semiconducting thin films) from University of Delhi in 1982 and 1986, respectively.[citation needed]

Career[edit]

After completing his PhD in Physics at the University of Delhi, Jagadish worked at Sri Venkateswara College, New Delhi as a Lecturer in Physics and Electronics during 1985–1988. He was a post-doctoral fellow at Queen's University Physics Department during 1988–1990. He moved to the Australian National University in 1990 to join the newly established Department of Electronic Materials Engineering in the Research School of Physics and Engineering.[2] He has served during 2012-2016 as Vice-President and Secretary for Physical Sciences of the Australian Academy of Science.[3]

Jagadish and his wife Vidya have launched The Chennupati and Vidya Jagadish Endowment to support students and researchers from developing countries to visit Australian National University Research School of Physics and Engineering.[4]

Awards[edit]

Jagadish was named a Companion of the Order of Australia for eminent services to physics and engineering in the Australia Day Honours 2016.[5][6] He has received many awards and honors including the 2015 IEEE Pioneer Award in Nanotechnology and the 2013 Walter Boas Medal from the Australian Institute of Physics.[citation needed]

He was awarded the Federation Fellowship (2004–2009) and Laureate Fellowship (2009–2014) by the Australian Research Council.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "ANFF ACT & WA Nodes". Australian National Fabrication Facility. 
  2. ^ "IEEE PHOTONICS SOCIETY 2010 Distinguished Service Award Recipient: Chennupati Jagadish". Photonics Society. IEEE. 2010. Retrieved 31 December 2015. 
  3. ^ Australian Academy of Science Annual Report 2013-2014. Canberra: Australian Academy of Science. 2014. p. 11. 
  4. ^ "Endowment fund to support scientists from the developing world". LabOnline. Retrieved 31 December 2015. 
  5. ^ MacDonald, Emma (25 January 2016). "Australia Day Honours 2016: Indian academic Chennupati Jagadish a pioneer in nanotechnology". Brisbane Times. Retrieved 25 January 2016. 
  6. ^ Brereton, Adam (26 January 2016). "Neurotechnologist Chennupati Jagadish: 'science is fun for me'". The Guardian. Retrieved 25 January 2016. 
  7. ^ "Australian Laureate Fellowships Announcement". 

External links[edit]