Cherry Hill (amusement park)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Cherry Hill
Location Kaysville, Utah, United States
Coordinates 41°00′49″N 111°54′51″W / 41.013719°N 111.914090°W / 41.013719; -111.914090Coordinates: 41°00′49″N 111°54′51″W / 41.013719°N 111.914090°W / 41.013719; -111.914090
Opened 1967
Website Official Cherry Hill Website

Cherry Hill is a small campground/amusement park in Kaysville, Utah. The park opened for business on June 4, 1967 originally as just a campground. It later, based upon the popularity of it as a campsite, created some water attractions for its campers to enjoy in the summer season. It is mainly popular during the summer because of its main focus of water rides. The park also contains many other attractions such as miniature golf, batting cages, a ball crawl for kids, Basketball on Trampolines, a rock climbing wall, Arcade games, and the occasional concert.

Pre-Cherry Hill[edit]

Before 1967 the land was 20 acres of a working cherry farm. Many of the trees, of the over 700 there, are still cherry trees. Grant S. Lloyd, the farmer born and raised there, received the property from his father who split the property in two to both of his sons. Lloyd got the southern portion, that was 2 acres larger than the northern portion, when he lost a coin toss to his brother who elected to take the northern half. Lloyd sold the sand from the extra 2 acres to the Utah Highway Department for .02 cents a yard so they could build Interstate 15 nearby. He sold it with no regrets, as the sand from the 2 acres restricted the growth of his fruit trees. He realized he could make some greater profit on his land that would give him much more money than his farm. Now that he was near a busy interstate he partnered with a Chevron gas station that was built close by and teamed up with restaurants to be built on his property for lease. As these things occurred he and his wife planned on constructing the campground and produce even more profit.

On June 4, 1967 the campground opened. Named "Crossroads Camping", it helped travelers with its food, cheap gas, and hospitality.[1]

External links and References[edit]