Chesilhurst, New Jersey

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Chesilhurst, New Jersey
Borough of Chesilhurst
Grant A.M.E. Church
Grant A.M.E. Church
Chesilhurst highlighted in Camden County. Inset: Location of Camden County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Chesilhurst highlighted in Camden County. Inset: Location of Camden County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Chesilhurst, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Chesilhurst, New Jersey
Chesilhurst is located in Camden County, New Jersey
Chesilhurst
Chesilhurst
Location in Camden County
Chesilhurst is located in New Jersey
Chesilhurst
Chesilhurst
Location in New Jersey
Chesilhurst is located in the United States
Chesilhurst
Chesilhurst
Location in the United States
Coordinates: 39°43′47″N 74°52′50″W / 39.729795°N 74.880531°W / 39.729795; -74.880531Coordinates: 39°43′47″N 74°52′50″W / 39.729795°N 74.880531°W / 39.729795; -74.880531[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
CountyCamden
IncorporatedNovember 26, 1887
Government
 • TypeBorough
 • BodyBorough Council
 • MayorJamila A. Odom-Garnett (D, term ends December 31, 2023)[3][4]
 • Municipal clerkGloria Rose (acting)[citation needed]
Area
 • Total1.72 sq mi (4.45 km2)
 • Land1.72 sq mi (4.44 km2)
 • Water<0.01 sq mi (<0.01 km2)  0.12%
Area rank430th of 565 in state
20th of 37 in county[1]
Elevation151 ft (46 m)
Population
 • Total1,634
 • Estimate 
(2019)[10]
1,618
 • Rank508th of 566 in state
33rd of 37 in county[11]
 • Density951.2/sq mi (367.3/km2)
 • Density rank391st of 566 in state
33rd of 37 in county[11]
Time zoneUTC−05:00 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC−04:00 (Eastern (EDT))
ZIP Code
08089[12]
Area code(s)856[13]
FIPS code3400712550[1][14][15]
GNIS feature ID0885183[1][16]
Websitewww.chesilhurstgov.net

Chesilhurst is a borough in Camden County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 1,634,[7][8][9] reflecting an increase of 114 (+7.5%) from the 1,520 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn declined by 6 (-0.4%) from the 1,526 counted in the 1990 Census.[17] New Jersey Monthly magazine ranked Chesilhurst last among the towns rated in its 2008 rankings of "Best Places to Live" in New Jersey (placing at # 566).[18]

Chesilhurst was incorporated as a borough by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on November 26, 1887, from portions of Waterford Township and Winslow Township, based on the results of a referendum held on October 18, 1887.[19]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 1.72 square miles (4.45 km2), including 1.72 square miles (4.44 km2) of land and <0.01 square miles (<0.01 km2) of water (0.12%).[1][2]

The borough borders both Waterford Township and Winslow Township.[20][21][22]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1900283
1910246−13.1%
192028716.7%
19302983.8%
19403083.4%
19503141.9%
196038422.3%
1970801108.6%
19801,59098.5%
19901,526−4.0%
20001,520−0.4%
20101,6347.5%
2019 (est.)1,618[10][23]−1.0%
Population sources:
1900-2000[24] 1900-1920[25]
1900-1910[26] 1910-1930[27]
1930-1990[28] 2000[29][30] 2010[7][8][9]

Census 2010[edit]

The 2010 United States Census counted 1,634 people, 582 households, and 376 families in the borough. The population density was 951.2 inhabitants per square mile (367.3/km2). There were 621 housing units at an average density of 361.5 per square mile (139.6/km2). The racial makeup was 42.35% (692) White, 46.39% (758) Black or African American, 0.43% (7) Native American, 0.86% (14) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 6.98% (114) from other races, and 3.00% (49) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 11.57% (189) of the population.[7]

Of the 582 households, 18.7% had children under the age of 18; 40.5% were married couples living together; 18.0% had a female householder with no husband present and 35.4% were non-families. Of all households, 29.2% were made up of individuals and 15.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.62 and the average family size was 3.24.[7]

17.8% of the population were under the age of 18, 7.7% from 18 to 24, 23.5% from 25 to 44, 31.3% from 45 to 64, and 19.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 45.7 years. For every 100 females, the population had 93.8 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and older there were 89.7 males.[7]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $57,969 (with a margin of error of +/- $14,321) and the median family income was $76,406 (+/- $14,069). Males had a median income of $42,232 (+/- $4,747) versus $36,908 (+/- $6,544) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $24,646 (+/- $2,686). About 3.2% of families and 8.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.8% of those under age 18 and 16.9% of those age 65 or over.[31]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[14] there were 1,520 people, 493 households, and 345 families residing in the borough. The population density was 885.8 people per square mile (341.2/km2). There were 535 housing units at an average density of 311.8 per square mile (120.1/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 37.37% White, 55.99% African American, 0.20% Native American, 0.33% Asian, 2.89% from other races, and 3.22% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.08% of the population.[29][30]

There were 493 households, out of which 26.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 46.5% were married couples living together, 18.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.0% were non-families. 25.2% of all households were made up of individuals, and 11.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.81 and the average family size was 3.32.[29][30]

In the borough the population was spread out, with 22.9% under the age of 18, 7.0% from 18 to 24, 25.1% from 25 to 44, 30.0% from 45 to 64, and 15.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42 years. For every 100 females, there were 100.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.6 males.[29][30]

The median income for a household in the borough was $41,786, and the median income for a family was $50,263. Males had a median income of $33,333 versus $28,500 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $15,252. About 8.0% of families and 15.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 16.0% of those under age 18 and 10.3% of those age 65 or over.[29][30]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Chesilhurst is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government, which is used in 218 municipalities (of the 565) statewide, making it the most common form of government in New Jersey.[32] The governing body is comprised of a Mayor and a Borough Council, with all positions elected at-large on a partisan basis as part of the November general election. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council is comprised of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle.[5] The Borough form of government used by Chesilhurst is a "weak mayor / strong council" government in which council members act as the legislative body with the mayor presiding at meetings and voting only in the event of a tie. The mayor can veto ordinances subject to an override by a two-thirds majority vote of the council. The mayor makes committee and liaison assignments for council members, and most appointments are made by the mayor with the advice and consent of the council.[33][34]

As of 2020, the Mayor of Chesilhurst is Democrat Jamila A. Odom-Garnett, whose term of office ends December 31, 2023. Members of the Borough Council are Rukiah Alwan (D, 2020), Russell S. Hirn Sr. (D, 2022), Monica Holmes (D, 2022), Herbert Littles (D, 2021) and Matthew Marrone (D, 2021), with the seat expiring in December 2020 that had been held by Mayor Odom-Garnett vacant.[3][35][36][37][38]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Chesilhurst is located in the 1st Congressional District[39] and is part of New Jersey's 4th state legislative district.[8][40][41] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Chesilhurst had been in the 6th state legislative district.[42]

For the 116th United States Congress, New Jersey's First Congressional District is represented by Donald Norcross (D, Camden).[43][44] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Democrats Cory Booker (Newark, term ends 2021)[45] and Bob Menendez (Paramus, term ends 2025).[46][47]

For the 2018–2019 session (Senate, General Assembly), the 4th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Fred H. Madden (D, Washington Township, Gloucester County) and in the General Assembly by Paul Moriarty (D, Washington Township, Gloucester County) and Gabriela Mosquera (D, Gloucester Township).[48][49]

Camden County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders, whose seven members chosen at-large in partisan elections to three-year terms office on a staggered basis, with either two or three seats coming up for election each year.[50] As of 2018, Camden County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Louis Cappelli Jr. (D, Collingswood, term as freeholder ends December 31, 2020; term as director ends 2018),[51] Freeholder Deputy Director Edward T. McDonnell (D, Pennsauken Township, term as freeholder ends 2019; term as deputy director ends 2018),[52] Susan Shin Angulo (D, Cherry Hill, 2018),[53] William F. Moen Jr. (D, Camden, 2018),[54] Jeffrey L. Nash (D, Cherry Hill, 2018),[55] Carmen Rodriguez (D, Merchantville, 2019)[56] and Jonathan L. Young Sr. (D, Berlin Township, 2020).[57][50]

Camden County's constitutional officers, all elected directly by voters, are County clerk Joseph Ripa (Voorhees Township, 2019),[58][59] Sheriff Gilbert "Whip" Wilson (Camden, 2018)[60][61] and Surrogate Michelle Gentek-Mayer (Gloucester Township, 2020).[62][63][64] The Camden County Prosecutor is Mary Eva Colalillo.[65][66]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 1,156 registered voters in Chesilhurst, of which 673 (58.2%) were registered as Democrats, 79 (6.8%) were registered as Republicans and 404 (34.9%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were no voters registered to other parties.[67]

In the 2012 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 82.8% of the vote (629 cast), ahead of Republican Mitt Romney with 16.2% (123 votes), and other candidates with 1.1% (8 votes), among the 767 ballots cast by the borough's 1,250 registered voters (7 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 61.4%.[68][69] In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 82.8% of the vote (657 cast), ahead of Republican John McCain, who received around 14.2% (113 votes), with 793 ballots cast among the borough's 1,241 registered voters, for a turnout of 63.9%.[70] In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 77.4% of the vote (518 ballots cast), outpolling Republican George W. Bush, who received around 19.4% (130 votes), with 669 ballots cast among the borough's 1,038 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 64.5.[71]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Democrat Barbara Buono received 64.2% of the vote (249 cast), ahead of Republican Chris Christie with 34.8% (135 votes), and other candidates with 1.0% (4 votes), among the 400 ballots cast by the borough's 1,240 registered voters (12 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 32.3%.[72][73] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Democrat Jon Corzine received 71.4% of the vote (314 ballots cast), ahead of both Republican Chris Christie with 23.2% (102 votes) and Independent Chris Daggett with 2.7% (12 votes), with 440 ballots cast among the borough's 1,161 registered voters, yielding a 37.9% turnout.[74]

Education[edit]

The Chesilhurst Borough School District had served public school students in kindergarten through sixth grade at Shirley B. Foster Elementary School. After the completion of the 2008–09 school year, the district was no longer operating any schools and began sending all of its students to the Winslow Township School District as part of a sending/receiving relationship that commenced in the 2009–10 school year.[75][76]

Despite the fact that the district does not operate any school facilities, The district's board of education, with five members, sets policy and oversees the operation of the sending relationship. As a Type II school district, the board's trustees are elected directly by voters to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats up for election each year held (since 2012) as part of the November general election.[77][78][79]

Transportation[edit]

U.S. Route 30 westbound in Chesilhurst

Roads and highways[edit]

As of May 2010, the borough had a total of 19.89 miles (32.01 km) of roadways, of which 15.47 miles (24.90 km) were maintained by the municipality, 3.27 miles (5.26 km) by Camden County and 1.15 miles (1.85 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[80]

US 30 is the main road serving Chesilhurst. CR 536 runs along the southern border briefly. The Atlantic City Expressway is accessible in neighboring Winslow Township.

Public transportation[edit]

NJ Transit local bus service is provided on the 554 route between the Lindenwold station and Atlantic City.[81][82]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f 2019 Census Gazetteer Files: New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 1, 2020.
  2. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  3. ^ a b Mayor & Council Members, Borough of Chesilhurst. Accessed March 23, 2020. As of date accessed, membership has not been updated for 2020.
  4. ^ 2020 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed February 1, 2020.
  5. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 33.
  6. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Chesilhurst, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 5, 2013.
  7. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Chesilhurst borough, Camden County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 4, 2012.
  8. ^ a b c d Municipalities Sorted by 2011-2020 Legislative District, New Jersey Department of State. Accessed February 1, 2020.
  9. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Chesilhurst borough Archived 2018-03-22 at the Wayback Machine, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed October 4, 2012.
  10. ^ a b Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Minor Civil Divisions in New Jersey: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2019, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2020.
  11. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey , United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 4, 2012.
  12. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Chesilhurst, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed October 4, 2012.
  13. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Chesilhurst, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed February 14, 2015.
  14. ^ a b U.S. Census website , United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  15. ^ Geographic Codes Lookup for New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed October 4, 2012.
  16. ^ US Board on Geographic Names, United States Geological Survey. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  17. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed October 4, 2012.
  18. ^ "Best Places To Live - The Complete Top Towns List 501-566" Archived March 2, 2008, at the Wayback Machine, New Jersey Monthly, posted February 25, 2008. Accessed February 26, 2008.
  19. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 104. Accessed October 4, 2012.
  20. ^ Areas touching Chesilhurst, MapIt. Accessed March 22, 2020.
  21. ^ Municipalities within Camden County, NJ, Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission. Accessed March 22, 2020.
  22. ^ New Jersey Municipal Boundaries, New Jersey Department of Transportation. Accessed November 15, 2019.
  23. ^ Census Estimates for New Jersey April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2019, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2020.
  24. ^ Barnett, Bob. Population Data for Camden County Municipalities, 1850 - 2000, WestJersey.org, January 6, 2011. Accessed October 4, 2012.
  25. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed August 14, 2013.
  26. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 336. Accessed October 4, 2012.
  27. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States: 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 715. Accessed October 4, 2012.
  28. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network. Accessed June 28, 2015.
  29. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Chesilhurst borough, New Jersey Archived 2006-10-06 at the Wayback Machine, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 4, 2012.
  30. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Chesilhurst borough, Camden County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 4, 2012.
  31. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Chesilhurst borough, Camden County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 4, 2012.
  32. ^ Inventory of Municipal Forms of Government in New Jersey, Rutgers University Center for Government Studies, July 1, 2011. Accessed November 18, 2019.
  33. ^ Cerra, Michael F. "Forms of Government: Everything You've Always Wanted to Know, But Were Afraid to Ask" Archived 2014-09-24 at the Wayback Machine, New Jersey State League of Municipalities. Accessed November 30, 2014.
  34. ^ "Forms of Municipal Government in New Jersey", p. 6. Rutgers University Center for Government Studies. Accessed June 3, 2015.
  35. ^ 2019 Municipal Data Sheet, Borough of Chesilhurst. Accessed September 13, 2019.
  36. ^ Official Election Results 2019 General Election November 5, 2019, Camden County, New Jersey, updated November 15, 2019. Accessed January 1, 2020.
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  45. ^ About Cory Booker, United States Senate. Accessed January 26, 2015. "He now owns a home and lives in Newark's Central Ward community."
  46. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate, January 26, 2015. "He currently lives in Paramus and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
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  50. ^ a b About the Freeholder Board, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed June 6, 2018.
  51. ^ Louis Cappelli Jr. , Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed June 6, 2018.
  52. ^ Edward T. McDonnell, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed June 6, 2018.
  53. ^ Susan Shin Angulo, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed June 6, 2018.
  54. ^ William F. Moen Jr.l, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed June 6, 2018.
  55. ^ Jeffrey L. Nash, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed June 6, 2018.
  56. ^ Carmen Rodriguez, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed June 6, 2018.
  57. ^ Jonathan L. Young Sr., Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed June 6, 2018.
  58. ^ County Clerk Joseph Ripa, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed June 6, 2018.
  59. ^ Members List: Clerks, Constitutional Officers Association of New Jersey. Accessed June 6, 2018.
  60. ^ Sheriff Gilbert "Whip" Wilson, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed June 6, 2018.
  61. ^ Members List: Sheriffs, Constitutional Officers Association of New Jersey. Accessed June 6, 2018.
  62. ^ Surrogate Michelle Gentek-Mayer, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed June 6, 2018.
  63. ^ Members List: Surrogates , Constitutional Officers Association of New Jersey. Accessed June 6, 2018.
  64. ^ Your Government, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed June 6, 2018.
  65. ^ Prosecutor Mary Eva Colalillo, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed June 6, 2018.
  66. ^ Prosecutor's Bio, Office of the Camden County Prosecutor. Accessed June 6, 2018.
  67. ^ Voter Registration Summary - Camden, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed October 15, 2012.
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  75. ^ Osborne, James. "N.J. to investigate Chesilhurst school district", The Philadelphia Inquirer, June 12, 2010. Accessed July 17, 2011. "Up until last year, Chesilhurst functioned as a traditional school district and maintained a single elementary school. In the spring of 2009, the school board voted to close that school and bus its students to Winslow, leaving Chesilhurst to operate in an administrative capacity with a skeleton staff. Chesilhurst, a small district on the edge of the Pinelands, subsequently was declared a non-operating district by the state and set for closure at the end of June 2010."
  76. ^ Comprehensive Annual Financial Report for the Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 2010, Chesilhurst Board of Education. Accessed July 17, 2011. "Up through the 2008-2009 fiscal year, the District provided a full range of educational services appropriate to grade levels Pre-K through 6.... Beginning in the 2009-2010 fiscal year, the District entered into a sending/receiving tuition arrangement with Winslow Township Board of Education which included all students."
  77. ^ New Jersey Boards of Education by District Election Types - 2018 School Election, New Jersey Department of Education, updated February 16, 2018. Accessed January 26, 2020.
  78. ^ Comprehensive Annual Financial Report of the Chesilhurst School District, New Jersey Department of Education, for year ending June 30, 2018. Accessed March 23, 2020. "The Borough of Chesilhurst School District is a Type II District located in the State ofNew Jersey. As a Type II District, the School District functions independently through a Board of Education. The board is comprised of seven members elected to three-year terms. These terms are staggered so that three members' terms expire each year."
  79. ^ Board Members, Chesilhurst Board of Education. Accessed March 23, 2020.
  80. ^ Camden County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed July 18, 2014.
  81. ^ Camden County Bus/Rail Connections, NJ Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 22, 2009. Accessed July 17, 2011.
  82. ^ South Jersey Transit Guide Archived 2018-09-29 at the Wayback Machine, Cross County Connection, as of April 1, 2010. Accessed December 13, 2014.

External links[edit]