Chesley, Ontario

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Chesley
community
Motto: Nicest Town Around
Location of Bruce County, of which Chesley is centrally located
Location of Bruce County, of which Chesley is centrally located
Coordinates: 44°18′N 81°06′W / 44.300°N 81.100°W / 44.300; -81.100
Country Canada Canada
Province Ontario Ontario
County Bruce County
Township Arran-Elderslie
Founded 1858
Established 1865
Incorporated 1879
Government
 • Mayor of Arran-Elderslie Ron Oswald
 • MP Larry Miller
 • MPP Bill Walker
Elevation 300 m (1,000 ft)
Population
 • Total 2,000
 • Demonym Chesleyite
Time zone EST (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
Area code(s) 226, 519
Website arran-elderslie.com

Chesley (originally Sconeville) is a community in Bruce County, Ontario, Canada, located within the municipality of Arran-Elderslie.[1][2] Its town slogan is "The Nicest Town Around."[3] Chesley is located north of both Walkerton on Bruce Road 19 and Hanover on County Road 10.

The town was named after Solomon Chesley, a former official in the Indian Department in Canada West. It is now an example of a typical rural Ontario community.

Chesley originally developed around mills built on the Saugeen River around 1858.[4] It expanded further when it was connected to the Grand Trunk Railroad in 1881. A great fire destroyed most of the original downtown core in 1888, and the destroyed wood buildings were replaced by brick and stone.

From 1877 to 2004, the town had a weekly newspaper called The Chesley Enterprise.[4][5]

The town's major source of employment is commercial manufacturing. From 1886 to 1987, the Krug family operated the Krug Bros. furniture manufacturing business. Currently Crate Designs, a locally owned furniture manufacturing factory, is the only surviving furniture factory, following the recent downsizing of Durham Furniture (2007).

Chesley had a high school called the Chesley District High School, a community public school called Kinghurst Community School, an arena and community centre, and several small local stores. The schools were combined into a Junior Kindergarten - Grade 12 school called the Chesley District Community School in 2014.[6][7]

A number of franchises also exist in the town, including New Orleans Pizza, Rona, Home Hardware, and Rexall Drugs.

The town is known for the statue of a giant bull on the north end of town, which is affectionately known as "Big Bruce."

Recently the town has begun to create a network of walking trails that encompasses much of the town's existing infrastructure of walking paths. Known as the heritage trail, it spans a large part of the town, and its waterside parks.

In 2005, Chesley was able to open a Heritage and Woodworking Museum due to a Trillium Foundation grant.[8] The Museum was housed in the Dawson House on 1st Avenue, formerly the home of town doctors Stewart and Dawson.[9][10] The building had been left to the town for public use in the 1970s; in 2013, Chesley put Dawson House up for sale.[9]

Gallery[edit]

Famous residents[edit]

Coordinates: 44°18′N 81°06′W / 44.300°N 81.100°W / 44.300; -81.100

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The Founding of Chesley Historical Plaque". www.ontarioplaques.com. Retrieved 2017-01-13. 
  2. ^ "Railpast Junction - Chasing History & Railfanning for Fun". railpast.com. Retrieved 2017-01-13. 
  3. ^ "Chesley, Ontario Canada | town on Saugeen River - Bruce County - Explore The Bruce". Bruce County - Explore The Bruce. Retrieved 2017-01-13. 
  4. ^ a b "History of the County of Bruce Ontario Canada". www.electricscotland.com. Retrieved 2017-01-13. 
  5. ^ nurun.com. "An enterprising history". The Post. Retrieved 2017-01-13. 
  6. ^ "About Our School". www.cdcs.bwdsb.on.ca. Retrieved 2017-01-13. 
  7. ^ nurun.com. "Getting ready for the new Chelsey School". The Post. Retrieved 2017-01-13. 
  8. ^ nurun.com. "Chesley museum in danger of closing". Owen Sound Sun Times. Retrieved 2017-01-13. 
  9. ^ a b nurun.com. "Municipality to put Dawson House up for sale". The Post. Retrieved 2017-01-13. 
  10. ^ "Illustrated number of the Chesley enterprise : Christmas, 1902". Toronto Public Library. Retrieved 2017-01-13.