Chess pie

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Chess pie
Buttermilk Chess Pie, August 2009.jpg
A vanilla buttermilk chess pie
TypePie
Place of originEngland
Main ingredientsPie crust, eggs, butter, granulated sugar, vanilla, corn meal
VariationsLemon chess pie, vinegar pie

Chess pie is a dessert characteristic of southern United States cuisine.

History[edit]

Little is definitively known about chess pie's origins, but it has some similarities to English lemon curd pie. A recipe for similar cheesecake appears in Martha Washington's Booke of Cookery, from the mid-18th century.

Chess pie is most commonly associated as a dessert of the American South. Common types of chess pie are buttermilk, chocolate, lemon, and nut.

Etymology[edit]

The origin of the name chess pie is unknown, but many theories have been proposed. It could be a derivation of "cheese pie", the combination of eggs, butter, and sugar making a custardlike filling that is similar in texture to British cheesecakes and lemon curd;[1] it could be named after the town of Chester, England;[2] it could be from a piece of furniture used prior to home refrigeration called a "pie chest", in which pies were stored; or it could be an eggcorn of "It's just pie," due to a misinterpretation of the pronunciation "It's jes' pie" in Southern American English.[3]

Composition[edit]

The basic chess pie recipe calls for the preparation of a single crust and a filling composed of flour, butter, sugar, and eggs. Some variations call for the addition of cornmeal as a thickener. Many recipes call for an acid such as vinegar, buttermilk, or lemon juice.[4]

In addition to standard chess pie, other flavor variations include lemon, coconut, and chocolate chess pie.[5] Nut pies, including pecan, fall under the category of chess pies.[6]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Stradley, Linda (2015-05-19). "Chess Pie history". What's Cooking America. Retrieved 2018-02-21.
  2. ^ Olver, Lynne. "Food Timeline: history notes-pie & pastry". The Food Timeline. Retrieved 2018-02-21.
  3. ^ Linda (2017). "Chess Pie History". What's Cooking America. Retrieved 2017-06-18.
  4. ^ "Southern Chess Pie: Tips and Variations". The Spruce. Retrieved 2018-02-21.
  5. ^ Schneider, Crady (2017-03-14). "Chess Pie: Nothing More Southern". Porter Briggs. Retrieved 2017-06-19.
  6. ^ "Everything You Need to Know About Classic American Pie". Eater. Retrieved 2018-02-21.