Cheviot sheep: Difference between revisions

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In the 19th century, the Cheviot became increasingly common, as its [[wool]] was said to be ideal for use in durable [[Twill|tweed]] cloth. Today, the Cheviot is a dual-use breed used for meat and for wool. They are hardy mountain breeds and are very alert with good carriage. The Cheviot breed has many organizations that it is related to. Montadales are a mixture of Cheviot and Columbias. Cheviots are the base breed for many breeds that you see today.{{Citation needed|date=June 2007}}
 
In the 19th century, the Cheviot became increasingly common, as its [[wool]] was said to be ideal for use in durable [[Twill|tweed]] cloth. Today, the Cheviot is a dual-use breed used for meat and for wool. They are hardy mountain breeds and are very alert with good carriage. The Cheviot breed has many organizations that it is related to. Montadales are a mixture of Cheviot and Columbias. Cheviots are the base breed for many breeds that you see today.{{Citation needed|date=June 2007}}
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and yur goegie ndd udder stinks like mary haha lol:)
   
 
==Characteristics==
 
==Characteristics==

Revision as of 17:24, 7 December 2010

A Cheviot ewe with her lamb

The Cheviot is a breed of white faced sheep which gets its name from a range of hills in north Northumberland and the Scottish Borders. It is still common in this area of the United Kingdom, but also in north west Scotland, Wales and the south west of England (especially Dartmoor and Exmoor) as well as more rarely in Australia, New Zealand and the United States. The Cheviot is a dual-purpose breed being raised primarily for meat and wool.[1]

History

Early records indicate that the Cheviot was roaming in the border country between Scotland and England and in the Cheviot hills as early as the 14th century, although it would not necessarily have borne much resemblance to the breed we see today. It has been steadily improved over the centuries and crossed with other breeds.

In the 19th century, the Cheviot became increasingly common, as its wool was said to be ideal for use in durable tweed cloth. Today, the Cheviot is a dual-use breed used for meat and for wool. They are hardy mountain breeds and are very alert with good carriage. The Cheviot breed has many organizations that it is related to. Montadales are a mixture of Cheviot and Columbias. Cheviots are the base breed for many breeds that you see today.[citation needed] and yur goegie ndd udder stinks like mary haha lol:)

Characteristics

Mature weight for rams is 160 to 200 lb (70 to 90 kg) with ewes weighing 120 to 160 lb (50 to 70 kg). Mature ewes will average a 5 to 10 lb (2 to 5 kg) fleece that measure 27–33 microns[2] in fibre diameter.[3] and a spinning count of 48–56. The staple length of the fleece will be 3 to 5 in (8 to 13 cm) with a yield of 50 to 75%.[1]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "Cheviot". Breeds of Livestock. Oklahoma State University, Dept. of Animals Science. Retrieved 2009-04-15. 
  2. ^ Preparation of Australian Wool Clips, Code of Practice 2010-2012, Australian Wool Exchange (AWEX), 2010
  3. ^ Sheep breed compendium, Australian Wool Exchange (AWEX), 2010

External links