Chi Ursae Majoris

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Chi Ursae Majoris
Diagram showing star positions and boundaries of the Ursa Major constellation and its surroundings
Diagram showing star positions and boundaries of the Ursa Major constellation and its surroundings

Location of χ Ursae Majoris (circled)
Observation data
Epoch J2000.0      Equinox J2000.0
Constellation Ursa Major
Right ascension 11h 46m 03.0s
Declination +47° 46' 46"
Apparent magnitude (V) +3.69
Characteristics
Spectral type K0.5IIIb
Astrometry
Distance 196 ± 7 ly
(60 ± 2 pc)
Other designations
Alkaphrah, El Koprah, χ Ursae Majoris, χ UMa, Chi UMa, 63 Ursae Majoris, BD+48 1966, FK5 441, GC 16137, HD 102224, HIP 57399, HR 4518, PPM 52620, SAO 43886
Database references
SIMBAD data
Chi Ursae Majoris (top) and NGC 3877 (bottom)

Chi Ursae Majoris (Chi UMa, χ Ursae Majoris, χ UMa) is a star in the constellation Ursa Major. It has the traditional names Alkafzah, Alkaphrah, and El Koprah.

Chi Ursae Majoris is an orange K-type giant with an apparent magnitude of +3.69. It is approximately 196 light years from Earth. This star has 20.8 ± 0.8 times the radius of the Sun.[1]

In Chinese astronomy, Alkafzah is called Tai Yang Show, "the Sun Governor".[2] The name was possibly derived from the word 太陽守, Pinyin: Tàiyángshǒu, meaning Guard of the Sun, because this star is marking itself and stand alone in Guard of the Sun asterism, Purple Forbidden enclosure (see : Chinese constellation).

The Spiral Galaxy in Ursa Major, NGC 3877 (= H I.201), type Sc, is best found from Chi Ursae Majoris, which is almost exactly 15 arc minutes north of the galaxy.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Nordgren, Tyler E.; et al. (December 1999), "Stellar Angular Diameters of Late-Type Giants and Supergiants Measured with the Navy Prototype Optical Interferometer", The Astronomical Journal, 118 (6): 3032–3038, Bibcode:1999AJ....118.3032N, doi:10.1086/301114 
  2. ^ Richard Hinckley Allen: Star Names — Their Lore and Meaning: Ursa Major