Chickering Hall, Boston (1883)

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Chickering Hall (est.1883) was a concert auditorium in Boston, Massachusetts, in the late 19th century. It occupied the second floor of Chickering and Sons showrooms on Tremont Street, near the corner of West Street.[1][2] "Bradlee, Winslow and Wetherell were the architects, and Mr. E.P. Treadwell, the decorator. The hall [was] lighted by the Edison electric light."[3][4] By 1895: "Tremont St., towards Boylston, for some years has been called Piano Row, for a long row of piano agencies occupied a good portion of the block; but of late most of these have migrated to Boylston St. Chickering Hall, at 152 Tremont St., was for many years a favorite place for fashionable musicales, and the headquarters of the musical profession."[5]

Performances/Events[edit]

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See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Illustrated Boston, the metropolis of New England. NY: American publishing and engraving co., 1889
  2. ^ Bacon's Dictionary of Boston. 1886
  3. ^ "The new Chickering: a pretty hall in which exercises were rendered yesterday. Boston Daily Globe, Nov. 8, 1883
  4. ^ Ezra Prentice Treadwell (1848–1903), designer in Boston and NY. Obituary in: Building Trades Association Bulletin, v.4, no.5, May 1903
  5. ^ King's how to see Boston: a trustworthy guide book; Macullar, Parker & Co. souvenir edition. USA: Moses King, 1895
  6. ^ James Dow McCallum. "The Apostle of Culture Meets America." New England Quarterly, Vol. 2, No. 3 (Jul., 1929), pp. 357-381
  7. ^ Boston Globe, Nov. 23, 1883
  8. ^ Lee M. Edwards. "Hubert Herkomer in America." American Art Journal, Vol. 21, No. 3 (1989), pp. 48-73
  9. ^ Boston Globe, Dec. 1, 1889
  10. ^ Boston Globe, Oct. 19, 1890
  11. ^ Boston Globe, Jan. 25, 1891
  12. ^ Barnard Hewitt. "'Margaret Fleming' in Chickering Hall: The First Little Theatre in America?." Theatre Journal, Vol. 34, No. 2, Insurgency in American Theatre (May, 1982), pp. 165- 171
  13. ^ Boston Globe, Jan. 7, 1892
  14. ^ Boston Globe, Jan. 7, 1892
  15. ^ Columbia University Library treasures: Sonata Tragica, G minor (Opus 45)
  16. ^ Boston Globe, Feb. 3, 1893; Feb. 2, 1894

Coordinates: 42°21′16.26″N 71°3′49.28″W / 42.3545167°N 71.0636889°W / 42.3545167; -71.0636889