List of Chief Ministers of Meghalaya

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Chief Minister of Meghalaya
Mukul Sangma and Shaik Mydeen (cropped).jpg
Incumbent
Mukul Sangma

since 20 April 2010
Appointer Governor of Meghalaya
Inaugural holder Williamson A. Sangma
Formation 2 April 1970
Salary ₹1.09 lakh (gross) per month[1]

The Chief Minister of Meghalaya is the chief executive of the northeast Indian state of Meghalaya. As per the Constitution of India, the governor is a state's de jure head, but de facto executive authority rests with the chief minister. Following elections to the Meghalaya Legislative Assembly, the state's governor usually invites the party (or coalition) with a majority of seats to form the government. The governor appoints the chief minister, whose council of ministers are collectively responsible to the assembly. Given that he has the confidence of the assembly, the chief minister's term is for five years and is subject to no term limits.[2]

Since 1970, eleven people have served as Chief Minister of Meghalaya. Six of these belonged to the Indian National Congress, including the inaugural officeholder Williamson A. Sangma and the current incumbent Mukul Sangma, in office since 20 April 2010.

List[edit]

No[a] Name Term of office[3] Party[b] Days in office
1 Williamson A. Sangma
MLA for Siju
2 April 1970 21 January 1972 All Party Hill Leaders Conference 842 Days
21 January 1972 18 March 1972 58 Days
18 March 1972 21 November 1976 1710 Days
22 November 1976 3 March 1978 Indian National Congress 437 Days
2 Darwin Diengdoh Pugh
MLA for Mawkhar
10 March 1978 21 February 1979 All Party Hill Leaders Conference 348 Days
21 February 1979 6 May 1979 75 Days [Total 423 Days]
3 B. B. Lyngdoh
MLA for Lyngkyrdem
7 May 1979 7 May 1981 732 Days
(1) Williamson A. Sangma
MLA for Baghmara
7 May 1981 24 February 1983 Indian National Congress 657 Days
(3) B. B. Lyngdoh
MLA for Lyngkyrdem
2 March 1983 31 March 1983 All Party Hill Leaders Conference 30 Days
(1) Williamson A. Sangma
MLA for Baghmara
2 April 1983 5 February 1988 Indian National Congress 1769 Days [Total 5199 Days]
4 P. A. Sangma
MLA for Tura
6 February 1988 25 March 1990 779 Days
(3) B. B. Lyngdoh
MLA for Lyngkyrdem
26 March 1990 10 October 1991 HPU 564 Days
Vacant[c]
(President's rule)
11 October 1991 5 February 1992 N/A
5 D.D. Lapang
MLA for Nongpoh
5 February 1992 19 February 1993 Indian National Congress 381 Days
6 S. C. Marak
MLA for Resubelpara
19 February 1993 27 February 1998 1835 Days
27 February 1998 10 March 1998 13 Days [Total 1848 Days]
(3) B. B. Lyngdoh
MLA for Lyngkyrdem
10 March 1998 8 March 2000 United Democratic Party 729 Days [Total 2055 Days]
7 E. K. Mawlong
MLA for Umroi
8 March 2000 8 December 2001 275 Days
8 Flinder Anderson Khonglam
MLA for Sohra
8 December 2001 4 March 2003 Independent 452 Days
(5) D. D. Lapang
MLA for Nongpoh
4 March 2003 15 June 2006 Indian National Congress 1230 Days
9 J. D. Rymbai
MLA for Jirang
15 June 2006 10 March 2007 268 Days
(5) D. D. Lapang
MLA for Nongpoh
10 March 2007 4 March 2008 360 Days
4 March 2008 19 March 2008 16 Days
10 Donkupar Roy
MLA for Shella
19 March 2008 18 March 2009 United Democratic Party 365 Days
Vacant[c]
(President's rule)
18 March 2009 12 May 2009 N/A
(5) D. D. Lapang
MLA for Nongpoh
13 May 2009 19 April 2010 Indian National Congress 341 Days [Total 2328 Days]
11 Mukul Sangma
MLA for Ampati
20 April 2010 5 March 2013 7 years, 9 days
5 March 2013 Incumbent

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

Footnotes
  1. ^ A number inside brackets indicates that the incumbent has previously held office.
  2. ^ This column only names the chief minister's party. The state government he headed may have been a complex coalition of several parties and independents; these are not listed here.
  3. ^ a b President's rule may be imposed when the "government in a state is not able to function as per the Constitution", which often happens because no party or coalition has a majority in the assembly. When President's rule is in force in a state, its council of ministers stands dissolved. The office of chief minister thus lies vacant, and the administration is taken over by the governor, who functions on behalf of the central government. At times, the legislative assembly also stands dissolved.[4]
References
  1. ^ "Meghalaya Assembly Passes Bill to Double MLAs' Salaries". The Northeast Today. March 25, 2017. Retrieved March 25, 2017. 
  2. ^ Durga Das Basu. Introduction to the Constitution of India. 1960. 20th Edition, 2011 Reprint. pp. 241, 245. LexisNexis Butterworths Wadhwa Nagpur. ISBN 978-81-8038-559-9. Note: although the text talks about Indian state governments in general, it applies for the specific case of Meghalaya as well.
  3. ^ http://megassembly.gov.in/governors_chiefministers.htm
  4. ^ Amberish K. Diwanji. "A dummy's guide to President's rule". Rediff.com. 15 March 2005.

External links[edit]