Chihayaakasaka, Osaka

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Chihayaakasaka
千早赤阪村
Village
Flag of Chihayaakasaka
Flag
Location of Chihayaakasaka in Osaka Prefecture
Location of Chihayaakasaka in Osaka Prefecture
Chihayaakasaka is located in Japan
Chihayaakasaka
Chihayaakasaka
Location in Japan
Coordinates: 34°28′N 135°37′E / 34.467°N 135.617°E / 34.467; 135.617Coordinates: 34°28′N 135°37′E / 34.467°N 135.617°E / 34.467; 135.617
Country Japan
Region Kansai
Kinki
Prefecture Osaka Prefecture
District Minamikawachi
Area
 • Total 37.38 km2 (14.43 sq mi)
Population (February 28, 2017)
 • Total 5,467
 • Density 150/km2 (380/sq mi)
Time zone Japan Standard Time (UTC+9)
Website www.vill.chihayaakasaka.osaka.jp

Chihayaakasaka (千早赤阪村, Chihayaakasaka-mura) is a village located in Minamikawachi District, Osaka Prefecture, Japan.

As of February 2017, the village has an estimated population of 5,467 and a population density of 164 persons per km².[1] The total area is 37.38 km².

History[edit]

Village office of Chihayaakasaka

This village is known for the sites of Chihaya and Akasaka Castles. These were two different fortifications on Mount Kongo, where the Battle of Chihaya Castle and the Battle of Akasaka occurred in the 14th century, during the late Kamakura period. Kusunoki Masashige led the defense of the castles, and was the most important and reliable man to serve Emperor Go-Daigo. Today there is a museum to commemorate this battle and Kusunoki's participation.

In 1893, Akasaka, Kumatarō Kido and Yagorō Tani murdered 10 people, and left one infant alive. They then killed themselves after the murders.

On March 1, 2008 Chihayaakasaka requested a merge into the adjacent city of Kawachinagano, after talks of merging with the surrounding towns of Kanan and Taishi fell through.[2] These plans also fell through as of August 14, 2009.

Places of interest[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Official website of Chihayaakasaka" (in Japanese). Japan: Village of Chihayaakasaka. Retrieved 11 April 2017. 
  2. ^ Asahi Shimbun, Osaka edition, April 30th 2007, p. 1, 大阪唯一の村消える? Ōsaka yuiitsu no mura kieru?

Sources[edit]

  • Asahi Shimbun, Osaka edition, April 30, 2007, p. 1, 大阪唯一の村消える? Ōsaka yuiitsu no mura kieru?

External links[edit]