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Chikorita

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Chikorita
Pokémon series character
Pokémon Chikorita art.png
National Pokédex
Mew - Chikorita (#152) - Bayleef
First gamePokémon Gold and Silver
Designed byKen Sugimori
Voiced by

Chikorita (/ˌɪkəˈrtə/), known as Chicorita (チコリータ Chikorīta) in Japan, is a Pokémon species in Nintendo and Game Freak's Pokémon franchise.

Chikorita is featured in the Pokémon anime series, most commonly under the ownership of the main character Ash Ketchum.

Appearances[edit]

In video games[edit]

Chikorita's debut video game appearance was in the 1999 Japanese release of Pokémon Gold and Silver. It is one of three starter Pokémon the player can select at the beginning of the game as well as in Pokémon Crystal and their remakes, Pokémon HeartGold and SoulSilver along with Cyndaquil and Totodile. In Pokémon Emerald, Chikorita and the other starters can be chosen from after completing the Hoenn Pokédex. In Pokémon Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire, Chikorita can be obtained from Professor Birch following the Delta Episode. In Pokémon Sun and Moon, Chikorita, normally unobtainable in the wild, can be found by scanning QR codes while on Melemele Island. Chikorita has made several appearances in other games. In both Super Smash Bros. Melee and Super Smash Bros. Brawl, Chikorita can be used to attack opponents with a Razor Leaf when released from a Poke Ball. In 2017 Chikorita appeared in Pokémon Go app, along with Cyndaquil, Totodile and 77 others.[1]


In anime[edit]

In the anime, the most notable Chikorita is the one caught by Ash Ketchum. Ash encountered Chikorita in the wild, saving it from Team Rocket and befriending it after, causing Chikorita to consensually join him without a battle and capture.[2] Chikorita developed a crush on Ash soon thereafter, oftentimes instantly going to show affection toward Ash instead of battling when let out of her Poke Ball to do so specifically.[3] She yearned for his attention and became jealous of his Pikachu to the point of once running away, only to return when Ash showed concern for her feelings. In gym battles, Chikorita was defeated by Faulkner's Hoothoot and defeated Bugsy's Spinarak but was defeated by his Metapod. Both gym battles display Chikorita's weaknesses, namely to Flying and Bug-type Pokémon. Chikorita also appears during the third film, being bested by Lisa's Girafarig.[4] Chikorita later evolved into Bayleef protecting Ash from Team Rocket.[5]

The first Chikorita to appear in the anime was that owned by Casey, who obtained it as a starter Pokémon. It later evolved into a Bayleef and then a Meganium. Another Chikorita appeared under the ownership of Silver, who encounters Ritchie.[6] Chikorita appears during the Sinnoh arc owned by Lyra, battling in a tag battle. Another Chikorita also appears during the twelfth film with the other Johto starters.[7]

In printed adaptions[edit]

In the Pokémon Adventures manga, Chikorita is the last Johto starter to gain a trainer, running away from Professor Elm to meet Crystal and persuade her to let him join her team. She complies with his request after he passes a test by standing up to her other Pokémon and is given a star pendant.[8] He soon became effective in aiding her in completing the Pokédex,[9] and would remain on her team consistently from that point on. Chikorita later evolves into Bayleef while fighting a Larvitar, contributing to Crystal capturing it.[10]

The Magical Pokémon Journey manga has a Chikorita named Chiko that is shown to be friends with Bulbasaur.[11] In the Pokémon Gold & Silver: The Golden Boys manga, Chikorita is stolen from Professor Elm's lab by Black, a new trainer who takes it as his starter Pokémon.[12] It later evolved into Bayleef. Another Chikorita appears in the Pocket Monsters HeartGold & SoulSilver Go! Go! Pokéathlon one-shot manga, owned by main character Takashi.[13] A Chikorita is stolen by Green from Professor Oak and later returned in the Pokémon Pocket Monsters manga.[14] Tsubaki is seen owning a Chikorita in the Pocket Monsters HGSS Jō's Big Adventure manga, being defeated by Jo's Totodile[15] and later evolving twice.

Reception[edit]

Commercial[edit]

A special edition Game Boy Color was released featuring Chikorita, Totodile, Cyndaquil, and Pikachu, though the first three were removed in the United States release.[16]

Critical[edit]

Authors Tracey West and Katherine Noll wrote that Ash Ketchum's Chikorita in the anime was "one of his most loyal Pokemon ever" and cited how it evolves into Bayleef in order to protect him. They added that "any Trainer would be proud to have this Grass Pokemon on his team".[17]

VentureBeat's Jasmine Maleficent Rea, however, called Chikorita the "dumbest-looking Pokémon in the history of dumpy animated animals".[18] Chikorita is generally considered the worst of the starter Pokémon in Gold and Silver. In Nicholas Bashore's list ranking each starter Pokémon, Chikorita came in 16th place, behind Cyndaquil and Totodile, who ranked #7 and #6 place, respectively.[19] Additionally, while receiving praise itself, its evolutions have been critiqued for their lack of defense, further diminishing its popularity.[20]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Pokémon GO update adds 80 new Pokémon". Metro. 2017-02-15. Retrieved 2018-01-04.
  2. ^ Pokémon anime, episode 126, "The Chikorita Rescue".
  3. ^ Pokémon anime, episode 127, "Once in a Blue Moon".
  4. ^ Pokémon 3: The Movie.
  5. ^ Pokémon anime, episode 199, "Current Events".
  6. ^ Pokémon Chronicles, episode 18, "The Search for the Legend".
  7. ^ Arceus and the Jewel of Life.
  8. ^ Pokémon Adventures, chapter 118.
  9. ^ Pokémon Adventures, chapter 119.
  10. ^ Pokémon Adventures, chapter 135.
  11. ^ Magical Pokémon Journey, chapter 36.
  12. ^ Pokémon Gold & Silver: The Golden Boys, chapter 1.
  13. ^ Pocket Monsters HeartGold & SoulSilver Go! Go! Pokéathlon.
  14. ^ Pokémon Pocket Monsters, chapter 64.
  15. ^ Pocket Monsters HGSS Jō's Big Adventure, chapter 1.
  16. ^ "Now Available: Pokémon GS Limited Edition GBC". IGN. News Corporation. 2001-03-07. Retrieved 2018-01-03.
  17. ^ Tracey West; Katherine Noll (2007). Pokémon top 10 handbook: our top picks!. Scholastic. ISBN 9780545001618.
  18. ^ Dana Laratta (2010-05-16). "The Devolution of Starter Pokémon". VentureBeat. Retrieved 2018-01-04.
  19. ^ Nicholas Bashore (2016-11-14). "Every Starter Pokémon Ever, Ranked". Retrieved 2018-01-04.
  20. ^ "Ranking all 18 starter Pokemon from best to worst". 2dayfm.com. 2016-02-28. Archived from the original on 2016-03-04. Retrieved 2016-11-29.

External links[edit]